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OUTSTANDING BLACK AMERICANS CHANGE RACIAL VIEWPOINTS

One of the first black spokespersons ever to come into the living rooms of millions of white Americans was Oprah Winfrey. Prior to that black Americans excelled in sports. They might have seen Mohammad Ali in a boxing match. Black Americans were gaining recognition in politics. Of course, there was the memory of Martin Luther King. . . . .

Chocolate: Behind Its Bad Rap

Chapter One - Introduction to the Problem

Introduction to the Problem

In today's society, chocolate is everywhere. It seems that people have developed a love-hate relationship with chocolate. According to the US Department of Commerce, in 1997, the average American ate 11.7 pounds of chocolate. American adults ranked chocolate as the most- . . . .

TRIFLES by Susan Glaspell

In "Trifles" by Susan Glaspell, the characteristics of the women and the attitudes to their men and their own roles in life are gradually illuminated. The intensity of the situation, in effect two women judging the life of the third, absent party, provides a context in which Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peter grow significantly, in character, strength and importance. . . . .

When most Americans today think about the problems of getting the oil that is needed to run our economy through the rest of this century, they will no doubt find themselves thinking either about drilling for oil in Alaska - since this topic has been so much in the news over the past several months - or establishing peace in the Middle East so that oil may continue to flow from that region to . . . .

Force Field Analysis is a technique developed by Kurt Lewin..Force Field Analysis is a problem solving technique based on the idea that any problem or situation is the result of forces acting on it. This technique enables one to graphically display a problem, a goal situation, and the forces that manipulate it. Furthermore this technique can be used to describe the problem, look for causes of . . . .

Aristotle studied literary theory in his book, Poetics, and in this study he defined and provided ideas about the concept of tragedy. Tragedy for Aristotle is defined as, "an imitation of life in the form of a serious story that is complete in itself; in other words, the story must be realistic and narrow in focus." He characterized a "good tragedy" if it brings about a feeling of "fear and/or . . . .

It may be said that each section of Maxine Hong Kingston's memoir, The Woman Warrior, may be considered a microcosm of the work as a whole. The section "No Name Woman" incorporates the recurring themes of silence, invisibility, ghosts and using words as weapons.

It is argued, that the story's central theme is the process of "finding a personal voice" (Ling). This is mainly about the . . . .

Higher Order Cerebral Functioning

Summary: This is a 2 page article critique of a paper written on Higher Order Cerebral Functioning

The Article hypothesizes the difference between conscious and unconscious thoughts and suggests that higher order cerebral functioning refers to the cognitive ability of an individual i.e. consciousness.

The primary basis of the article is to . . . .

Cape Fear, Then and Now Martin Scorsese's 1991 remake of the 1962 classic Cape Fear offers superb opportunities to compare American culture and values in two vastly different eras separated by a mere 29 years. The 1962 classic, directed by J. Lee Thompson, coming out of the pure and innocent '50s, was simple, straightforward and scary. Scorsese's version is more complex, sophisticated and . . . .

Hamlet

The play "Hamlet" by William Shakespeare contains a rich diversity of issues and relationships, some of the greatest of which concern those between father and son. These relationships, most notably those between Hamlet and the late King Hamlet, Fortinbras and Old Fortinbras, and Polonius and Laertes, demonstrate a number of significant, unique characteristics as well as several . . . .

The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution

Middlekauff, Robert. The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution. New York: Oxford University Press, 1982.

Robert Middlekauff, born in 1927 in Washington state, holds a B.A. from the University of Washington and a Ph.D. from Yale. He saw active duty as a lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps in Korea from 1952-54. For most of his . . . .

Leone Nelly Sachs was born in Berlin on December 10, 1891. She was the only child of a wealthy Berlin industrialist. The family lived in the Tiergartenviertel, a fashionable area of Berlin. Because of her family's wealth, Nelly was educated by private tutors her before she entered the Berliner Hhere Tchterschule. She studied music and dancing, and at an early age began writing poetry. Her . . . .

The Darkness of Goya

One of the most powerful aspects of a painting is its ability to capture the inner workings of an artist's soul. By his choice of subject matter, and careful use of line, color, and form, the painter expresses his innermost thoughts and emotions. The darkness or lightness of the individual is transferred to his work. The painter with the brooding heart sees humanity . . . .

Through Different Eyes

Egyptian, Greek, and Roman Sculpture

Different cultures see the world in different ways. Religion, society, and even politics, shape our views, and give form to our human environment. Architecture, music, literature, dress—all are visible manifestations of a people's values. This is no less true in the realm of sculpture. A religious people will create . . . .

Structural and Thematic Review of Martin Scorsese's "The Color of Money"

ABSTRACT

American Cinema has succeeded in depicting the realities of present-day America. Martin Scorsese is one such director who has managed the task in his slow burn style. This paper is a review of one of his works, The Color of Money with this perspective.

THE COLOR OF MONEY: STRUCTURAL AND . . . .

Both Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman and Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House have at their core a character who is trapped by social expectations and economic realities. Miller's protagonist, Willy Loman, does his best to ignore the problems in his life - and his attempt to deny the reality around him leads to terrible consequences. Ibsen's protagonist, Nora Helmer, on the other hand, by the end . . . .

Luther and Kant: Visions of Freedom

Freedom carries so many meanings, both denotations and connotations. Perhaps no concept has been hashed out more by western philosophers throughout the centuries. The ramifications of their arguments are vast: as "free" people, we lean heavily on the concept of freedom, but our laws and court cases constantly struggle to define what exactly we can and . . . .

Immanuel Kant in his essay "An Answer to the Question: What is Enlightenment" relates man's freedom to his immaturity, with a special focus on man in relation to society. In "Preface to the Epistle of St. Paul" Martin Luther describes man's freedom in relation to Christian religion. These works not only differ in their content, but are contradictory in meaning, the differences stemming from . . . .

DEATH OF A SALESMAN

Introduction

The Death of Salesman is about an individual who in pursuit of the great American Dream, miserably fails, as he is addicted to his false illusions, which finally lead him and his family to utter chaos and dispersion. This paper will focus the musical element in the story and briefly the discuss it's significance.

From the first the flute is . . . .

Ibsen's Nora

Although it is difficult to know exactly how audiences watching Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House felt about the content of the play when it was first performed, it is difficult for us reading or watching it in the 21st century to see it as anything but a strongly feminist statement.

What is especially striking about the powerful feminism of the play - other than the . . . .

corporal punishment, time-out, and other forms of child discipline

This paper is presented in the format of an outline. It discusses the issue of child discipline including corporal punishment, time-out, and other methods.

INTRODUCTION

The issue of child discipline has been a topic of hot debate for many years.

1. The 1960's brought about a revolutionary change in . . . .

The Life and Works of Andy Warhol

What is the most famous work of contemporary art? Some might say Salvador Dali's melting clocks, others might go back a bit earlier and say the "Sunflowers" painting of Van Gogh. But if you were to ask the average person on the street what artistic image truly springs to mind when they are asked what they think best represents contemporary art, that . . . .

James Baldwin grew up a neglected child. He was a black man in a white man's world--gay man who was trying to make his mark in the world of literature. "You write of your experiences," James Baldwin once said. James Baldwin wrote to overcome the barriers in his life.

To better understand the thematic importance of Paris and the room in this book, we need to begin with the author. . . . .

We all know the story of how Marcel Duchamp took a urinal, called it "Fountain," put it in an art show and then defended his action on the grounds that as he was an artist and he said the urinal was art, then it was.

This is just the sort of thing that has given modern art a bad name. But why should it have? Why should that urinal not be art?

Understanding the answer to that . . . .

The Confessions of Augustine, The Life of Saint Teresa of Avila by Herself, "On the Oration and Dignity of Man," Petrarch's poetry, and Shakespeare's drama "King Lear" are both products of societies in which the dominant religious ethos was Christian rather than pagan. However, although all texts share this similar historical feature, fundamentally opposing views of the self are articulated . . . .

Details of Meeting Attended meeting of the Lawrence County Commission was attended on March 26, 2002 at 5:00 p.m. at the Lawrence County Court House.

Structure of the Government Body

Lawrence County, Tennessee has 18 county commissioners. One commissioner is elected per district to serve a two year term. Each commissioner is then assigned to a different subcommittee, where each . . . .

allegory and idealism in Michael Crichton's Jurassic Park and The Lost World

This paper presents a detailed discussion on the use of allegory and idealism in Michael Crichton's Jurassic Park and The Lost World. The writer draws several examples from the story to illustrate the use of allegory and then discusses its effectiveness. There were three sources used to complete this paper. . . . .

Heathcliff's Character in Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights

This paper focuses on Heathcliff's character in Emily Bronte's only novel. 'Wuthering Heights' with reference to views expressed by some critics. Heathcliff is generally considered a villainous character and most critics have therefore focused on his negative personality traits. This paper therefore focuses on both sides of his . . . .

Overprotective Parents

When a parent first sees their child, it seems so delicate and gentle that their immediate response is to feel nurturing and extremely protective. Parents feel that they have brought this tint child into the world and accept the responsibility for being the child's guardian for the rest of their lives.

Many parents take this guardian role too far. While it . . . .

Yellow Journalism

Introduction

Yellow Journalism is a term used for the use of negligent and flamboyant newspaper reporting, without regard to facts. With yellow journalism the truth is usually misrepresented or concealed, more often than not, there may be no truth to the story at all. In its infancy, the term yellow journalism was used to describe the writing tactics used by . . . .

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