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Government Accounting Office in America (GAO)

This is a ten-page examination of the Government Accounting Office in America. The writer discusses the history, purpose and background of the GAO as well as the duties that the office is charged with performing. The writer then analyzes literature that illustrates the office in action. The final discussion revolves around the question, "Is . . . .

Victims of a Meaningless Show of Force

Assignment 1 - Language Analysis:

In the article "Victims of a Meaningless Show of Force" the author uses language to express her point that police firing on two polar bears was unacceptable behavior and as the author says "it was illogical, unfair, and a meaningless show of force." While this statement makes her opinion clear, the author . . . .

Unix Batch Scripting

Scripting in Unix can be used for batch jobs. The purpose of this approach is to create a reliable repetition of a single task ranging from analysis of real data, processing or reprocessing of raw data to final quality data and reconstruction.

Batch files are a familiar term for those who have used MS DOS in its most basic form and who have background . . . .

Argumentative Essay on corporal punishment is not acceptable in childrearing

Introduction

There is perhaps no more inflammatory a topic within the subject of childrearing than the topic of corporal punishment. This is an issue that people tend to feel very strongly about one way or the other - strength of feeling that is most usually based in moral and ethical beliefs rather than . . . .

COMPARISON OF HOPI AND YANOMAMI

The Hopi Tribe:

The name of the Hopi tribe is the derivation of the word Hopitu which means "peaceful ones," or Hopitu-shinumu, meaning "peaceful all people." The area where the Hopi live is a territory covering about 4,000 square miles in northeastern region of the state of Arizona. This territory was historically famous as the Tusayan region. . . . .

Hispanic Population in the United States

Researchers in demographics have persistently foretold that the rapidly growing Hispanic population would inevitably develop into the leading minority group in the United States. Updated data released from the 2000 census reveal that this belief is fast approaching actualisation. The data indicates that America's Hispanic population grew by 58% . . . .

In "Measure for Measure" we see substitution in the characters, in the role the characters take on, in the key events, in the language and in the themes. Substitution occurs throughout the entire play, which only adds to the overall meaning of the play, the nature of substitution in that it is a part of human life, especially in relation to the choices an individual must make in the course of . . . .

Philosophy's Unanswered Questions

Introduction

Western culture has always grappled with the meaning of life, whether there is or isn't a God, is he male or female, does science take precedence over this God, etc. Philosophers, in answering these questions, have made assumptions about the nature of reality. "These assumptions tend to be expressed in oppositional language, such as . . . .

Anniversary of NASDAQ

We are looking to this next phase with great excitement as we recently celebrated the 30th

Anniversary of NASDAQ's commencement of operations on February 8, 1971. We are now proceeding with our plans to develop an integrated order display facility - SuperMontage - that will form the backbone of our market as we transform NASDAQ into a national securities . . . .

David Herbert Lawrence was born in Eastwood, England in 1885. His father was a miner and his was mother a retired teacher. While young, Lawrence spent much of his time confined to his bed with tuberculosis. In this time he became very close to his mother. His mother was determined that he would not be a miner like his father and encouraged him to study. He won a scholarship to Nottingham High . . . .

Stars in Their Courses: The Gettysburg Campaign June-July 1863"

By Shelby Foote

About The Author

Shelby Foote was born in Mississippi. His father died when he was five leaving his mother to raise him alone, he was also an only child. He was a reader from his early years, mainly because he was so alone. He was a teenager during the Great Depression. At the age of thirteen . . . .

What does it mean to be human? This might seem to be a simple question, but that is probably because we have not thought very deeply about the issue. For decades physical anthropologists and other scholars have investigated this question. Their early efforts tended to take the form of trying to find one single trait that defined humans as different from all other species - whether it was our . . . .

We are so accustomed to thinking of William Wordsworth as the quintessential Romantic poet - a man in love with the idea of a simple life lived close to nature - that we are apt to overlook the fact that his relationship with nature is in fact a somewhat ambivalent one, or at least a complex one. While Wordsworth will always be known for the clarity and undiluted Romanticism of "Tintern Abbey . . . .

A Critical Analysis and Comparison of Plato's Republic and George Orwell's 1984

Philosophy could be defined as the highest level of true clarity and understanding human thought can aspire to. It would thus seem strange to compare the ideal philosophical kingdom of Plato's Republic with George Orwell's 1984. Plato's writings form the cornerstone of Western philosophy, while Orwell's text . . . .

Classic Literature for a New Generation

When one watches "Rambo: First Blood Part II" are we actually watching a contemporary version of the Iliad about the ferocity of Achilles on and off the battleground? When we watch Francis Ford Coppola's "Godfather" trilogy, are we really watching Aeschylus's Oresteia trilogy? Is today's "Jerry Springer" yesterday's Euripides' Hippolytus? Is . . . .

Mathematics Summer Institute Statement of Goals

Attending the 2002 Summer Institute for Elementary School Teachers represents and exciting opportunity for me to further explore my interest in teaching mathematics, as well as an opportunity for me to apply and share my knowledge and experience with like-minded educators.

I am a strongly committed to and enthusiastic about . . . .

Perhaps it is because I speak two languages that I feel I inhabit two different identities. Or are the reasons for my feeling this way more complex? It is difficult to say, but I do know that although I am only one person, inhabiting one body and one mind, in many ways, I feel I live in two different worlds, with two different identities. My language is more than a vocabulary, the words that I . . . .

Suturing in Film Theory and Other Narrative Practices

On a very literal level, to suture something is to sew something back together, usually imperfectly, usually with a substance that is alien to the body that is being altered—such as the doctor's suturing thread that stitches together an open wound. On a semiotic level, according to Jacques-Alain Miller, Miller's definition of suture . . . .

The Study of African American Vernacular English

There are a couple of theories as to the origin of African American Vernacular Englsh (AAVE). Some linguists believe that the language derives from West African languages. This dialect theory is based on the knowledge that most African Americans who were brought to the United States from Africa had to learn how to speak English by ear. . . . .

Nature of Cognition

Ever since Simon and Binet developed the first intelligence test in 1905, the field of psychology has maintained a strong interest in the nature of intelligence. How do we think? Why are some people better problem solvers than others? What is cognition, the ability to think about our environment? Why are some people consistently more able to use their brains to think . . . .

One of the most foundational mythological structures upholding the Greek system of belief in martial valor is the tale of the Trojan War. This tale has continued to hold ideological weight even today. Homer's tale of the sacking of Troy is one of heroism and honor, detailing both the greatness of military prowess as well as the difficulties of war. Although not a pro-war chronicle, it makes . . . .

The War on Terrorism: Is It Justified?

On September 11, 2001, two separate airliners, loaded with passengers, were flown into the two towers of the World Trade Center in New York City. This was soon followed by a similar act in Washington, D.C. that destroyed part of the Pentagon. Passengers on another plane attempted to retake it from hijackers, and that plane crashed into the . . . .

In the anthropological study "Body Ritual Among the Nacirema," Dr. Horace Miner describes an unusual culture among a group of people who live in Mexico.

The Nacirema have developed a complex social structure that involves both a strong economic incentive and a remarkable set of beliefs about the human body. Their beliefs about their bodies consume a significant amount of their economy. . . . .

Perceptions of Race and Racial Difference in Ancient Greece:

Classical Greek Ethnicity and its Expression/Conception in Aristotelian Philosophy

The world known to modern philosophy and anthropology is linearly far more expansive than that with which the Classical Greco-Roman world was familiar. Modern thought has spanned the globe, and pondered the mysteries of civilizations in . . . .

Constructing Gender Identity in the Poetry of Katherine Philips

Katherine Philips' poetry, superficially speaking, dealt with relationships and close interpersonal bonds between women, and this sort of subject matter would have been considered appropriate for a woman writer of her time. Most all women of the early 17th century lived in the shadows of patriarchy. Given their position in . . . .

teaching English to non-English speaking people for the purpose of conflict resolution

This paper presents a discussion regarding the importance of teaching English to non-English speaking people for the purpose of conflict resolution. The writer uses several examples of common conflicts in which the understanding of the English language would have made communication much easier. There . . . .

Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle are the most famous of the ancient Greek philosophers. All three of them have left a deep impact on the Western philosophy. In this paper we will look at the main points of their philosophies and the impact they left on us.

Socrates (469-399 BC)

Socrates was the first of the famous trio. He did not write any books and most of what we know about . . . .

Hmong (Asian) Culture

When America went to war in Vietnam, there were many victims. Among the most tragic were the Hmong people. Thousands fought and died for the Americans, taking orders and duties that were often the worst in the army, with little or no compensation. (Hmong FAQ: Immigration) When the Americans left, the veterans of their campaign in Laos underwent systematic . . . .

Communication in a Nursing Environment

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This research paper deals with the subject of ensuring effective communication between nursing staff, their patients, and the patient's family. It is proposed that understanding and utilizing body language would be an effective way for a nurse to improve communication.

The nature of communication and of the . . . .

The Three Paradigms of Spelling Instruction

Introduction

The three paradigms of spelling instruction are presented and compared in the article, 'Three paradigms of spelling instruction in grades 3 to 6' (Taylor-Heald, 1998).

In this article the three paradigms are identified as the traditional, the transitional, and the student-oriented. Each of these paradigms is a model . . . .

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