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BEING BROUGHT FROM AFRICA

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and discuss the poem "Being Brought From Africa," by Phillis Wheatley.

PHILLIS WHEATLEY

Phillis Wheatley came to America as a slave when she was a young girl; she was probably about eight-years-old when Mr. and Mrs. Wheatley purchased her. She lived in Boston with the family, serving as . . . .

Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle are the most famous of the ancient Greek philosophers. All three of them have left a deep impact on the Western philosophy. In this paper we will look at the main points of their philosophies and the impact they left on us.

Socrates (469-399 BC)

Socrates was the first of the famous trio. He did not write any books and most of what we know about . . . .

Hmong (Asian) Culture

When America went to war in Vietnam, there were many victims. Among the most tragic were the Hmong people. Thousands fought and died for the Americans, taking orders and duties that were often the worst in the army, with little or no compensation. (Hmong FAQ: Immigration) When the Americans left, the veterans of their campaign in Laos underwent systematic . . . .

Cross-Cultural Issues for African Americans

Chapter Three:

The chapter on African Americans primarily discusses three main cross-cultural issues. The first and most obvious one is the physical difference between white and black Americans, which is more pronounced than between Caucasians and any other minority group. This leads to an immediate, visual acknowledgment of difference . . . .

American Social Thought on Women's Rights

Abstract

This paper compares and contrasts the arguments in favor of women's rights made by three pioneering American feminists: Judith Sargent Murray, Sarah Grimke, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. This analysis reveals the centrality of religious argumentation to the feminism of all three. Murray and Grimke were both converts to varieties of . . . .

PHILLIS WHEATLEY

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and discuss Phillis Wheatley and the poem "Being Brought From Africa."

PHILLIS WHEATLEY

Phillis Wheatley came to America as a slave when she was a young girl; she was probably about eight-years-old when Mr. and Mrs. Wheatley purchased her. She lived in Boston with the family, serving as a . . . .

Is Cloning Right?

We are not quite in a brave new world yet. On the contrary, we are in a decidedly timid new world. For the first time in recorded history, humans are beginning to have within their own hands all the building blocks of life. This is not the story of mythical Pygmalion. It is not even the fictional story of Dr. Frankenstein, inspired by a feminist's fear of childbirth. . . . .

Race is one of the most bedeviling of anthropological characteristics. The concept, with the barest tips of its roots in biological realities and the rest of the plant firmly grafted to cultural and sociological constructs, is one of the first concepts that anthropologists dealt with vigorously in terms of the history of the profession. Ideas about race both helped establish anthropology as a . . . .

Unless we have thought about it a great deal, we have probably always thought about history as being either more-or-less truthful or more-or-less mendacious. Under the former category we would put most of the kind of history that we learn in school. This is the kind of history that we believe to be accurate, written from the best intentions of shedding light on the past. What errors enter into . . . .

Unconventional Warfare: The Mujahidin of Afghanistan

Resistance is not futile. It was one of the lessons learned from the Soviet Union's invasion of Afghanistan: that any resistance force can counter effectively against a powerful aggressor. Resistance - with the proper tools, strategy, and determination - can countermeasure any unwanted entity. The anti-Soviet forces in Afghanistan not . . . .

Shakespeare's "Hamlet" is perhaps one of the most famous and hotly debated literary artifacts ever written. However, because literary critics and historians have discussed the work so often, it is easy to forget that Shakespeare wrote his tragedy as a play to be performed in the context of an Elizabethan production, to an Elizabethan audience. It is a refreshing antidote to some of more modern . . . .

Supporting a Woman's Right to Choose

Fact Sheet: "Abortion is Pro-life Frequently A"If the right of privacy means anything, it is the right of the individual, married or single, to be free from unwarranted governmental intrusion into matters so fundamentally affecting a person as the decision whether to bear or beget a child."

Eisenstadt v. Baird, 1972

In the most basic of . . . .

Freud's Religion and Horney's neurosis

This paper looks at the works of Freud and his book The Future of an Illusion and Horney's Our Conflicts: A Constructive Theory of Neurosis, discussing how they interact and how Horney looks at neuroses whilst Freud looks at the format of how religion is formed as an illusion to a higher figure

Freud's Religion and Horney's neurosis: a match . . . .

The problem of evil and suffering has been an issue since the beginning of time. Carl Jung has written passionately and eloquently about the possibility and impossibility of transcending this problem.

According to Jung's reasons for this problem was that God was a schmuck towards Job (and by extension to all innocents who suffer from 'acts of God') due to His not being fully conscious. . . . .

concept of a Creator in Christianity and the views of Sigmund Freud and William James

This paper discusses the concept of a Creator in Christianity and also focuses on the views held by Sigmund Freud and William James on this subject. While Christianity believes firmly in the existence of Creator, Freud maintains that this concept has originated from man's deep-rooted neurosis. James on . . . .

The Myth of the First Amendment

Introduction

The concept of "Big Brother" surveying all our actions and censoring what we hear and what we know is something that goes against the very conception of American society. The centuries old fear of control motivates the people such that they believe in the ideology of freedom of speech over anything else. The First Amendment to us, is . . . .

Thanks to the bold work of the Federalist Papers, the US Constitution was ratified in the late 1780's by the original 13 states. But this new nation would experience a myriad of other changes by the turn of the century. With a new political system, westward expansionism and manifest destiny would guide the new American spirit. Of the most significant transformations on the American landscape . . . .

culture of Sinhala elite and Shiv Sena in post-colonial Asia

This paper considers the issue of culture within the context of post colonial Asia. The paper examines the cultural strategies of two cultures; the Sinhala elite and Shiv Sena and how these groups developed and emerged, redefining their own identity.

Religion and politics old ways destroyed by new regimes and ideologies . . . .

What Traits Make Strong Leaders in the United States?

This paper presents a detailed presentation about the rulers of America today. The writer explores what makes a leader and then uses examples of current American leaders to illustrate those traits. The paper takes the reader in an in-depth tour of leadership roles by today's societal standards.

LEADERS OF THE UNITED STATES . . . .

History

Beginning of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

Judaism

Hebrew history, as told by the Hebrews, begins in Mesopotamia, in the cities of Ur in the south and Haran in the north. With Abraham, the story of the Hebrews begins, and it is clearly stated that Hebrew origins lay outside Canaan. The command to leave his ancestral home and journey to Canaan was accompanied by . . . .

Supreme Court Striking Down Taboos

The American populace looks to its state and federal legislatures to create the laws, and then to its executive branch to enforce the laws; but the greatest popular respect is accorded to the Supreme Court which ultimately rules on what a person may or may not do. That is why the amorphous and buck-passing decision in Bush v. Gore left so much of the . . . .

What is it that Jews will face after death? How do Jewish ideas about the afterlife affect their attitudes toward death itself? This is a relatively more complicated question to answer than how the attitudes held by Christians about the afterlife affect their views toward death because in the case of Judaism there is no small amount of ambiguity.

Jewish beliefs about death cannot be . . . .

William James was a prominent psychologist and philosopher in the early 20th century. Presently, James' work is outdated, but only in the sense that Galileo's or Darwin's work is outdated. Both Darwin and Galileo were originators in their respective fields. Their work served as a basis for many incredible discoveries and innovations in the modern world. The work of James, too, serves as a . . . .

The novel Midaq Alley by Naguib Mahfouz is a portrayal of several individuals living within a particular section of Cairo. Almost all of the characters are Muslim. Several are middle class but others, the most striking of the narrative, are quite poor and simply struggle to survive. Through creating such variety of characters from different social stratum, whom all meet in the context of the . . . .

Geography, the Study of the Earth

What are the most important things you have learned in geography this semester and how does a knowledge of geography have survival value for American citizens?"

Many people might think geography is a boring and unimportant subject—they are wrong. The first role of Geography is the study of our earth, countries, landmasses, water, minerals and . . . .

Inner Truth and Outer Truth

The forefathers of our country were not known for their emotional clarity. Neither were they known for expressing publicly their private sense of self. Those who became known at all were known for their hard work and dedication to the public causes meant to benefit the common good. We can perceive them only through our own eyes, much changed by the passage of . . . .

A Timely Subversion: The Role of Politics and Pressure in the Nazi Rise to Power

Following the end of World War I, the people of Germany felt the consequences of their loss coupled with the reverberations of the American stock market crash. The effects of the Great Depression only trickled down slowly to the small German town of "Thalburg," the fictitious name of a real town whose . . . .

Pearl Jam's "Do the Evolution" is a modern take on the evolution of mankind. Written from a social perspective, the song critiques the conceit that humans are somehow "superior" because they are the most highly evolved, or complex organism on Earth. The complete lyrics for Do the Evolution are listed at the end of this essay.

Pearl Jam's frontman, Eddie Venter, has quickly become the . . . .

Antigone

Sophocles, an Athenian politician and dramatist, wrote Antigone and Oedipus the King, two famous works, known for the connection of tragedy between generations of the characters. Indeed, Antigone's fate is shaped not only through her own actions, but through Oedipus' sin as well. Any analysis of Antigone is therefore incomplete without first taking into account its linkages to . . . .

BLACK HISTORY

EFFECTS OF CAPITALISM ON BLACK ECONOMICS

History of Slavery and Capitalism

Capitalism Effects on Black Economics in the United States

Capitalism Effects on Black Economics in Cuba

Conclusion

References

BLACK HISTORY

EFFECTS OF CAPITALISM ON BLACK ECONOMICS

History of Slavery and Capitalism

The ancient slave . . . .

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