Essay - Theater (Theatre)...


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The term "self" is difficult to define but usually involves the inner life of the individual, the psychological dimension of human existence as opposed to the outward, physical form. The self is conceived as a creature of consciousness, a mind capable of thought and able to engage in deliberate action. A self is capable of self-consciousness, which means it recognizes its own ability to think . . . .

For many students, the university experience is not simply a matter of academic induction into the larger world. Colleges located in the heart of bustling metropolitan centers as well as those buffered by less economically healthy urban areas provide some more sheltered suburban students with their first intimate glimpse of less affluent communities and cultures. It is with this in mind that . . . .

Abstract

This research paper discusses some fundamental facets of the historical developments of video streaming surrounding the presentation of products and services on the Internet, that is involving Internet advertising. The reference page appends five sources in APA format.

Computer Technology

Education has done wonders and has considerably contributed towards a better . . . .

We all know that the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution guarantees to us freedom of speech - promises to each citizen and resident of the United States that the government will not tell us what we can or cannot say. Right?

Well, mostly. While in general Americans are protected by the First Amendment so that we can say whatever wise or witty or stupid or offensive thing that we . . . .

The Salem Witch Trials were an atrocity in a period of American history. Several young girls, who had heard tales of the supernatural from a West Indian slave, claimed to be possessed by the devil and accused three women of witchcraft. Put in that position, the three women, in turn, named others in false confessions (Merriam-Webster 1416).

This caused hysteria much like Joseph McCarthy . . . .

TAMBOURINES TO GLORY"

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this paper is to introduce, discuss, and analyze the book/play "Tambourines to Glory," by Langston Hughes. Specifically it will discuss the significance of the work, and what Hughes was trying to say through his fiction.

TAMBOURINES TO GLORY

This is a comic book about religion and morals, not often subjects of comedy . . . .

Making the Familiar-Unfamiliar

Part of the process of staging a play is to make the familiar unfamiliar, to isolate elements so as to suggest reality, the familiar, in an unfamiliar way. Plays do not take place in the real world but in a created world, a world set in one isolated spot (the stage) with several specific individuals isolated from real life (characters) interacting in a . . . .

Julius Caesar has remained one of the most poignant stories about a power struggle in the English language. It is precisely because personality cults have consistently eroded institutions of public office that this play will always remain relevant. The play illustrates not only that a popular yet unorthodox leader may sweep away democratic and free institutions, but that killing such a leader . . . .

The Dragons Village"

On first glance, it would seem that the poverty of rural China would be an ideal place for individuals to sow communist ideology. The individuals in question were oppressed by crushing poverty, and had been treated in an inequitable fashion by the city dwelling, educated and urban classes by decades. However, to Chen Yuan-tsung's autobiographical work historical . . . .

Victorian New Woman: Shaw's Views

Victiorian New Woman

In their analysis of the 'sexualized visions of change and exchange' which mark the end of the nineteenth century (Smith, Marshall University)1 and the uncertain formation of the twentieth, Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar read the leitmotif of the late-Victorian New Woman as one fantasy among many, part of a sequence of . . . .

This paper presents a detailed exploration of ghosts in two literary works. The Spanish Tragedy and Hamlet each have a ghost which guides and drives the action of the story. The writer works to compare and contrast the ghosts in each story and tell how they relate to the story. There were two sources used to complete this paper.

INTRODUCTION

Throughout history writers have used . . . .

Technology, Social Order, and Change

The interaction between technology and humanity is much like the relationship between life, and art. Some say life imitates art. Others insist that art is a reflection of life, and illustrates what it perceives around it. Technology can be perceived as a series of locks and dikes through which the currents of humanity flow. Others insist that mankind . . . .

The Success of German Fascism

Fascism is arguably the most influential and controversial political ideology in modern history, and continues to be a fascinating topic for political study and discussion. Yet, despite fascism's worldwide existence and its responsibility for the development of numerous groups and political movements, Germany remains only one of two countries (the other . . . .

In the play For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow Is Enuf by Ntozake Shange is a play featuring seven women, and the tales they tell are all related to different periods in time. The women recount aspects of their lives primarily as memory, showing that they are bound with time to the degree that they are remembering it and acting it out for the audience once more, . . . .

To be the First Lady is to live in the spotlight. Like it or not, the First Lady is a role model for thousands of women, not just in the United States, but also worldwide. What she says, what she does, how she conducts herself in certain situations, even how she chooses to decorate the White House—these things and more are all examined by the people and the press and given close scrutiny. . . . .

In his essay "There's no such Thing as Free Speech, and it's a Good thing too," Stanley Fish suggests that the idea that we have "free speech" is a mirage. To make his point, he redefines free speech not as the right to say what we want to say free from governmental punishment to a perception of "free speech" meaning speech not tied to any belief system. In addition he describes the concept of . . . .

THOREAU'S WALDEN

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and discuss Transcendentalism in Henry David Thoreau's works, especially "Walden." In particular, it will discuss how Thoreau's "Walden" fits and does not fit the definition of Transcendentalism, and how he viewed the Brook Farm Experiment.

TRANSCENDENTALISM AND THOREAU

The fact is I am a mystic . . . .

The Positives and Negatives from a Century of Aviation

Introduction

Little did the Wright brothers know, on December 17, 1903, when they successfully tested their flying machine at Kitty Hawk, what an influential industry they were launching. They could not have known in their wildest dreams that ninety-nine years later, an airport called Chicago O'Hare would facilitate some 383, . . . .

The Power of Propaganda

In Germany, fascism took the form of Nazism; an ideology that prospered in the years immediately following the First World War, until an Allied in World War II brought it to an end. During this period Nazism's emphasis on nationalism, and in particular its desire for national rebirth, enabled it to attract and maintain populist support. Also, in contrast to the . . . .

Precision Guided Munitions

Introduction

In the history of twentieth century warfare, one of the most significant developments was the emergence of the precision weapon. This weapon is designed and directed against a single target. It either relies on external guidance or its own guidance system.1The precision weapon that has been launched from aircraft, submarines, ships and land . . . .

Uncle Tom's Cabin - Fiction as a Catalyst for Fact

Background: The Origins of a Living Document

Introduction

Stage Night

North and South Polarized: Critics Respond

The Abolitionist Debates

The Tom Caricature

The Greatest Impact

Works Cited

Works Consulted

Background: The Origins of a Living Document

In her own words, . . . .

Exploring Interactivity in Video Games and Movies

Abstract

Information technology has changed the way we live in today's world. Everything from our television to our cell phones are connected through network medium. Computers define the way the way we do many of the things in our lives, such as, how we maintain our bills and expenses to even conducting business activities online . . . .

Bring in Da Noise, Bring in Da Funk:

Funky Display of Living Theater

The title The Empty Space, of Peter Brook's book on acting theory, performance, and improvisation, refers to the fact that all theatrical productions begin with a single, empty stage. This stage is then filled with the imagination (or lack thereof) of the actors, director, and other members of the cast and crew . . . .

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf' by Edward Albee

Summary: This is a paper on the play 'Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf' by Edward Albee.

A three-part theater play, 'Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf' by Edward Albee presents a typical insight on the disturbed and somewhat revengeful life of a married couple, George and Martha. The era when the play was first performed is that of the . . . .

Compare and Contrast: Renting vs. Theatre

As the price of a movie ticket rises, movie-watching often becomes a question of: "Is it a renter?" The questions of what makes a movie "a renter" may be only an expression of the viewer's opinion that the quality of the movie does not warrant the price of a movie ticket. Assuming that it is generally more expensive to go to the show than to . . . .

The Effects of the Media on Terrorism

Introduction

Acts of anti-American terrorism are becoming increasingly common, and more and more are occurring on American soil, according to Columbia political scientist Brigitte L. Nacos (Nacos, 1995). According to Nacos, the rise in terrorism is not a matter of flawed national security. It has more to do with the success that terrorists . . . .

Greek Drama and its Effects on Drama Today

It has been said that the Ancient Greeks "took their entertainment very seriously and used drama as a way of investigating the world they lived in, and what it meant to be human" (PBS, 2002). This is perhaps the greatest contribution Greek Drama has made to the developing art of film and theatre in the modern world. Intertwining philosophy and . . . .

THE MISSING REEL

The Untold Story of the Lost Inventor of Moving Pictures by Christopher Rawlence

History as a concept was created within the human mind thousands of years ago. It most likely arose from tales told around flickering campfires of great deeds performed by fathers and mothers, dangerous beasts which were conquered, nourishing plants and fruits which were discovered . . . .

Once called "the greatest single work in the English language" by music historian Stanley Sadie, Handel's Messiah continues to receive lavish and popular praise (Barber, 1994, p. 2). The English oratorio remains one of the most recognizable works of music, and earned its composer considerable fame and fortune during his lifetime. Born on the 23rd of February of 1685, Georg Friederich Handel . . . .

Applied Drama

Because of its focus on the actor or player, and making the environment as authentic as possible, applied drama has proved itself particularly useful in the field of education. The applications of the techniques used in applied drama have been numerous. Below the usefulness of drama techniques developed by Augusto Boal and others for training in the business environment is . . . .

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