Home  >  Subjects  >  current page My Profile

Essays on "Energy / Power"  |  Term Papers 1-40

 1 2 3 . . . Last › Filter Options:  

Why Clean Renewable Energy Is Imperative to Our Future

Renewable Energy The United States is facing a seminal moment in terms of energy policy. Since 1970, the percentage of our oil that has been imported has increased from 24% to 70% (Pickens, 2008). While some of this oil comes from close allies such as Canada, Mexico, and the United Kingdom the majority of it comes from producers with whom…

Pages: 8  |  Thesis  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 10


Solar Energy

Solar Energy The threats posed by our relationship to energy has given rise to some devastating results on a global and a personal scale like human-induced climate change, famine, poverty and cycles of deforestation; all these while on our overzealous appetite search for energy. Global economic, environmental and social pressures are driving the human race to search for a better…

Pages: 10  |  Essay  |  Style: Harvard  |  Sources: 7


Solar Energy

Solar Energy As typical hydrocarbon materials are significantly challenging and costly to draw out, energy businesses need to alter their approach in order to fulfil the needs of an expanding populace progressively depending on power. Renewable resource has actually become the focus for numerous energy businesses as they look to a 'greener' future. Whether this enhancing dedication has actually come…

Pages: 10  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 6


Augmenting Traditional Electric Power With Solar Power Is a Wise Investment in South Florida

Science Augmenting Traditional Electric Power with Solar Power is a Wise Investment in South Florida Solar is a powerful source of energy that can be utilized to heat, cool, and light homes and businesses. This is for the reason that more energy from the sun falls on the earth in one hour than is utilized by everybody in the world…

Pages: 5  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 10


Human Powered Electronics

¶ … Marketing a Human-Powered Electricity Generating Device Given the pending power doom, there aren't nearly as many mad scientists out there figuring out alternatives to the battery as one would wish. -- Steve Morgensterndan Clinton and Suzanne Kantrakirschner, 2004 The proliferation of electronic-powered mobile devices such as cell phones, personal digital assistants, and iPods continues to increase and current…

Pages: 20  |  Thesis  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 15


Implementation of Solar Power

Government Policies and Solar Power Systems Government regulations and policies affect renewable power generation a great deal, as is revealed through a brief review of the history of governmental policy in regards to power generation. Federal, state, and local governments support solar power creation, progress and improvement through a broad assortment of strategy and regulatory instruments. As the cost of…

Pages: 8  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 8


Renewable Energy the Law of

c. Solar energy i. Pros: solar energy produces no pollution of the environment, less expensive if not counting the cost of solar panels and their instillation, the government offers tax credits up to $2,000 for using solar energy, you can receive energy credits if the solar panels produce more energy than you consume, solar energy will never run out whereas nonrenewable sources are quickly dwindling, in addition solar energy produces no noise pollution as the systems are completely silent (Bocchine 2007). ii. Cons: the initial cost of the solar panels can be cost prohibitive, solar energy is subject to climate variability based upon weather and the hours of sunlight within a region which will impact that wattage produced, some people argue that the panels are aesthetically unpleasant, and the solar energy panels can only absorb energy in the day meaning electricity used at night must rely on stored energy within the panels (Bocchine 2007). d. Wind power i. Pros: completely clean energy source which does not require drilling or mining for materials, renewable and sustainable, costs are low, abundant supply of wind available, the power is essentially free once the structures have been paid for, can be…

Pages: 2  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Nuclear Power -- the Future of Electricity

Nuclear Power -- the Future of Electricity Generation Nuclear power production was first introduced in the United States and was touted as the future of energy. Nuclear power production has a wide range of benefits that it can offer the nation. Although there are some formidable risks in regard to nuclear power that have been illustrated by many disasters since its inception, modern technology and advanced safety management can now mitigate many of the concerns that plagued previous generations of nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the risks that are being presented by climate change and the exponentially expanding amount of greenhouse gas pollution far exceed the risks that are proposed by the use of nuclear generated power. The time has come for a reevaluation of nuclear power and its place in powering a modern nation. Traditional sources of power generation are damaging the Earth's ability to regenerate its natural systems while alternative sources cannot meet the modern demand for power. Although nuclear power has had a mixed track record in the past, the changing environmental conditions demand that this clean and relatively safe technology be reconsidered. This paper will look at many of the advantages that nuclear power has over alternative methods of power production. Coal Coal is a nonrenewable fossil fuel that has powered much of the development of the United States since it was first used for electric power generation. Even today there are over 600 plants across the country consuming 900 million tons per year to produce 40% of U.S. electricity (Congressional Digest). The use of coal in the United States has become so widespread because it is abundant in the country and the U.S. holds some of the largest reserves of coal in the world. It is estimated that, even with growing demand, the United States has enough coal to last over two hundred years based on current consumption and production patterns. However, despite the prevalence of coal in the country, the percentage of electricity generated from coal in relations to other fuel sources is continually decline and is expected to continue doing so into the future. Coal fired plants are estimate to contribute approximately a third of all greenhouse gas emissions and contributes as much as pollution as all sources of all transportation sources combined (Congressional Digest). Therefore, coal fired plants have come under a lot of scrutiny for their environmental impacts and many older coal…

Pages: 4  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4


Alternatives to Traditional Fossil Fuels,

Current estimates are that there are on the order of three million different species of algae, which is approximately one hundred times the number of species of known land plants. They can occur at the microscopic scale as unicellular cyanobacteria or microalgae, all the way to multicellular macroalgae like giant kelp. The advantage of algae as an energy source is that it grows easily and prolifically in any kind or quality of water, including salt, fresh, or brackish water. This means that algae provide not only an abundant and perpetually renewable source of energy biofeedstock, but also represents a source with extremely high genetic and ecological diversity. Cultivation of algae is environmentally beneficial, as algae currently account for 50% of the world's oxygen production, but constitutes less than 1% of overall plant biomass on the planet (Valone) Wind-generated electric power is presently one of the fastest-growing new energy sources. Since wind is a byproduct of solar heating of the earth's atmosphere, it is an indirect form of solar power. Wind generators harness the kinetic energy from moving air by using wind turbines to convert this energy into mechanical and subsequently electrical power. The environmental concerns related to wind power are restricted to the relatively small byproducts of constructing the generators themselves, and a somewhat greater concern regarding the rate of avian and bat injuries and mortalities resulting from the large, exposed turbine blades moving at high speeds in their habitat. In addition there are some concerns about the visual impact of proliferating numerous large terrestrial and oceanic wind farms. Aside from these concerns, wind power constitutes a perpetually renewed, cost free source of energy that cannot be depleted, and does not contribute to greenhouse gas emissions or other air pollutants. The entry barriers to wind power production involve primarily regulatory and land acquisition challenges, but more prominently high start-up capital investments required for machinery and installation site preparation. Once installed and operating, wind power ultimately offsets the harmful emissions and carbon dioxide production of energy produced equivalent fossil fuel methods, and eliminates the troublesome waste generated by nuclear fission methods. ("Wind Energy Guide") It is worth noting there has been significant debate surrounding whether nuclear energy should be considered a renewable resource. It was asserted by the former U.S. Bush Administration that the net creation of fissile plutonium fuel using breeder reactors to supply nuclear power generators constituted a renewable…

Pages: 4  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4


Solar Panel (Energy) in Saudi

Solar Panel (Energy) in Saudi Arabia Solar panels in Saudi Arabia Solar Panel Energy in Saudi Arabia Solar energy has been generally known as energy that is produced by the sun heat and its collection is done in a flat plate collector known as solar panels. Then the energy undergoes conversion to come up with electricity in most cases. For…

Pages: 9  |  Research Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 10


Nuclear Energy

The expectations of increased cost estimates and lack of adequate construction and engineering skills prove that building and maintaining a nuclear power plant is relatively a more expensive process that would require costly taxpayer subsidies. For example, the development of two new nuclear power plant reactors in southeast Florida cost between $6 billion and $9 billion for each plant. Therefore,…

Pages: 8  |  Research Paper  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 4


Sources of Community Energy

That can be an issue, but it is a small one when compared to other energy sources that require nearly complete destruction of the natural environment in order to be useful (Lovins, 2011; Makower, Pernick, & Wilder, 2009). Additionally, the sources of power that Willows is using will not be used up by their consumption, so there is no concern…

Pages: 8  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4


Alternative Energy Conservation Planning

¶ … energy industry is heavily dependent on fossil fuel production, consumption, and technology. In order to better understand a more sustainable, environmentally friendly way forward, it is necessary to examine some of the more conventional alternative energy technologies available for use. Solar, wind, nuclear, natural gas, ethanol, hybrid, and hydrogen technologies all have their costs and benefits, and understanding…

Pages: 10  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 7


Transition to Renewable Energy Since the Industrial

¶ … Transition to Renewable Energy Since the Industrial Revolution, modern society has been dependent on fossil fuels and petroleum products for energy to power the many inventions and technological developments that have made life so much easier in the developed world. However, the planet does not have unlimited supplies of natural energy-producing resources. The oil that we have been mining from deep underneath the ground for approximately two centuries cannot be replenished by the natural processes that accounted for its formation originally. That is because petroleum is a natural byproduct of the decaying vegetations and biological life that lived on the planet millions of years ago. The gasoline that powers today's automobiles literally comes from the bodies of dinosaurs and other living creatures that lived long before the emergence of Homo Sapiens roughly one million years ago. The tremendous rate of technological growth, especially in the United States since the 19th century has already used up the largest available portion of the planet's entire oil reserves. At the current rate of consumption, the world will likely completely run out of fossil fuel-based energy source before the end of this century. Moreover, the use of fossil fuels for energy generates large amounts of airborne carbon and myriad other byproducts, some of which are toxic. These carbon emissions are believed by most scientists to be a principal cause of environmental damage as well as global warming. In addition to the problems caused by oil shortages, there are very dangerous geopolitical consequences of the fact that oil reserves are not distributed uniformly throughout the world. Instead, they are concentrated in the Middle East where they have made several nations that are otherwise largely backward socially to become tremendously wealthy and influential on a global scale. Throughout the 20th century, much of American foreign policy was a reflection of the need to maintain favorable relations with the Arab oil kingdoms. Today, when radical Islamic factions are engaged in worldwide terrorism against American and Western interests, the continued dependence on their crude oil products are capable of being used as a weapon against us. The……

Pages: 2  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Wind Power, Farms, & Turbines:

Wind Power Wind Farms and Wind Turbines: An Examination of Their Role as a Sustainable Alternative Energy Source Wind Farm in Boulder County, Wyoming Wind Turbines at Burbo Bank in the Mouth of the River Mersey Respective Percentage of U.S. Renewable Energy Consumption, 2004 Identifying sustainable and alternative energy sources has become a national priority in recent years, but the…

Pages: 9  |  Thesis  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 5


Energy Crisis of 1973 in 1973, OPEC,

Energy Crisis of 1973 In 1973, OPEC, the cartel of the most oil-rich Middle-Eastern countries responsible for producing the majority of the world's crude oil, cut off exports of petroleum to Western nations in reaction to what they saw as the Israeli bias of the United States in recent Arab-Israeli conflicts. "Although the oil embargo would not ordinarily have made a tremendous impact on the U.S., panicking investors and oil companies caused a gigantic surge in oil prices. The situation, caused more by fear and irrationality than any firm economic basis, turned out to be one of the most memorable of the 1970s. Those who can remember the so-called 'Mideast oil crisis' also remember long lines at the gas pump due to petroleum shortages and high gasoline prices" ("The Mideast Oil Crisis," Energy Through History, 2007). A realist international relations theorist would have stressed a 'power politics' solution to the crisis, such as pressuring OPEC member nations to release their supplies of crude. This might be accomplished levying economic sanctions against the Arab members and by forcing U.S. investors and oil companies to keep their prices down……

Pages: 1  |  Term Paper  |  Style: Harvard  |  Sources: 2


Offshore Wind Energy Wind Energy

371-372). 2. Wind Power: "air that is in motion in relation to the earth's surface, especially in a horizontal direction." 3. Wind Energy: "the energy contained in the movement of air masses; in human energy use traditionally captured by means of the sails of a ship or the vanes of a windmill, and currently by mechanical blades similar to air…

Pages: 20  |  "Introduction" Chapter  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 15


Windmills as a Source of Green Power in Hawaii

Windmills as a Source of Green Power for Hawaii We must remember that not all resources are renewable. Renewable resources are those defined as resources that can, through natural processes, be replaced regularly (for instance, oxygen in the atmosphere is produced by the earth's plants; water is typically replaced through weather patterns, and historically, many food resources were considered to be renewable (a balance of resources were taken per year so that the offspring would replace those used.) Nonrenewable resources, however, are finite, and not replaceable within a realistic time frame (e.g. natural gas, coal, etc.). It is interesting to note that many so-called renewable resources can also move into the category of non-renewable due to overuse (overfishing, deforestation, loss of ground water, etc.). (Khanna, 2003). The Turning Point -- Transition to Renewable Energy -- The bleak reality is that the age of oil has dominated global energy needs for the past century. This has caused a number of social, cultural, and economic issues. While there may be enough oil to last fifty to one-hundred years, the ecological consequences of doing so would change the entire sphere of quality of life and health issues. It is thus necessary from an economic and ecological perspective to transition to renewable energy sources; after all, the same technological revolution and expertise that has so transformed the Internet and global communication paradigm can also change the way humans use and store wind, biomass, and solar energy -- which are 6,000 times more abundant on an annual basis than fossil fuels (WorldWatch Institute, intro). The 21st century must become a move away from fossile fuels, much as the 20th century was shaped by them. The computer chip market proved that conventional markets can shift quickly and decisively as lifestyles and market demand changes. It often seems that people vote with their pocketbooks, and if fossil-fuel prices rise enough, the impetus to change will likely increase. Summary of Renewable Energy Resources - By definition, a renewable energy resource is one that can be constantly used because it replenshishes itself. For instance, wind power, solar power, geothermal energy, hydropower, bioenergy, wave (ocean) energy all are renewable but have not been developed enough yet because of the historical use of inexpensive fossil fuels. Wind power, of course, has been used for centuries to power sailing vessels, windmills, etc., but the idea of modern wind power is a manner…

Pages: 3  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Resources and the Environment

¶ … Environment Pros and Cons of Solar Power The United States currently depends overwhelmingly on coal, oil, and natural gas -- fossil fuels -- to supply its energy needs, which are massive. All of these fuels are not found in quantities that allow them to continue forever. They are nonrenewable. When they are gone, they are gone. It would…

Pages: 9  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 7


International Business and Politics

International Business and Politics In the last several years, outsourcing has become an integral part for helping a firm to decrease their costs and improve productivity. However, depending upon the region, this could have an adverse effect on their bottom line results. In the case of the GE plant, there is intense competition between the Philippines and the Ukraine. To fully understand the benefits that the Ukraine has to offer requires focusing on: the business environment and actual firms that are located in the country. Together, these different elements will highlight the strengths of the Ukraine for foreign direct investors. The Ukraine's Business Environment The Ukraine is focused on energy imports to meet the demand of businesses and households. In 2009, a dispute over the price of energy resulted in a temporary embargo from Russia. However, the country was able to resolve these disputes and now has a ten-year agreement in place. At the same time, the economy is vulnerable to shocks from the global economy. This is because the nation has tremendous amounts of natural resources that are used in the production of steel, manufactured goods and agriculture. Evidence of this can be seen with the overall rates of GDP growth from 2009 to 2011 (which is illustrated in the below table). ("Ukraine") Ukraine's GDP Growth from 2009 to 2011 Year Rate of Growth 2009 -14.8% 2010 4.1% 2011 5.1% ("Ukraine") These figures are showing how the Ukraine's economy is dependent upon changes that are occurring inside the global marketplace. Moreover, the Ukraine has eliminated all imports / exports and business related taxes. This is designed to help fuel foreign direct investment. This means that firms that are looking to relocate to the region can reduce their costs of importing critical materials. The combination of these factors makes the country a popular location for many companies that are seeking to reduce their costs. ("Ukraine") Examples of Firms that have located to the Ukraine The plant the GE is planning on opening is going to concentrate on alternative forms of energy. The Ukraine is good location because of the low costs, favorable tax structure and other players who have been establishing operations. As far as foreign direct investment is concerned, the country is currently home to the largest alternate energy related power plant in all of Europe (which is owned by Activ Solar). Moreover,……

Pages: 3  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Fuel Cells in Green Engineering

And, the technology was understood decades before that. Water as a fuel source is unimaginative though. Engineers want to see a problem and determine how they can make not only that process better, but how they can derive other solutions out of the one they are working on. Like a drug that has multiple uses, fuel cell technology may be the most green innovation currently being proposed because of its multiple possible applications. As said previously, fuel cells have generally used water as a hydrogen source, but that process is being eclipsed by another idea. In the movie Back to the Future, doc Brown goes onto the future and re-equips his car with a fuel tank that takes trash and converts it to fuel. Modern microbial fuel cells may not quite live up to putting an old banana peel and a used beer can into the tank, but they operate on the principle of turning waste products into fuel. Microbial fuel cells produce motive force in the same way as a traditional fuel cell, but they can use waste products such as farm runoff in the production of hydrogen. One of the greatest problems of the twentieth, and now twenty-first, century has been that farms produce so much waste that they are a negative impact on the environment. The Chesapeake Bay is becoming a forest of algae and dead fish because of the farm runoff along the waterway. If this waste could be put to some practical use, then it would help the environment and become useful. The following is a shocking statement: "The waste stream from one cow may hold 3,000 watts of potential power, but the electrical power required per cow on a dairy farm is only about 150 watts. This means that a first-generation MFC would have to be only 5% efficient to decouple the farm from external electrical infrastructure" (Birch) Of course this is largely conjecture at this point, but what a boon for farmers and the environment alike. One dairy cow could potentially supply the needs of an entire farm. That is, if the fuel cells were 100% efficient, which they will never be. But they are much more efficient than regular means of electricity generation. This means that many areas could completely go off of the electrical grid which is powered by coal plants and nuclear plants. This green savings for the environment, in…

Pages: 3  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


Economics of Oil and Gas

The critical thing is the difference between annual additions to the capacity of oil production and the annual rate of decline of the production from the wells that are in existence. Since OPEC was formed in 1960, it has never been shy when it comes to flexing its energy fuelled power over the west. OPEC is likely to loose its market share in the years to come as their days of dominance in the oil industry are soon coming to an end. When bluntly put we can say that OPEC's power has been well and significantly reduced. Its decline has been fueled by U.S. And Israeli's gas as well as oil revolutions. Oil depletion is also not making it easy for the survival of OPEC. Its power is decreasing and in the next few years it will be completely powerless (Flynn, 20130. It is beyond any doubt that Saudi has enormous oil reserves, for a long time now the country has been a world leader in the production of oil. However the development of U.S. shale has outplayed the oil production of Saudi Arabia and now all signs show that Saudi is desperate to keep their number one ranking in the world as leaders in oil production. Furthermore the meteoric rise in U.S. production is linked with technological developments which Saudi can not keep up with. Therefore even though Saudi Arabia has enormous reserves it is not expected that it will significantly expand its oil production capacity. Reference Campbell, C. (1998) Peak Oil: A Turning for Mankind. Retrieved April 14, 2014 from http://www.greatchange.org/ov-campbell,peakoil_turning_for_mankind.html . Campbell J. & Laherrere J., (1998). The end of cheap oil. Retrieved April 14,2014 from http://dieoff.org/page140.htm Jamail D., (2011).The Scourge of 'peak oil.' Retrieved April 14,2014 from http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2011/07/201172081613634207.html Flynn P., (2013). OPEC shudders as shale revolution could spell demise Retrieved April 14, 2014 from http://www.futuresmag.com/2013/03/14/opec-shudders-as-shale-revolution-could-spell-demi…

Pages: 2  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4


Photosynthesis vs. Solar Cells: Producing Natural and

Photosynthesis vs. solar cells: Producing natural and human-Generated energy Photosynthesis, an organically-occurring chemical process, is used to sustain essential life forces. Without the ability to convert light into energy, plants (and in some forms of bacteria and simple organisms known as protistans) would not be able to create the necessary sugar compounds required for them to grow and flourish. Without plants, animal life on the earth would not exist as we know it. This is because one of the byproducts released in photosynthesis is oxygen, while plants 'feed' off carbon dioxide to complete the chemical reactions of photosynthesis (Farabee 2007). Photosynthesis in plants converts the light of the sun into a usable source of energy for living organisms in a natural fashion. Solar cells likewise convert the natural light of the sun into energy. However, the use of semiconductor-based solar cells, while useful, is a non-necessary, human-generated process designed to increase the convenience of modern life at relatively low cost. One common example of this technology is found in solar-powered calculators. Solar cells also convert the sun's heat into electrical energy. Because the conversion is not a chemical process like photosynthesis, no necessary gases are released and no food is generated for the organism. It should be noted that in photosynthesis some electrical transfers do occur. "The first two steps of photosynthesis involve capturing photons released from the sun and using that energy to create a flow of electrons. From there, photosynthesis involves using that electrical energy to create chemical energy, from which ultimately the products of photosynthesis are created" in the form of glucose (Stier 2009). Solar energy captures the same photons and uses the energy to create a flow of electrons that generate heat (Stier 2009). To enable solar cells to trap energy, the cells are constructed with two layers of semiconductor material, one of which has positively-charged material with a low electron concentration, the other of which has negatively-charged material with a high electron concentration. "The space where these two layers come in close contact is known as the p-n junction. As light heats these sensitive semiconductor layers, a flow of electrons is ignited, resulting in a direct current which ultimately results in electricity" that generates enough energy to power a device or can be used to heat an entire home (Stier 2009). In contrast, in the process of photosynthesis, energy is trapped by the plant's physical…

Pages: 3  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 1


Google Blimp Technologies

However, by using the search engine feature as well there are countless opportunities to find international companies that will ship drugs that are illegal in the United States. There are many of these companies that will appear on a search and even some YouTube videos that will describe the process to import illegal drugs. The U.S. Department of Justice described the process like this (The United States Department of Justice, 2011): The shipment of prescription drugs from pharmacies outside the United States to customers in the United States typically violates the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act and in the case of controlled prescription drugs, the Controlled Substances Act. Google was aware as early as 2003, that generally, it was illegal for pharmacies to ship controlled and non-controlled prescription drugs into the United States from Canada. The importation of prescription drugs to consumers in the United States is almost always unlawful because the FDA cannot ensure the safety and effectiveness of foreign prescription drugs that are not FDA-approved because the drugs may not meet FDA's labeling requirements; may not have been manufactured, stored and distributed under proper conditions; and may not have been dispensed in accordance with a valid prescription. While Canada has its own regulatory rules for prescription drugs, Canadian pharmacies that ship prescription drugs to U.S. residents are not subject to Canadian regulatory authority, and many sell drugs obtained from countries other than Canada which lack adequate pharmacy regulations. Google searches can be a powerful tool to find information. However, this tool can also be used to find information that is against the law. In this case, Google actually sold ads to companies that were knowingly breaking the law. In this case, the courts deemed that Google was negligent and they were forced to pay a fine. However, even though Google is not violating any laws, they can provide the information that is necessary for others to have the opportunity to break the law. This puts an interesting perspective on Google's role in providing the access to information. On one hand, there is a guaranteed right to free speech, however on the other hand Google can provide information to some things that are clearly wrong. Therefore there must be a line drawn somewhere and that line is far from clear. Works Cited Geere, D. (2013, May 26). Google blimps will carry wireless signal across Africa. Retrieved from Wired:…

Pages: 8  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Nuclear Fusion Learning From Failure

Nuclear Fusion: Learning From Failure Wednesday, April 1, 2009. "After more than a decade of work and an investment of $3.5 billion, scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory say they have created a super laser that will enable them to build a miniature sun within the lab in the next two years" (Doyle, 2009). Since the middle of that last century, scientists have attempted to capture the same energy that powers the sun, to produce an energy source that is inexpensive, clean, and limitless. Now, they think they are within two to three years of making the first nuclear fusion ignition which would be the first step in that process. Smash two atoms together; their nuclei join -- or "fuse" -- creating one very heavy atom and energy is released. That's it. In the sun, hydrogen atoms are smashed together by the enormous amount of gravitational pressure, creating a heavy atom of helium and creating "tons" of energy, at a temperature of 10 to 15 million degrees. The pressure needed to do this are about 100 times the pressure felt in the deepest trenches of Earth's oceans. In other words, it would be simple, if we could recreate the temperature and pressure conditions of the sun (Brooks, 2009, pp. 58-59). Scientists have theorized that, by using heavy hydrogen, and deuterium and tritium, available in abundance in sea water, that there is enough energy present in our oceans to meet our requirements. However, after decades of experiments, it has become obvious that reality doesn't necessarily follow theory (Brooks, 2009, p. 59). It has been a long road with many failures, but many successes as well as we discover the practical applications and necessary test conditions to produce pure fusion. In over fifty years of experiments, not one attempt at igniting nuclear fusion has been successful. Probably the most infamous, but not so certain, failure was the 1989 announcement by Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons, chemists at the University of Utah, that they had discovered "cold fusion" -- a simple, inexpensive way to produce nuclear fusion. With "tabletop" equipment, they proudly proclaimed, the mystery had been solved. After millions of research dollars and countless nuclear scientists becoming involved in recreating their spectacular, world-changing discovery, it was determined, in a controversial decision, that cold fusion was impossible (Kahney, 1999). However, the U.S. Navy continued to research the project under the budget anonymity of…

Pages: 4  |  Thesis  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 3


Alternative Fuels for Commercial Aviation

¶ … alternative fuels as well as the presently available fuels and those which are still in the developmental phases. There has been an increase in concern over degradation of the environment over the past two decades and "of the various options open to society to reduce the environmental burden, technology is widely considered as the most attractive option." (Kemp,…

Pages: 9  |  Thesis  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 6


Ecology and Denmark Is a Scandinavian Country

Ecology and Denmark Denmark is a Scandinavian country in northern Europe, the southernmost of the Nordic countries and lies just south of Norway and southwest of Sweden. It is essentially a large peninsula, and borders both the Baltic and North Seas. Politically, it is a constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary government, and is also a large welfare state which underlies…

Pages: 4  |  Essay  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 0


Biodiesel Plant

Biodiesel Plant Marketing & Business Plan Biodiesel is a processed fuel that is produced from biological sources that are biodegradable and produce less C02 than conventional diesel (Woodman, 2007). The biodiesel industry today is well situated to take advantage of the combination of increasing consumer dissatisfaction with American reliance on foreign fossil-fuel energy sources while representing an environmentally responsible alternative…

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 0


Impact of the Higher Gas Prices in the Automobile Industry

¶ … High Gas Prices on the Automobile Industry The heart and soul of this study, the primary research question, purports: What impact(s) do higher gas prices exert on the automobile industry (GM; Ford; Toyota; BMW; other manufacturers)? Subsequent questions include: How has the price of gas progressed through history? What do higher gas prices impact? The study presents pertinent…

Pages: 44  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 20


Government Contracting and the Buy Green Revolution

Government contracting and the "Buy Green" revolution Government Contracting and Green Buying The aim of this paper is to define the term 'Green buying' and link it to the Governmental procurement. Among other important issues, the report describes the reasons why the Central authority must involve in the environmental elements of the national society. In the end, the author shall present its conclusions. The increasing level of pollution and diminishing resources of the natural environment, among which we would like to point out petroleum, gas, coal as the most important ones, drinkable water, had brought the attention of the public on Ecologic issues more than ever. Specialists in the field highlight the fact that the natural resources for the above mentioned elements would last for a limited number of years - let us say 30-50 years. But what happens after that? It is well-known that energetic factors are a very delicate issue- petroleum and natural gas are topics that deploy wars and terror against entire countries. Corporations have made the first step in handling the case by focusing on the finding of new methods to create energy and replace the traditional energetic means. The 'Green power' includes factors like wind, bio-energy, geothermal, solar and hydroelectric energy. However, corporations are not alone in this struggle against the limited resources of Earth; Governments around the world try under different forms to create incentives or even enforce directives for enabling the focus on green products for the end consumer and third companies involved. In the next paragraphs, we shall tackle the Green power topics, briefly describing each element of the category and describe how Governments can induce the ecologic point-of-view in the national economies of states around the globe. Definition of Green Power Green power is the solution to a cleaner, sustainable energy system that would replace the traditional framework, dedicated to a large extent to non-renewable resources having a mineral origin. The fundament of Green Power is the renewable energy -- the power created by sun, wind, plants, and moving water. The characteristics of the new energetic factors relate to sustainability of the natural environment, durable development of the economy, that is not using Earth's limited resources any more, but finds other ways of creating wealth and benefits for the involved individuals. Next we shall present the main elements of the Green power: Wind energy is obtained by the conversion of moving…

Pages: 3  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 5


Economics of Oil

Economics of Oil Today 90% of the world's energy needs come from oil and this is due to the fact that this is the energy source powering most vehicles and it is also the origin of most industrial chemicals. This has become a very important commodity. Getting oil was the reason for many battles including World War II and the…

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Ganges Next Life -- the

Poetic statement Water is meaningless. Water is meaningless, clear, projecting only the face of the gazer into the river. It is clear and tasteless unless human hands for better or for ill adulterate it. This is why water purifies. It is the emptiest of all the elements yet it is the only element that washes us clean, naked -- when we go clothed within the water it weighs us down. Perhaps this is why it is so tempting to ignore the life-sustaining power of water. It seems like something to be taken for granted unless it becomes a nuisance in the form of rain. We see what we want to see in water, or curse it. The throat grows dry, parched. The air becomes still and dry, and our bodies become parched and dry in the absence of the folds and flow of water. We look around at the water, but because of our carelessness, it has become tainted by mud. Once we saw God in the living reflection of water, once we saw our best selves and faces and faith. Now we see nothing, and moan its absence. We scorned water, and sought science, progress, but now beg these things to lead us back to what we left -- pure water. Proposition Poetry is not something that exists outside of nature. By viewing nature in its truth, namely the fact that water has a potentially purifying aspect to it, as well as provides a renewable source of energy, one finds the truest source of poetry. Works Cited Dillard, Annie. "The Wreck of Time: Taking Our Century's Measure." The New Humanities Reader. Edited by Richard E. Miller and Kurt Spellmeyer. New York, 2003. Stille, Alexander. "The Ganges' Next Life." The New Humanities Reader. Edited by Richard E. Miller and Kurt……

Pages: 2  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Environmental Science Nuclear Power Technical Summary to

Environmental Science Nuclear Power Technical Summary To eventually produce electricity with nuclear energy, a mining company must first find, purify, supplement, and make fuel-grade uranium pellets. Uranium is an element that exists in somewhat different forms in nature. All uranium atoms have the same number of protons, but not all uranium atoms have the same number of neutrons. The heat…

Pages: 12  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4


Is Wind Power Green?

¶ … moves in energy prices are showing how the world is at or near peak oil production. This is troubling, as it means that developed and emerging economies must find alternate sources. One possible resource is wind energy. This is a renewable reserve that is using the power of the wind to generate electricity without polluting the atmosphere. However, renewable energy is often seen as expensive and unreliable. As there are variety of organizations and individuals, who have a stake in maintaining fossil fuel-based reserves. To make matters worse, any attempt to move the world away from this source is often seen as anti-competitive. This is because these firms are interested in increasing their bottom results (so that the price of their stock will rise). As a result, these companies and organizations have no interest in promoting renewable resources. In this paper, we will prove that the use of alternative sources can address the world's current and future energy needs. All that is required is the commitment towards making these resources mainstream. This is when the costs will decrease (allowing this source to become more practical). What is Wind Power? Wind power is when a large generator is connected to a turbine. As the wind is blowing its blades will turn, producing electricity. In the last several years, worldwide generating capacity has increased by an average of 25% a year. Moreover, the costs (for this technology) have come down with oil prices remaining at around $80.00 per barrel. This has led to renewed calls for expanding this resource in order to address the world's energy needs. However, there are also many skeptics who believe that this is not efficient and are calling for the development of other sources (such as: natural gas and coal). This has caused some programs to face challenges from these individuals (who are spreading half-truths or outright lies). ("Fossil Fuels and Minerals," n.d., 173 -- 215) Drawbacks of Wind Power There are several drawbacks associated with wind power to include: the costs and the impact that it is having on the landscape. In the case of costs, many opponents will argue that wind does not produce enough electricity to justify the expenses. For example, to power an entire community will requires having acres of wind farms. This will cost tens of millions of dollars and it cannot produce the same kind of results as natural…

Pages: 3  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Centralized Versus Decentralized Energy

¶ … Centralized and Decentralized Power Generation As the date for peak oil looms large in the future, traditional methods of power generation are being reevaluated to determine if they are the optimal approach. Innovations in technology have introduced improved micro-sized wind turbines and more efficient solar photovoltaics and in a growing number of cases, the centralized generation of power…

Pages: 4  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 10


Capturing and Storing Energy: From

"Single small turbines, below 100 kilowatts, are used for homes, telecommunications dishes, or water pumping. Small turbines are sometimes used in connection with diesel generators, batteries, and photovoltaic systems. These systems are called hybrid wind systems and are typically used in remote, off-grid locations, where a connection to the utility grid is not available" (U.S. Department of Energy, 2014). The…

Pages: 8  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Nuclear Power for Energy and Its Impact to the Environment

Nuclear Power for Energy and Its Impact to the Environment Louis Daleandro History of use of nuclear energy Production of nuclear power has a rich history of competing with various other energy-related technological sciences to rule the market. Technology of light water reactor (LWR) finally topped this struggle, which started right after the Second World War. This LWR technology is…

Pages: 10  |  Research Paper  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 10


Mechanical Engineering

¶ … shaping the future of energy production today, including the push for more environmentally friendly alternatives as well as the most cost effective approaches. In this environment, liquefied natural gas has emerged as a viable interim solution to many of the challenges involved in the transition from a fossil-fuel-based global infrastructure to one where a blend of energy-production approaches…

Pages: 23  |  Dissertation  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 70


Hydroelectric Power: The Renewable Energy

S. Department of Energy Hydropower Program, 2001. p. 5). China also has moved on with the newest project of the Three Gorges Dam. The dam would be taking 400 miles for the reservoir only (Ordal, 2002). However this technology sometimes does not work under specific circumstances. Norway, for example, ranked the sixth from the top hydroelectric generating countries in 1998. The country depends much on the hydroelectric stations that provide it economical source of electricity for its people. Once the government realized that they had trouble during the dry year, the electricity cost had increased to 400%. The prolonged dry season had left the dams empty that only limited sources of stored energy left, causing extreme hikes on electricity cost. It might cost 2-3 times higher than usual for the people to keep their houses warm and businesses to stay open. Although reported to be efficient and satisfying, the development of large dams and utilization of powerful turbines have created superfluous effects that have traumatized the adjacent environment. (U.S. Department of Energy Hydropower Program, 2001. p. 7). The main consideration is, such huge construction and landscape alteration required to build a dam will affect the organisms living in the streams and the natural platform of the neighboring areas. Dam construction will at least destroy the farms and villages, forcing the inhabitants to relocate; which costs very high. The other obvious concern is about the threatened fish lifecycle in the river. The powerful movement of the water into the penstock and the turbine rotation has been proven of killing fishes in the rivers. The gravitation force draw fishes into the penstock, and the sharp blades of the turbine instantly bash them into pieces or leave them injured. In North America, the dam operation is reported in endangering young fishes life, as the fishes are sucked into the pipes and smashed onto the wall, while others are killed for increasing water pressure inside the unit (Stoner, 2002. par. 7). Moreover, it is important to consider that the barrier effect of the dam building most likely blockade the natural salmon journey to the spawning site. Some dams have implemented ladder structures for the salmons to make their way through their home, however this method has been reported ineffective. The U.S. Department of Energy recently introduced the new Advanced Turbine Technology to reduce the violent effect of the hydropower plant to the fishes. The…

Pages: 4  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Dod: Pursuing Alternative Energy Conservation

The Navy has indeed been long leading the way in the regard, by engaging in proactive testing of biofuels and demonstrating that there is absolutely no reason that the future of the Department of Defense has to include a dependence on foreign fuels. The Navy was the branch of the DOD which engaged in the testing and certification of 50-50 blends of advanced hydrotreated biofuel and aviation gas as a means of testing, evaluating and demonstrating the wide-range utility and functionality of advanced biofuels in an operational setting. "The military's ability to use fuels other than petroleum reduces vulnerability to rapid and unforeseen changes in the price of oil that can negatively impact readiness, while also increasing energy security….Kaiser delivered 700,000 gallons of hydro-treated renewable diesel fuel, or HRD76, to three ships of the strike group. Kaiser also delivered 200,000 gallons of hydro-treated renewable aviation fuel, or HRJ5, to Nimitz. Both fuels are a 50-50 blend of traditional petroleum-based fuel and biofuel comprised of a mix of waste cooking oil and algae oil." This is quite so promising because it demonstrates the grand potential of biofuels. Biofuels offer up the possibility to offer affordable, renewable sources of energy for the future, without forcing this on-going situation of dependence on foreign fuel sources -- something which has been repeated far too often in the last few decades. The dependence on foreign fuel is akin to a reliance on a backwards and outdated form of technology -- it's as if the military had become dependent on an old-fashioned technology: using foreign fuels is like still being dependent on typewriters or muskrat rifles. Technology is evolving and the DOD has a strong obligation to apply this evolution to the arena of fuels and alternative energy sources. The proof of this viability is in the progress that has already been made: in the beginning the overall objective of the BioFuels program was to develop an affordable alternative production process that will accomplish 60% of conversion efficiency by energy content of crop oil to military aviation fuel and elucidate a path to 90% conversion. With each year, the military comes even closer to meeting that goal in a strong fashion and in a manner which relies on the strengths and abilities of various disciplines: chemistry, engineering, material engineering, biotechnology and propulsion system engineering. Thus, this paper has attempted to demonstrate that the future of energy…

Pages: 4  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4

 1 2 3 . . . Last ›

 

Disclaimer