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Ethics and Morality

Ethics and Morality Organ donation is an extension of a person's life, but who can say whose life should be extended? In a situation where two people are in need of the same organ, who should we choose? Two people are in need of a kidney, one is a two-year-old patient and the other, 47 years old. Who gets to have that kidney that can save their lives? There are a lot of ethical reasons to be considered in choosing the "right" organ recipient. In an article by Dr. David L. Perry, he discussed about ethical considerations in organ transplant. He pointed out some things to be considered in choosing a recipient. First is the ability to pay. Economic inequality may hinder someone from "availing" an organ, but he points out that this shouldn't be that case. Donated organs are not luxuries of life. These are scarce resources and every taxpayer in need has the right to organ transplantation. Another consideration is the preference of the donor or kin. For some this could be an act of kindness or gratitude in which they ask to donate their organ to someone they owe their life to or who they love dearly. But this could also be means of inequality when the donor would only prefer patients of the same race, culture or religion to be their recipients. This could also be true when citizens of the same region and nation are more favored over foreigners. An important consideration is the need for the organ. Who is more in need of the organ? What if two are more patients are equally needy? Between a two-year-old and a forty-seven-year-old, who should get the life-saving kidney? A two-year-old child could have a greater chance to live longer, do more. A 47-year-old has already lived his life, already experienced living; did things……

Pages: 2  |  Term Paper  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 2


Ethics and Morality

Ethics and Morality: Analysis of a Statement The statement: 'It is my duty to speak up if I see someone getting hurt, even if it involves great risk to myself', is one with which I agree, because to speak up on someone else's behalf when he or she is getting hurt by another person or group is to exercise moral virtue, that is, to interfere positively and rationally when someone (or some group) is doing something irrational and therefore negative to someone else. A moral person knows right from wrong, which is a key aspect of moral ethics. Knowing right from wrong, a moral person striving toward virtue (as Aristotle suggests) is able to apply these understandings of right vs. wrong to everyday life. To interfere on someone else's behalf if that other person is getting hurt, either by another person; a group; or perhaps even himself or herself, is a moral virtue. All human beings have the right to be treated rationally and respectfully (people will do this when they possess human virtues, through experience and education. No one should be acted upon negatively due to another individual's irrationality and lack of education leading to an understanding and ability to practice moral virtue. In order for me to be virtuous when I see someone getting hurt, I must act rationally and speak up when another person is being hurt, even at risk to myself. One thing that can and all too often does interfere with acting morally and ethically, if, say, a person is being hurt by another person or group, is that one may fear retribution from the person or group later on, or even fear having the person or group turn against one right then there, and thus become the new target instead of the person first being hurt. One historical example of this sort of dynamic has to do with the way that, during the World War II Holocaust, there were numerous instances during which various European peoples could, if they dared, to speak out against the Nazis and their widespread persecution of Jews……

Pages: 2  |  Term Paper  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 0


Ethics and Moral Theory

Ethics - Moral Theory ETHICS and MORAL THEORY in LIFE IS BEAUTIFUL Life is Beautiful and Dishonesty: The movie Life is Beautiful (1998) portrays the life of Guido Orefice, a Jewish tourist traveling in Italy just before the outbreak of World War II. Under Fascist rule, Italian Jews were rounded up and dispatched to Nazi extermination camps as part of Hitler's "Final Solution" to Europe's "Jewish problem." To keep his five-year-old son Giosue from being frightened by the ordeal, Guido tells him that their purpose for traveling by train to Germany is to compete in a contest to win a shiny new tank because the child greatly admired military vehicles. The film suggests that Guido's deception was justified by its purpose and raises the larger ethical issue of engaging in deception for beneficent rather than selfish reasons. Objective Analysis of the Ethical Issue Presented by the Movie: Different ethical theories offer conflicting views on the morality of lying in order to achieve a worthwhile purpose. For example, utilitarian concepts would support the use of deception exclusively for the benefit of the deceived individual whereas deontological theorists might oppose the violation of the general moral rule prohibiting lying; similarly, the virtue ethics perspective might support the deception if motivated by the underlying motivation that has a moral value. In general, lying is unethical only because deception is much more likely to be motivated by immoral purposes than for beneficent goals. Nevertheless, just as in the case of other ethical principles, the rules intended to preserve those worthwhile principles are not necessarily equipped to address every imaginable situation in which the issues are capable of arising. The interest of public safety requires that the flow of vehicular traffic be regulated by light signals and road signs in conjunction with which enforcement by authorities is appropriate to ensure compliance. However, exceptions from the ordinary circumstances those rules of the road sometimes justify violating those rules. Emergency vehicles may not obey traffic rules for the purpose of achieving the greater purpose of responding to fires and other emergencies and private citizens may also have to violate those established rules to rush someone to the hospital. The fact that exceptions from ordinary situations may justify isolated violations of otherwise sound ethical rules does not undermine the value of those rules; in fact, in certain instances, adhering to formal rules may cause harm instead of preventing…

Pages: 4  |  Essay  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 0


Ethics and Morality in Ethics

So the conclusion is that either accepts the principle that might is right or accepts the fact that by cooperating with others is a better approach to attaining self-interests. Utilitarianism is a modern form of the Hedonistic ethical theory, which promotes that the end of human conduct is happiness, and that the outcome of discriminating between right and wrong is pleasure and pain. Utilitarianism does not associate morality with religion but links determinism with its other tenets, making this ethical theory relatively more positive. Virtue theory places its foundation of morality entirely on the development of good character traits, or virtues. Therefore, a person is good, if he has virtues and has no vices. Virtues include courage, temperance, justice, prudence, fortitude, liberality, and truthfulness. Some virtue theorists believe there are as many as100 virtuous character traits, which make someone a good person. Virtue theory emphasizes on moral education for developing virtuous character traits in youngsters as well as in adults. The inability to develop virtuous character traits results in the person acquiring bad character traits. Vices include cowardice, insensibility, injustice, and vanity. The important issue of contemporary virtue theory is based on whether virtue ethics can be totally unconnected with rules of morality. Eliminatism, is a different view from virtue theory that states rules can be separate from being associated with virtue. This implies that morality is entirely based on virtuous character traits that include one trait such as courage, being completely independent of ideal principles. Religious ethics are the moral principles that serve as a guide to human beings and also set the standard for what is and…

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Ethics and Morality the Ethical Decision Making

Ethics and Morality The ethical decision making framework includes the concepts of ethical issues intensity, organizational factors, individual factors and opportunity. Discuss how these concepts influence the ethical decision making process. Ethical issues intensity is one of the key aspects of how an organization defines its cultural norms, values and beliefs as they relate to how ethics are interpreted and acted upon. The interpretation of opportunities is also defined by the ethical issues intensity of a given organizations' culture as well. In turn organizational factors and individual factors frame or put into context the specific ethical questions an organization confronts over time. The ethical judgment of any opportunity then is more governed by the ethical issues intensity of a given culture first and further clarified by organizational and individualized factors as well. In total, these factors create a cultural baseline of ethics that in turn define the overall framework by which an organization will define itself through its ethical decisions and choices over time. In fact the nature of just what is and is not an opportunity will be interpreted through the use of a given organizations' ethical framework. While there are many different aspects to the development of an ethics framework, the most pervasive is a reliance on utilitarianism that centers on putting the collective good of all in front of the good of just a few. The need for creating an ethics framework to ensure a high level of compliance to ethical standards and values is also crucial. The bottom line is that all these factors contribute to the development of a sustainable and strong ethics framework over time. What are the three levels of ethical concern found……

Pages: 2  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Ethics and Morality: Integrity the

III. Values in Relation to Law Carter (1996) addresses the subject area of law in relation to individual value and principle development in the individual. Salzman (2001) IV. Values in Relation to Religion Salzman addresses this realm of value formation as he tells the story of Sister John, a cloistered nun who has experienced divine visions which are followed by an extremely excruciating headache. It is discovered that this nun in actuality has a brain tumor which is probably causing the visions. Sister John has to make the difficult decision whether to risk herself and continue receiving visions knowing all the while they may be false and as well to do so may even cost her very life. Her 'visitations' with God were influenced by her value and belief system that underwent its' formation under the tutelage of her teacher at the convent. V. The Importance of Integrity and Ethics The importances of integrity and of ethics are clear themes in both the work of Salzman (2001) and Carter (1996). Without the critical factor of integrity throughout this would have been a much duller work and would have carried much less import for the individual's perusal. Integrity is what the individual's word is actually worth and is a measure by which an individual might be judged as to their character. VI. Examples of The Source Material Sister John literally takes upon herself the literal burden borne by Christ as she begins her day and "dropped to her knees on the floor of her cell, and offered the day to God .[praying]: "Let these clothes remind me of my consecration to this life of enclosure, silence, and solitude. It is interesting that the 'mystical' life of Carmel resided in mundane everyday things and indeed within that everyday realm was the discovery of things so special. Salzman writes, "Pure awareness stripped her of everything. She became an ember carried upward by the heat of an invisible flame. Higher and higher she rose, away from all she knew. " Carter states that, "because of the difficulty of trying to raise children with good social values in a nation that talks about values but often can't live up to its aspirations. "Integrity is the crucial element of good citizenship. It's more important to know if someone has integrity than to know whether I agree or disagree with him. If you lack integrity, nothing else…

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Business Ethics and Morality Many

An example of the latter is the continuation of utilizing immigrant and migrant workers to pick harvests in the South west. The illegal immigrants need money, and to employ them picking crops benefits them. If farmers were to pay standard wages for crop harvesting, the price of some foods would skyrocket. Thus the community at large benefits from the presence of migrant workers. However, employing illegal immigrants encourages more laborers to enter our country illegally, creating a number of problems in the Southwest. These workers labor for little more than slave wages, which does not help them build a positive economic future, or break the cycle of poverty. Thus, although utilitarian reasons support the presence of low wage immigrant laborers, the harm caused to this small group does not justify the practice. C3 Kant is one of the philosophers who attempted to take a non-religious perspective on life, and create a universal set of laws which could apply to create an ethical basis for decisions. A Kantian decision would be to limit the treatment to critically ill people in order to spend limited resources on those who show a higher potential for recovery. C4. The nursing profession is more than a doctor's helper. Nurses are trained and desire to provide emotional and non-technical care in order to meet the social, emotional, esteem, as well as the physical needs of their patients. By treating the entire patient, studies show greater recovery rates. However when hospitals have to make decisions of the basis of budgets, such as limiting the care to patients, or limiting the number of staff to adequately meet patient needs, nurse professionals are some of the first to feel the strain, and become discouraged.…

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Ethics and Morality Ethics Dilemmas the Ethical

Ethics and Morality Ethics Dilemmas The ethical considerations here are whether someone's right secure property are more valuable than the risk of your own life. Because the dilemma states that you fear you will freeze to death, I do not see that the cost of your own life would be less valuable than another's claim to secure property. To some it may seem deceitful to the police officers to observe them under these conditions. Yet, it was the police chief's call to tell them the real reason for the observation, or not. The fact that they are acting violently is their choice and you have done nothing wrong in observing it. The farmer is obligated to pay for income he receives and is not entitled to the medical deduction according to law. His action is clearly illegal, so it undermines all other laws to ignore it. However, it does not hurt anyone directly so I would be more likely to do it than other scenarios. Ethically, it seems cruel to the actual test subjects to participate in this project. They may be morally incriminating themselves and may feel bad later when they realize what they would have done in a real situation. 5. The ethical dilemma is whether you can kill your son under duress and the threat of indirectly killing another person. Though it is horrible, your son likely understands the situation to know that you must kill him to save another's life. However, whether or not he understands I would choose to save another life because I feel like I should save as many people as I can in a bad situation. 6. Depending on the law, many psychiatrists have a duty to warn if they think that someone is in actual danger, regardless of confidentiality. If……

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Ethics and Morality Case Analysis Morality Pertains

Ethics and Morality Case Analysis Morality pertains to moral conduct or standards, which in turn, determine the rightness or wrongness of one's conduct (Perle 2004). Ethics is the study of standards of conduct. It is also called moral philosophy. Ethics and morality are often used interchangeably because of their connectedness. It is generally believed that morality is ethics in action.…

Pages: 10  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Ethics and Morality. Provide Specific

The emphasis on filial piety and the need to observe organizational hierarchies within Confucianism arose from a society in which collectivism more than individualism was the predominant value. Ethical systems are often created by a single or several human intelligences, versus the collective creation of a sense of right and wrong that is generated by 'morality.' However, human beings, even philosophers, are inevitably affected by the culture that produced and educated them. Morality is different from religion: "religion differs from morality or a moral system in that it includes stories about events in the past, usually about supernatural beings, that are used to explain or justify the behavior that it prohibits or requires" (Gert 2011). Religion also differs from ethics in the sense that it uses such events to justify the demands of its followers, versus logic, although ethical systems may be generated from religions traditions. Morality likewise is affected by religion, based upon the life experiences of believers and their cultures. However, moral codes are not always explicitly stated, unlike ethical codes. For example, in our society it is generally considered wrong to 'cut' someone in line or to offer an official a bribe. However, in other societies, where corruption and fighting for scarce resources is part of life, these actions may be viewed in a less censorious manner. Even though both societies may have ethical systems that deem such actions wrong, the moral actions of most individuals in the societies are profoundly different. Different moral codes can also coexist in societies. "Many religions condemn homosexual behavior as immoral, but those who hold that morality is primarily concerned with avoiding and preventing harm condemn religious discrimination against homosexuals as immoral" (Gert 2011). Of course, ethical systems can…

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Business Ethics: Personal Moral Intelligence

Integrity I know is "doing what we think is right" (Lennick & Kiel, 2007, 7). The authors say that this quality is the most important and that it is at the foundation of moral intelligence. Responsibility means that a person is willing to answer honestly for their actions; they know what is right (they have integrity) and they do what is right (Lennick & Kiel, 2007, 7). Maybe the most important ones for me, personally, to pay attention to are compassion and forgiveness. I have a difficult time forgiving myself for problems that I cause others. Since "compassion and forgiveness operate on two levels: first how we relate to ourselves and second, in how we relate to others" (Lennick & Kiel, 2007, 8), I first need to learn how to forgive myself for the mistakes I make. If I cannot forgive myself then how am I going to learn to forgive, and be compassionate with, others? Discovering what these four traits mean to me is the most important part of writing a personal ethical code. The first question I answer is why I need to be moral in the first place. I believe that being a moral person, someone who the four qualities outlined in the text, will allow me to be a more successful person. I define success not as a monetary standard, but as a person who can go to sleep at night and rest peacefully. If I deal with myself and others with integrity, responsibility, compassion and forgiveness every day, then I will be successful. Next I need to determine what my principles, values and beliefs are. From the MCI, I believe that integrity is the principle that I value most. I also find that I value telling the truth more than any other trait. The final part of the statement has to do with beliefs. Beliefs are a condensed statement of principles and values (Lennick & Kiel, 2007, 49). My personal statement is that I will act with integrity and truth in all dealings with myself and other people. Discovering my purpose has been a difficult pursuit. After reading the book, I think that discovering that may actually be easier than I thought. Oprah Winfrey said that purpose was like a finger print (Lennick & Kiel, 2007, 54), meaning that it is unique to every person. I believe that my purpose involves helping people perhaps in…

Pages: 6  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4


Ethics, Morality, & Medicine in

Thus, it is almost impossible today to define a common set of medical moral principles to which all physicians subscribe." (Pellegrino, 2006,-Page 66) There is no consensus of the moral and ethical codes of practicing medicine. This is alarming. Morals and ethics belong in the practice of medicine. Pellegrino continues and provides historical precedence for the necessity of ethics and morals with respect to practicing physicians: "In a rather brief disquisition on medications, Scribonius put forward the notion that we should determine the responsibilities of the physician by examining the nature of medicine itself. He said that the aim of the physician, the end of medicine, was humanitas. That was the first time, as far as we know, that a word with that precise meaning was used in this connection. Humanitas -- humanity, a love of mankind, was not the same as philanthropia, the Greek concept which expressed rather a kindliness towards the patient that would enable the physician to have a good practice and a good reputation." (Pellegrino, 2006,-Page 66) One can only take a moment to imagine the experience of a physician as well as the quantity and quality of ethical and moral choices and/or situations one would encounter as a basic function of the job description. It is stunning to consider the physicians travelling around various hallways around the western world practicing medicine and treating swarms of patience and lacking or disagreeing upon the system of morals and ethics within the workplace and profession. How many people would continue to seek treatment at hospitals if they considered those questions? How many people would put their faith in physicians and hospitals after reading about Anna's experience? Ultimately, the books teaches that though Anna had the "right" or appropriate set of ethics and morals, she was meant to die so that Kate could live because Kate is the child her parents actually wanted. Out of all the characters in the story, the character of Kate might be the most challenging. She did not ask to be born; she certainly did not ask to have leukemia. She neither asked her parents to conceive and raise another child so as to harvest that child's body parts to keep her alive. Kate wants to live. Most people do. She also respects her sister's rights to have her own life. She additionally appreciates, while perhaps does not fully understand, why her parents made…

Pages: 6  |  "Discussion and Results" Chapter  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 3


Ethics and Moral Development in

S. Mill, presents an altogether different perspective of Janice's dilemma. Since Utilitarianism considers the ethical value of an action or behavior based on its outcome, that is, there is an achievement of greatest happiness for most (or majority) of people. In this theory, collective happiness and satisfaction is considered, and not the individual's benefit only. Thus, since the second situation presented, wherein Janice connives with John to present his program as her own in exchange for a raise in salary and promotion, creates happiness for both Janice and John, then this is the action that Janice must adopt. In effect, using the utilitarian perspective, the ethical thing to do when put in Janice's position is to offer John a raise and promotion in order to benefit from his essential input, the program he created, which she will be using as her "own" work/creation. The theory of rights-based decision-making takes into account morality, which looks into the adherence/non-adherence of an individual to standard rules of conduct. In this theory, morality comes into play, wherein the individual or decision-maker makes the decision on a situation based on his/her rights to do so. However, in using his/her rights, the individual must also make sure that s/he does not affect or intrude with other people or another individual's rights. In Janice's case, she should not coerce John into cooperating with her 'plan,' on the threat that she would lower his performance evaluations. Option 2, then, is more appealing, wherein Janice and John cooperates with each other, benefiting both of them, as John lets Janice use his program, and Janice, raise John's salary and give him promotion. The theory of justice-based decision-making considers an action/behavior as moral or immoral based the equality or impartiality of the decision made by the individual vis-a-vis other people's welfare. Under this theory, an individual must base the soundness and morality of his/her decision according to the fairness of the decision / resolution made. In this case, Janice should not coerce John into conniving with her plan; similarly, John should not cooperate with Janice's plan in exchange for a raise in salary and promotion. What should be considered is Janice's boss and the people who will benefit on the program: giving them the proper information on the true author and origin of the program, giving John due credit, and Janice owning up the responsibility of not accomplishing her assigned task…

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Ethics in the Workplace Organizational

However, they would also be at risk of getting laid off unless they bring in some business to the hotel. The management of the hotel could face a cut in its salaries if the request is rejected and business continues to suffer. If the request is accepted, they would benefit from the increased revenue and raised profile of the hotel.…

Pages: 8  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 8


Morality and Ethnics of Frankenstein's Daemon and Shakespeare's Richard III

Ethics & Morality in Frankenstein & Richard III Ethics and Morality in Frankenstein and Richard III Literature has provided mankind with entertainment for centuries. Through literature, authors were able to express their thoughts. What Frankenstein and Richard III convey about morality and ethics? According to a presentation about Ethical Decision-Making in the California State University, Northridge website, "ethics is a conscious stepping back and reflecting on morality." On the other hand, morality is defined as behaviors and beliefs about human decency, right and wrong, good and evil, proper and improper. An analogy with music and musicology helps explain the difference between the definition of ethics and morality. Morality is said to be comparable to music and ethics is comparable to musicology. According to the California State University, musicology is "a conscious reflection on music"; following the analogy, ethics is therefore a conscious reflection of morality. In order to analyze how ethics and morality is embodied in Frankenstein and Richard III, a recollection of both stories is necessary. Frankenstein, written by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, is a story about the life of Dr. Victor Frankenstein who is an intelligent young man. The quest for scientific knowledge was Victor Frankenstein's obsession. He was particularly fixated with the mystery of giving life. Working hard in his laboratory alone, he spent all his time in isolation in creating a being out of the organs of dead men. Not realizing the full extent of the consequences of his experiment, Victor Frankenstein created a monstrous being. Victor Frankenstein ended up abandoning the monstrous being he created because he was so appalled by his creation's repulsive appearance. The daemon that Frankenstein created was gentle and sensitive at the beginning. Just like any child, it was curious about everything there is in the world. It yearned to be loved. However, all of these initial characteristics changed largely because of its isolation. Having experienced only cruel encounters with humans, Frankenstein's daemon became bitter and revengeful. And because of its hideous appearance which all human feared, the monster was forced to hide itself, away from people. Frankenstein's daemon yearned most for nothing else but to feel that it belongs to a group or to someone. However, its hideous appearance prevented Frankenstein's daemon to establish any meaningful connection with another human being. This drove the monster to become vengeful to its creator. It ended up killing the people who are most dear…

Pages: 5  |  Thesis  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 3


Code of Ethics in the Department of Justice

Code of Ethics as Applicable to the Department of Justice The topic of ethics from the aspect of a professional and scientific viewpoint has emerged as a topic of significant concern in recent years, both for the Department of Justice and for other organizations as well. Ethics is generally a term used to describe a set of values that describe…

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Ethics and Decision Making Values

In short, even if I disagree with the decision personally, I feel that I can justify and account for my decision. This is again linked with my level of moral development, where I make decisions based on wanting to live up to the expectations of others. In this case, it is not about being accepted by others, but more about not being rejected by others. I feel that I am justified by referring to the morality of the actual organization and that this prevents personal rejection. This links particularly to cultural values, since I think it is considered important to show loyalty to the organization that pays you. It has now been seen that the process of making decisions is impacted by personal values, organizational values, and cultural values. In any given situation, all of these value systems will often be playing a role. The difference is which one takes precedence in the specific situation. As also noted, this is also closely linked with the need to act based on meeting the expectations of others, which is a major motivation factor in many cases. This includes meeting the expectations of individuals within the organization as well as meeting the larger social expectations. However, in some cases, personal values will override the need for acceptance and will be the prime motivation factor. References Graham, J.W. (1995). Leadership, moral development and citizenship behavior. Business Ethics Quarterly, 5(1), 43-54. Janis, I.L. (2000). Groupthink. In J. Billsberry (Ed.), The effective manager: Perspectives and illustrations (pp. 166-178). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. Jansen, E., & Von Gilnow, M.A. (1985). Ethical ambivalence and organizational reward systems. Academy of Management Review, 10, 814-822. Woodman, R., & Pasmore, W. (1990). Research and……

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Ethics Case Study

Ethics and Behavior Ethics and morality The discussion between the ethical can the moral has been going on for a long time and the philosophers tend to agree that these two terms most of the time are use interchangeably and at times may have a thin line between these two terms. There are issues that can be considered moral yet are unethical, and there are acts that also be considered ethical yet they are immoral. Morality is widely considered as the code of conduct that that is accepted by a given society and for those who can understand it, there is no universal standards to it. On the other hand, ethics are more general and have the aspect of general laws that guide them (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2002). This paper hence makes the difference between these two terms by the use of a case study derived from a real happening within the U.S.A. The classic example that can be used to discuss the two terms is the well know issue of corrections officers pregnant by inmate Tavon White. According to Fuchs E., (2013) of National Post, the inmate manipulated several vulnerable female guards into not only being accomplices to his criminal acts behind bars but also to sleep with him and gave birth to five children with the four female guards. The manipulation of these guards into submission resulted in perpetuation of the very same crimes that the guards are supposed to be fighting and also the casting of doubt over the work ethics of the guards that were involved in this criminality and breach of work ethics either directly or indirectly. The fact that by so compromising their working conditions and guidelines and perpetuating drug trafficking and even some of the officers being beneficiaries to the fruits of these illegal acts in the prison gang, there are obviously significant ethical and moral issues that arise from the entire act. The cultural issues that arise from this case is the intentional targeting of the female guards and manipulating them with the intention of having them agree and do what the criminals want. This was both unethical in that the female guards were made to break the law but also immoral since they intentionally targeted the female gender hence gender-based discrimination. The other cultural aspect that was involved here was the race issue since the inmate involved was a black…

Pages: 3  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Ethical Integrity

Ethics and Morality: Ethics is basically about what we do and not about what we say or what we intend to do. Ethics is the core of integrity which is demonstrating steadiness between the ethical principles and ethical practices. On the other hand, integrity is the essential measure of character ("How do I Maintain," n.d.). It's important to note that…

Pages: 8  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 7


Business Dining Mechanics of Table Manners and Restaurant Etiquette

Ethics and Morality The Art and Etiquette of Business Dining Dining etiquette and table manners are thought to be more significant to a person's career triumph then one thinks. Proper table manners are connected with professionalism. Bad table manners are related to a lack of professionalism. On any given day, a business professional might have to know how to seat…

Pages: 8  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


What's Wrong With This Picture

Ethics & Morality Decision Criteria In order to determine the best way to deal with this situation, some decision criteria must be set. The first criterion is the alternative's value to the organization. As a consultant, you have been hired to perform a task. The most important driver in any decision within that task is the impact of that decision on the value of the outcome of the task. In this instance, the value of the outcome has been severely compromised. The best outcome is likely not an option, so the alternative should have the objective of finding the best outcome given the constraints. The second criterion to evaluate is the alternative's value to you as a business. As a consultant, your reputation is important so the decision should be evaluated against any potential impacts to your reputation. Your track record of success is a key driver for future business, so this should also be taken into consideration. Work that is below your standards will ultimately reflect on you as much if not more than on the client, so the decision should be weighed against your ability to maintain your professional standards. The third criterion should be your personal ethics. Regardless of the standard of work you are able to submit, your work should ideally not violate your personal ethical code. As a person, you do need to be able to sleep at night, no matter how much money the job pays. Moreover, it can be a detriment to your business if you are seen by potential customers as putting money ahead of ethics, especially if your job involves writing a code of ethical conduct. It is critical that you maintain the ethical high ground. If the company is curtailing your ability because it lacks strong ethical standards, that will come out sooner or later, and your name will be attached to that company and its lack of ethics. Defense of your own personal ethics must be taken into consideration. Alternatives One alternative is to continue with the project under the constraints without question. This means working around the constraints to put the best code of conduct and mission statement together for the company as possible. While it is understood that the quality of the code will be compromised by the actions of Green's legal department, you were hired to do a job and you should do it to the…

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How to Be Good

Ethics & Morality - Being Good HOW to BE GOOD Nick Hornby's book How to Be Good might be better titled Goodness Can't Be Forced. The overall tone of the book is miserable, or rather, two people going through the motions of being better than they really are. By nature, both David and Katie come across as miserable with themselves, miserable with each other, and miserable in general. David is annoyed by other people for the silliest reasons, and sometimes, for what seems like nothing at all. At some point, he decides to write about what it takes to be good, which seems almost as natural as Paris Hilton writing about being an intellectual. In truth, David is impatient, judgmental, and annoyed arbitrarily by things that are really none of his business and nothing that merits legitimate criticism or complaint. The irony is that one of the fundamental principles of goodness is examining one's opinions and attitudes about other people to ensure that one's opinions are based on objective principle rather than subjective opinion or personal idiosyncrasies that are unjustifiable. That means not criticizing others based only on our own personal likes and dislikes. Even more importantly, goodness means applying the same rules for one's self as one expects others to uphold, rather than a double standard. A typical example would be the attitude that many people seem to have about double parking and yielding the right of way on the road. Many of us react with anger when we find that someone has double parked next to our car blocking us in. We blare our horn in anger and then berate the offender when he returns to his car for his inconsideration. But on other occasions, we find ourselves doing the exact same thing to others when we need to run into a store and no parking spots are available nearby, reasoning that we will only be a minute or two. The point is that anger in the first situation may very well be appropriate, but then our own behavior must be consistent with when we find ourselves in the reciprocal position. A good person, therefore, does not do what he considers wrong when others do it; a good person holds himself to the same standards that he expects others to uphold. If we religiously yield the right of way to approaching vehicles when they are to the right…

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Ethics and Morality in Basic

Similarly, if we injure others seriously, we could be committed to jail. Hence it would be in our best interests not to harm other people. Further, if we habitually lie to others, it will be impossible for them to trust us. In such a case, telling the truth would be in our best interests. Yet another example that can be cited in this case regards entering into arrangements that are mutually beneficial and ensuring that we keep our promises. In this case, it can be noted that to benefit, individuals sometimes have to rely on others. It is impossible to benefit from others if the individuals we seek to benefit from fail to keep their promises. However, we cannot expect others to keep their promises if we on our part do not keep ours. In the final analysis and from the self-interest point-of-view, the relevance of keeping promises cannot be overstated. Hence from this perspective, we should at all times do unto others what we would ordinarily expect them to do unto us. Dissenting Views/Arguments It is important to note that though the above arguments are relatively convincing when it comes to presenting ethical egoism as a well-founded morality theory, there exists some objections regarding the same. To begin with, ethical egoism seems to advocate for a clear distinction between two groups of people, that is, the rest of the populace and ourselves. In so doing, the theory prescribes the preferential treatment of the second group i.e. ourselves as opposed to the first group i.e. The rest of the populace. However, the question that ought to be asked in this case is; what makes the second category of individuals more important than the first category? Why should the second category be given preferential treatment? When looked at from a critical point-of-view, these questions in one way or the other present ethical egoism as a doctrine that is rather arbitrary. These questions can however be answered by reverting to an earlier argument I presented earlier on. According to that argument, it is an individual who in perfectly aware of his or her needs and wants. This awareness makes the needs of such an individual (and hence the individual) more important than those of others which he or she is only imperfectly aware of. Next, although ethical egoism does not expressly call for agents to harm others as they seek to maximize…

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Philosophy of Pleasure the Question

For even if the deed is out of place, the pleasure at any rate is worth choosing for its own sake and good" (45). Individual enjoyment is the only thing that matters, even if it means that the action defies the ethical or moral distinctions of the society. In his writing On Moral Ends, Cicero too discusses the question of pain and pleasure and the importance that this plays in everyday life. He writes: "Some, then, consider that our basic desire is for pleasure and our basic aversion is to pain. Others hold that it is freedom from pain that we are first drawn to, and pain that we first shun" (123). Here he discusses two different perspectives on the same topic. For some people, they choose to perform ethical or moral behaviors in order to enjoy life and to avoid pain. The other type of person is more considered with simply avoiding pain and is less concerned with achieving pleasure. Each of these three men has a distinct impression of what the most important aspect of life entails: either pain or pleasure. Cicero and Bentham both believed that the pleasure of the masses was the most important thing. They felt that ethical and moral distinctions were defined by what would be most pleasurable, and thus best, for the largest population. Contrary to this perspective was Epicurus who believed that people should endeavor to do in this world what would make them happiest, that gives them to most pleasure even if that meant that other people would have to suffer and be unhappy. Works Cited: Bentham, Jeremy. An Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation, Volume 1. 1789. Print. Carneade. Cicero de Finibus. 5. Print. 15-17. Cicero. On Moral Ends. Ed. Julia Annas. Cambridge.……

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Morality and Ethics in Henry

He is of the view that in English society, if a man refused the sexual advances of a woman, his masculinity was often doubted, whereas if a woman chose to have a lover, she was shunned and considered immoral. At one occasion in the novel, Lady Booby is vexed at Andrews' almost fatuous resistance and angrily lashes out at him,…

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Fear Morality Fear and Morality

Because of these thoughts, it is apparent that he did not believe that morality, as people know it, could come without there be some fear attached. People may not believe that they acted out of fear from some dire consequence, but they actually did. This can be seen in the fact that people who do bad things, go to jail. Thus, even on the physical plane it is fearful to go to jail so one ought to do good. This is in concert with the idea that God is in control of fear and uses it to create His version of goodness. Fear without Morality and Morality without Fear However, by approaching this as if it were a mathematical proof, it can be proven that his point is wrong. There are examples of people experiencing fear without morality and morality without fear. Two cases are presented to demonstrate this truth. A study was conducted by psychologists in which three-year-old children in Mauritius were "exposed to two different types of sounds" and then their sweat response was measured (Cline). The gist was that one sound was followed by a blaring horn and the other was not. The children learned to anticipate the horn and sweated, a known fear response, when they knew it was coming. The original experiment was conducted in the 1970's. The report says that "decades later the team looked to see if any of the original children had significant criminal records" (Cline). It was found that 138 did, and they were children who had a much less sweat response than the other children. Thus, it can be concluded that this response was inherent and not learned due to the age of the children (Cline). So the fear creates morality argument is debunked. Taking it the opposite direction, morality can also exist in the absence of fear. According to one researcher, Pillay, there are fear-response moral clauses such as "don't murder" and "don't steal" (Pillay), but there are also those that people, sometimes, adhere to such as "do unto others as you would have them do unto you." This is not based in fear, but it is based in a desire to truly have a good outcome. The problem, he says, is not that morality can only happen through a fear response, but that it happens much more often because of fear than without it that is the problem…

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Moral Theory and Virtue Ethics

However, the desire to do the act must be exhibited through a moral virtue habit. Therefore, moral virtue is different from intellectual virtue, because the desire differs from the reason. Thus, just as the desire is a human action principle as far as reason is concerned, moral habits must be considered virtues as they conform to reason. Traits that have been thought to be virtues Courage Liberality Friendly Honesty Kindness Reliable Considerate What traits do you find most important in your personal relationships? A positive attitude is directly linked to a better personal relationship, greater success, and superior health. A positive attitude can boost my energy, inspire relationships, increase my inner strength, and generate the fortitude needed to counter challenges. In most cases, positive thinking heightens one's lifespan, reduce distress levels, reduce depression, and give me greater resistance to common colds, offer physical well-being, and better psychological health. All these will allow me cope well in times of stress and hardships in my personal relationships. A positive attitude can lead to a good interpersonal relationship both at the professional and personal levels. Negative attitudes could result in the lack of trust in a relationship. This trait is mostly established via parental training or from peer groups (Vaughn, 2013). One's attitude towards other people can help to establish whether the individual will be a failure or a success in relationships. People prefer dealing with individuals who are honest and can be trusted. They also want partners who are responsible and reliable. Personal relationships work best when both partners are kind, trustworthy, and considerate. Besides, if a person acts in an obnoxious manner towards other, he/she might end up without any friends. References MacKinnon, B. (2012). Ethics: Theory and contemporary issues, concise edition. Belmont, Calif: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning Vaughn, L. (2013). Contemporary moral arguments: Readings in ethical issues. New York:……

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Virtue Ethics

Virtue Ethics Over the centuries philosophers have argued about the most ethical ways that humankind should interact with the world around them. Where, number of different theories have emerged to help guide everyone as to the most appropriate way to act within a society. In some cases, these theories have often been reliant on rules to set the most appropriate…

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Business Ethics Every Individual Is Constantly Presented

Business Ethics Every individual is constantly presented with both moral and ethical issues in society and the workplace. This paper will address the difference between ethical and moral issues as well as the applications of each in the workplace. In determining the proper course of action, each individual must access and apply both his personal ideals and the rules of the societal system in which he lives. These two systems used to determine appropriate action illuminate the subtle difference between morals and ethics. Morals are a personal code of right and wrong that defines one's character, while ethics point to standards of behavior expected by the societal group to which the individual belongs (Desnoyer, 2010). This difference can create conflict because a person's moral code is often unchanging (having been developed though the course of the his lifetime), while the ethics he practices are dependant on the applicable group to which he belongs (national, familial, business, scholastic etc.) and such points are likely to exist where these two systems diverge. Such conflicts between personal morals and societal ethics can at times lead to positive change. For example, consider slavery. Until the late 1800's it was socially acceptable and nationally ethical to own slaves in America. However, as a growing number of individual's personal morals recognized the harm that such accepted slavery caused to may people, the anti-slavery movement gained strength and the eventual result was that slavery was no longer considered ethical and became outlawed by the 13th Amendment to the U.S., constitution. However, a discussion of slavery requires a more detailed description of individual differences in personal moral philosophies. Forsynth gives insight to help one understand more clearly how some individuals did not find slavery morally reprehensible, while others were so revolted by the concept that a civil war was eventually fought to determine whether slavery would continue to be a socially acceptable action. According to Forsynth (Forsyth, 1980) such differences are due to the concepts of idealism and relativism. Idealism, describes the degree to which an acting individual is affected by the consequences of his action on the welfare of others. High idealistic individuals believe that it is always unnecessary or wrong to harm others, and that moral actions should and do lead to good or positive consequences. A low idealistic individual believes that harmful consequences may sometimes be necessary to produce a greater good (Forsyth, 1980; Forsyth,…

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Morals and Ethics What Makes Actions Right and Wrong

¶ … Ethics Ethical decision-making paradigms are often presented as a contrast between situational ethics, or individuals who make ethical decisions on a case-by-case basis, and ethics based upon sweeping moral systems (Hursthouse 2007). In general, I favor the latter schema, but I also see value in the former. I think that overall is too easy to rationalize bad behavior based upon situational needs. That is why I stated that 'it is always wrong to kill innocents during wartime,' even though I fully acknowledge that even in just wars, innocents are killed. If everyone upheld the higher moral standard of not killing innocent non-combatants, there would perhaps be no wars, or at least less costly wars. Setting ethical standards, in my view, should be about setting ethical ideals, even though we live in an imperfect world, and can never uphold any ethical system in its entirety. It is all too easy to shrug one's shoulders and say that it is impossible to live an ethically pure life regarding other people, the environment, and even in terms of the standards we set for our individual self-improvement. Without high goals, change is impossible. That is why I believe it is important to have some kinds of general moral rules, even if they are not able to be obeyed at all times in the 'real world.' Instead of thinking up exceptions, we must do all we can to make these rules 'work.' I am not inflexible -- far from it. I think self-defense is morally permissible when physically attacked, and to steal when starving is acceptable, even though under most circumstances I believe violence and stealing is wrong. However, that is because I uphold the principle……

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Defend the Ethics of Your Values by

Defend the Ethics of Your Values by Using One or More of the Four Kinds of Ethical Theories Personal values development Although it may sound strange, given that religious values have not formed the core of my moral development, the ethical theory with which I most identify is that of Kantian deontological or duty-based ethical theory. I believe that certain moral values are absolute, and cannot be distilled with situational variables. These moral values include tolerance, respect for other human beings, and the need to make meaning out of one's existence beyond merely serving one's material desires and needs. While some aspects of various ethical systems may vary between cultures, for a human being or a society to be ethically functional, there must be some core of moral values to support its rules and tenants. This is why, over the course of my moral development, I have defined my moral identity as a search for absolute truths. My beliefs in the value of anti-materialism, tolerance of gays and lesbians, and other issues have changed over time, but they changed and grew more sound and certain as I created a more coherent ethical code for myself. One of the reasons I am less sympathetic to utilitarianism or consequential ethics than other philosophical theories is because utilitarianism stresses satisfying the needs of the greatest number of individuals, in a material sense. While this may sound democratic in theory, the question always arises -- what majority, of what group of people? The majority of one's own group or one's own nation or all humanity? For example, the individuals who orchestrated some of the deals that gave rise to the current credit crisis might have rationalized that their actions served a common good, because they served the majority of their shareholders, families, and colleagues. Yet the majority needs of all of society were not upheld, and many innocent individuals were hurt because of the subsequent recession that occurred. It is not in human nature to fairly perceive 'the majority' as the whole of humanity -- we pick and choose what majority we satisfy, when we are engaged in utilitarian thinking. Kant would respond to these utilitarian bankers that to take risks with other people's money and to encourage financially ignorant individuals to take out mortgages was a violation of the principles of trust and ethics that must underlie every professional transaction. I agree with…

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Individual Project - Ethics Individual Project the

Individual Project - Ethics Ethics Individual Project The Hon. Justice Potter Stewart once wrote: "There is a big difference between what we have the right to do and what is right." While this may seem immoral to some people, the reality is that American law protects individual liberties first and foremost, which can make it more difficult to legislate ethical…

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Ethics of Care Serve as a Clever

Ethics of care serve as a clever alternative to the familiar moral theories that serve so poorly to guide an individual lives. The ethics of care is merely a few decades old, yet it is by now a distinctive moral theory or normative approach to the troubles humans face. It is important to global along with political matters as well as to the individual relations that can most clearly represent care (Virginia Held, 2007). However, the modern literature illustrate that ethics of care can be used as a theoretical basis to add a new, significant surface to social matters. The ethics of care is related to ethical theory to be exact a theory regarding what make an individual actions right as well as wrong. Plus it is one of a group of normative ethical theories that were originated by feminists in the mid of the twentieth century. Despite the fact that consequentialist as well as deontological ethical theories highlight universal values and independence where as ethics of care highlight the significance of relationships. In addition, it should be noted that the ethics of care was originally inspired and motivated by the efforts of psychologist Carol Gilligan who worked with psychologist Lawrence Kohlberg at the same time as he was doing research on his theory of moral development however Gilligan's efforts on women's moral development began in reaction to the apparent male based outcomes that arise from Kohlberg's learning some how Gilligan as well as others have recommended that the history of ethics in Western culture has highlighted the justice vision of morality for the reason that it is the point-of-view that has traditionally and conventionally been sophisticated as well as cultivated plus shared by males where as by marked different females have traditionally and usually been taught a unusual kind of moral outlook that highlights unity, building a community also caring about one's out of the ordinary relationships. So, the care view of morality has been disregarded, ignored, neglected and trivialized for the reason that women were traditionally at point of limited power as well as authority. In fact, justice view of morality emphasizes on doing the precise thing although if it need personal cost or forfeiting the interest of those to whom an individual is close moreover care view would instead indicate that an individual can and must place the interests of individuals who are close to us greater…

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Vamc Ethics the Lincolnville Vamc

The strict code of conduct and the well-understood hierarchy that exists at al levels of the military makes it quite easy to remain within ethical guidelines both as medical professionals and as members of the military, and deviance in such behavior is not looked upon lightly, holding individuals strongly to this applied code of ethics. Another ethical leg-up that the VA system as a whole and the Lincolnville VAMC in particular is in the recent technological growth and expansion that has radically changed the way certain processes are carried out within the system and its individual institutions (Kizer et al. 2009). With better integrated information networks and a variety of treatment- and administrative-related equipment and software, care within the VA system has been made far more efficient and effective, as well as presenting a cost savings to all paying parties (Kizer & Dudley 2009). There are certainly some ethical issues that the Lincolnville VAMC needs to address, and indeed that the entire VA system must examine. The institution and the wider system have also greatly improved in some areas, and appears to be performing fairly strongly from an ethical viewpoint. Addressing the problems the institution has will lead to more effective and accessible care. References Howlader, N., Ries, L. & Edwards, B. (2009). The Impact of Underreported Veterans Affairs Data on National Cancer Statistics: Analysis Using Population-Based SEER Registries. Journal of the National Cancer Institute 101(7): 533-6. Hunter, L. & Schmidt, N. (2010). Anxiety psychopathology in African-American adults: Literature review and development of an empirically informed sociocultural model. Psychological Bulletin 136(2): 211-35. Kizer, K. & Dudley, A. (2009). Extreme Makeover: Transformation of the Veterans Health Care System. Annual Review of Public Health. Layman, E. (2008). Ethical Issues and the Electronic Health Record. Health Care Manager 27(2):165-76. Upahyay, S., Beck, A. & Rishi,……

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Ethics Is a Moral Philosophy That Attempts

Ethics is a moral philosophy that attempts to discover a systematic understanding of the nature of morality and what it requires of people -- which, in Socrates's words, would simply come down to "how we ought to live" -- and why (Rachels & Rachels 2009). But, who is to say how one ought to live? Every person or group has…

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Ethics, Morality, Values, and Beliefs

Morally, defense lawyers may feel a sense of repugnance on an emotional level, based on their childhood teachings, when representing guilty clients. But legal, ethical systems of professional conduct are constructed and articulated as absolutes, particularly for a profession may conflict with morality. Likewise, a businessperson who is a CEO has vowed to make a profit for the company -- it is unethical for him to better his once-humble family's home life with largess while stealing funds even from wealthy stockholders. Beliefs, in contrast to ethics or morality do not have good/bad implications. I can believe in God, or believe in Darwinism, but that does not mean I believe God is good or evolution is good, merely that I believe they exist, based on my intellectual orientation. I may value the pursuit of education and having a family as one of my core values, or value upholding the virtues of being a good child and a good friend, but values are rather vague in terms of priority, for they do not instruct that one must do one or the other action -- ethically I am bound as someone with insider information about a stock not to reveal that information, even if I value someone's friend friendship, because I value my commitment to my professional code more than simple friendship. In terms of my own development of ethics, probably the first ethical education any child receives comes when he or she is first tempted to swipe a piece of candy from a store. Unlike the moral commandment to 'be nice to your sister,' or else she will cry, or the value of friendship not to 'snitch' in class when your best friend doesn't have his homework, eventually one learns that one has an ethical obligation not to steal. This is true even if the store owner thinks it is cute to see a little person act like a thief and you suffers no consequences for the action, after your mother forces you to take the candy back. In other words, ethics is about right and wrong, rather than what might happen to you if you do a bad thing, and even if you gave the candy bar to your best friend and upheld the value of friendship and fellowship, it would still stand as an ethical wrong. Beyond the family and school, however, ethics is often situation-specific in professional life. This…

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Virtue Ethics Virtue-Based vs. Duty-Based

" One of the reflections given in this short story is that the quest towards morality is never-ending. Perhaps what Hawthorne wanted to extend to his readers is that, despite the evident morality that emerged from a duty-based ethic, this does not mean that one is absolutely moral. As with the other individuals who had been given the privilege and honor of resembling the Great Stone Face, Ernest and these people are just representations of the multiple facets of morality. Thus, Ernest represents duty-based ethic, and the statement "still hoping that some wiser and better man than himself would by and by appear" suggests that there is another facet of morality that humanity has yet to ponder and determine. Thus, morality is an infinite concept devoid of any absolute definition or meaning. Victor Hugo in "Les Miserables" had also expressed agreement over the claim that morality is a never-ending conquest for humanity. However, he has shown a stronger position of believing in duty-based ethic than Hawthorne. In his novel, Hugo represents through the character of Bishop Bienvenu the embodiment of an individual who has not expressed belief in moral and ethical principles, yet manifests these beliefs through his good works. Bienvenu is best portrayed through Mdlle. Baptistine, who described the Bishop's character as "something truly evangelical in this delicacy which abstains from sermonizing, moralizing and making allusions ... " From these reflections, it became apparent that one need not have known moral and ethical principles, and that by doing moral and ethical acts does one only and truly achieve morality. In effect, Hugo's belief in duty-based ethic is sufficiently exemplified in Bienvenu's character. From the analyses of Mayo, Hawthorne, and Hugo's works, it is shown that morality is, at best, a real concept that can only be recognized and determined if one sees it. Unlike virtue-based ethics, one need not go into details, enumerating his/her moral and ethical beliefs for people to believe that he or she is moral; rather, doing good works are proof already of one's morality. Aristotle and Frankena, meanwhile, offers a "middle ground" in understanding morality. Rather than arguing that there is indeed a difference between virtue- and duty-based ethics, or choosing one over the other, they instead asserted that both virtue- and duty-based ethics complement each other. That is, one cannot exist without the other. This position is elucidated further in their philosophical works. In…

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Ethics According to the Dictionary

However, as an adult, individuals are free to leave behind the ethics of their parents to create a unique set of ethics. The development of ethics later in life can be based on personal experience and wisdom as much as from standardized codes of behavior. In the business world, ethics develop as a diversity of individuals tries to work together towards a common goal. Ethical business standards are based on several factors, including profitability. Many experts believe that ethical businesses are successful businesses because companies want to do business with companies with high moral standards. If a company is known to have unethical standards, clients will drop off in droves. No one wants to get cheated out of money or humiliated. Thus, ethics develop over time, in response to business environments, to the demands of the consumer and to the demands of the market. A diverse workforce also influences the development of ethics, as the wider the range of voices in an organization, the more complex and multifaceted its ethical code will be. Ethics are one of the primary factors influencing personal and professional decision making. From pricing to hiring workers, from making a deal with a contractor to dealing with the government, all executive decisions are done with at least some attention to ethics. Whether to lie a little, a lot or not at all will be a decision determined by ethics. Whether to skim some money at the top, pad an account, charge a round of drinks to the company credit card: all of these are ethical decisions. When a company designs its business and marketing plans, it does so with attention to ethics. If an organization wants to become a market leader, how far is it willing to go? Is a giant retail company willing to edge out small mom-and-pop businesses in a local community? Does the company CEO hire his nephew? Professional decisions like these reflect the ethical code of the individual as well as of the organization as a whole. When companies make collective decisions, they will often refer to official company codes of ethics. Drafting a code of ethics can therefore be one of the most intelligent steps an organization can make because it offers a set of clear guidelines for behavior and decision-making. In case of a dispute, an employee can open up the ethical code and make a decision based on it.…

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Moral Phenomenology

Moral Phenomenology Sensibility theory enables us to understand morality and ethics from the perspective of the phenomenological depth of a situation. This view or perception transcends the rational and intellectual modes of understanding the phenomenon of morality within the complex context of human experience. The subtle relationship between the body and emotional and intellectual factors in the experience of ethics…

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Marketing Product Safety, and Intellectual

PharmaCare is not socially responsible for their actions towards the community in Colberia. According to the moral compass, individuals or organizations should operate under guidelines and principles of ethics in conducting their duties and to determine what is right and wrong. Although moral compasses vary from one individual to another depending on cultural differences, morality bears that all humans are…

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