Home  >  Subjects  >  current page My Profile

Essays on "Family / Dating / Marriage"  |  Term Papers 1-40

 1 2 3 . . . Last › Filter Options:  

Family & Sociology of Marriage

While stress about financial concerns may lead to both an increase in spousal hostility and a decrease in spousal "warmth" (Freeman, Carlson, & Sperry. 1993, p. 325), it is important to note that such stress can influence cognitive, emotional and behavioral responses among married couples (Dakin and Wampler, 2008). While financial concerns certainly affect the quality of marriage, Rogers (2004) suggests that money worries may exacerbate an already deficient relationship. In other words, money isn't the only reason couples squabble and divorce; it's only the icing on the cake. With the increases in divorce rates, it is important to consider not only the factors that contribute to divorces, but, perhaps even more importantly, what factors are associated with successful marriages. Contributing factors to successful marriages While many resources are available proclaiming to provide the "secret" to a lasting marriage, not all are reliable, less are credible. However, the scholarly literature suggests that successful unions have some commonalities; trust, open communication, humor, physical and sexual intimacy, and ability to compromise, fidelity. Reis and Collins (2000) observe that empathy is strongly correlated with successful marriages. However, with the overwhelming resources available to support marriages and married couples, it seems some factors are strongly associated with the dissolution of marriages. Contributing factors to failed marriages A simple review of the online "literature" suggests that there are many factors and contributors to divorces. Each of these entries are more rife with anger, resentment and betrayal than the last. However, several commonalities again emerge in correlation with failed marriages; infidelity, financial concerns, child rearing practices, spending practices, alcohol and drug use, pornography consumption, young age and the birth of a child, young age when first marrying to name a few. While marriage remains a pursuit for many, it seems that the purpose of marriage, compounded with the ease of divorce, has created an atmosphere of indifference to the once holy sacrament of marriage. The consequences of divorce, of broken families, of broken homes, continue to be of interest to sociologists. However, the impact of increased divorce rates on society and on the individual suggest that marriage, as an institution, is no longer as valued as it once was. References: Dankin, J., Wampler, R. (2008). Money Doesn't Buy Happiness, but It Helps: Marital Satisfaction, Psychological Distress, and Demographic Differences Between Low- and Middle-Income Clinic Couples. The American Journal of Family Therapy, 36:300 -- 311. Freeman, C.,…

Pages: 3  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Recent Socio Demographic Family Change

¶ … Socio-Economic Changes in the Institution of Marriage Because marriage touches upon so many emotional issues on a personal level, it is a particularly 'hot' topic of social controversy. However, much as it is tempting to believe that marriage as we know it has always existed in its current form, this is not the case. Cohabitation, according to Kathleen Kieman's study of European marital and cohabitation habits, is a fairly long-standing institution and has existed covertly or overtly for centuries. Often, working-class couples would have what might today be called 'common law' marriages, or marriages in which they would live together as man and wife, but not be formally united (Kieman 2004: 67). Rates of cohabitation are difficult to measure in the past, given the social stigma attached to open, middle-class 'living together' during the first half of the 20th century. However, it is clear that amongst younger women and men, admitted cohabitation is on the rise, and has become a de facto gateway to marriage for many young people in Europe and the Americas. This new trend towards open, as opposed to covert cohabitation, is changing the way that courtship, coupledom, and child-bearing are viewed across the world. Views of cohabitation still do vary considerably from culture to culture -- in Southern Europe, marriage is the preferred route of entry into partnership, while in the U.S. And Northern Europe, cohabitation is more common (Kieman 2004: 67). In Denmark, Sweden, and the Netherlands, cohabitation is even more common than in the Unites States; in Greece and Portugal, marriage is more common than in Italy and Spain (Kieman 2004: 73). However, some trends are cross-cultural -- Greece was the only nation with an out-of-wedlock birth rate of less than 10%, given the extent to which the practice of cohabitation has become normalized. Along the same lines of Kieman's, Judith Seltzer's study of cohabitation in the modern world likewise stresses how socially 'shaped' and contextual perspectives upon the practice have changed over time, gradually normalizing how cohabitation is viewed. She too sees a trend towards acceptance, although not a universally welcoming one. For example, within Latin America, cohabitating couples and out-of-wedlock births have formal, legal rights, while in the U.S., legal structures still show a strong preference for marriage. But even when there is less social and legal approval, overall, internationally, there is a trend in favor of the escalation of…

Pages: 3  |  Reaction Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Crisis and Resilience in Family

Marriage & Family Marriage and Family: China's Response to Stress The family ecological perspective utilizes a contextual frame of reference that posits the influence on family and family dynamics as it relates to their environment. Through this theoretical lens, practitioners are able to then look at families in relationship to religion, education, financial and economic, cultural, and historical circumstances (Lamanna…

Pages: 5  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 4


Marriage and the Family

Marriage and the Family The institution of marriage and the family is a contentious topic in contemporary society for a number of reasons. One of the most important issues under debate is the decline of marriage and the family in society. Research studies clearly show that the institution of marriage as well as the cohesion of the family is seriously…

Pages: 5  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Genogram Significant Family Events Dolly Is a

Genogram Significant Family Events Dolly is a Punjabi Muslim woman from Malaysia. When Dolly was 16 her family moved to Singapore, where she was raised. Dolly's genogram reveals a lot about the impact of family history, cultural values, class conflict, and gender roles on an individual. The most significant family events in Dolly's life include the death of her father…

Pages: 10  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Sociological Views on Marriage Argument Against Congressman

Sociological Views on Marriage Argument Against Congressman McDonald's Proposal to Abolish Marriage: According to California Congressman McDonald, there is no longer any use of the concept of formal marriage at law. His argument is based on three specific points having to do with the rate of: (1) divorce, (2) cohabitation amongst unmarried couples, and (3) childbirth outside of marriage. That analysis largely ignores the value of marriage for couples who do not divorce; likewise, it ignores the fact that cohabitation serves a valuable purpose as an informal trial of compatibility before marriage; and it ignores the important distinction between planned and unplanned pregnancy and the benefits of a traditional nuclear family to children. If anything, the increased divorce rate is mainly the result of changed societal values and the fact that divorce is no longer associated with the same social stigma as it once was in society. Whereas prior generations of married couples may have had no choice but to remain unhappily married, contemporary married couples have the option of divorce to end unhappy marriages and allow both partners to go on with their lives afterwards. Many times, divorced people eventually find happiness in other marriages that they would never have had the opportunity to do without the divorce option. Therefore, high divorce rates are not necessarily evidence that marriage has become obsolete, particularly since most divorced people do eventually get married again. Similarly, high rates of cohabitation are also more the result of relaxed societal values and norms than they are evidence that cohabitation is necessarily replacing marriage or that cohabitation necessarily fulfills all the functions and provides all the same benefits……

Pages: 2  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Nontraditional Families in America Have

These new programs support the proposition that families can work as same-sex households, mixed race homes, or any other form of nontraditional unit. Similarly, current movies such as The Kids Are All Right do the same on the big screen. To the extent that culture is reflected through its art forms the fact that these television shows and movies are able to present the nontraditional family as normative indicates that the prejudices against nontraditional families are beginning to break down. Twenty years ago same-sex adoption would have been unthinkable in many social circles; interracial marriage was unthinkable and, in some jurisdictions, illegal; cohabitation a disgrace but these attitudes are all changing. The legal barriers to nearly all nontraditional family lifestyle choices are beginning to be removed and support for the traditional family as the ideal is lessening. With time, broader acceptance of the nontraditional family can be expected. As this occurs, the nontraditional family will become the norm and the traditional family will receive less emphasis as the ideal. References Cherlin, A. (1999). Going to Extremes: Family Structure, Children's Well-Being, and Social Science. Demography, 421-428. Dush, C. & . (2009). Marriage and Family: Perspectives and Complexities. New York, NY: Columbia University Press. Gennetian, L. (2005). One or Two Parents? Half or Step Siblings? The Effect of Family on Structure on Young Children's Achievement. Journal of Population Economics, 415-436. Howe, E. (1988). Social Aspects of Physical Planning. The Practice of Local Government Planning . Lawrence v. Texas, 539 U.S. 558, 123 S. Ct. 2472, 156 L. Ed. 2d 508 (U.S. Supreme Court June 26, 2003). Lerner, R. & . (2001). No Basis: What the Studies Don't Tell Us About Same-sex Parenting. Washington, D.C.: Marriage Law Project. Meezan, W. & . (2005). Gay Marriage, Same-Sex Parenting and America's Children. The Future of Children, 97-115. Palmer, S. (2007). Toxic Childhood: How the Modern World is Damaging Our Children and What We Can Do About It. Orion. Schneider, B. & .……

Pages: 5  |  Thesis  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


Family Law and Gay and

His wife claimed that this finding resulted in an inequitable distribution of assets since it lowered the value of the marital interest in the home. The court of appeals found that the evidence did not support the presumed gift by the parents to the husband alone. In the state of Missouri, where the case took place, a gift to both spouses was presumed to be marital property. Conclusion The argument for allowing gay marriage may at first seem to rest upon issues of choice and a lack of state interest in intruding into individual's personal privacy decisions. There seems to be little evidence that gay marriage is substantially detrimental to the psychological health or social development of individuals beyond the difficulties of interracial marriage and other unions that occasionally meet with societal disapproval. The state's right to regulate gay unions seems to fly in the face of the same equal protection clause, as essentially gay partners are discriminated against and deprived of benefits because they are of a particular gender, or cannot have children (although the latter fact is not universally true of gay unions.) Certain religions allow gay marriage, and to not allow individuals to practice their religions, if it is not detrimental to others, violates the first amendment. Moreover, the state's interest in intervening in family privacy seems only augmented by formalized unions, in terms of fairly allocating property during a divorce, when gay unions exist, or of ensuring that families treat their children appropriately in the context of the home environment. If the importance of the social institution of the married family is so beneficial and if the only reason that gays are prohibited from their union is because of their same-sex gender, both the private values as well as the societal values that validate the marital union seem to suggest that allowing gay marriage is both useful and necessary. Works Cited Areen, Judith. Cases & Materials. Fourth Edition. New York: Foundation Press,……

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Non-Traditional Families Gay Couples Grandparents Raising Children Adoptive Families

Non-Traditional Family Structure So-called "non-traditional" families are more common in contemporary American society than so-called "traditional" families, making them the new traditional family. Since most American marriages end in divorce, there is no reason to presume that the traditional family structure is necessarily more beneficial to children. The health, stability, and absence of dysfunction and emotional trauma in the family is much more important in that regard than the superficial structure or makeup of the family. Prior to the late 20th century, the predominant family structure in the United States was a nuclear family consisting of a married husband and wife and their children (Healey, 2008; Macionis, 2007). Married women rarely worked outside the home, especially before World War II, and divorce was not an option for many women in unhappy marriages. During the last quarter of the 20th century, women became a much more important part of the American workforce and much more independent in general. Nowadays, approximately sixty percent of American marriages end in divorce; gay marriage is on the verge of social acceptance; and single parenthood is no longer the exception but the rule. As a result, more American families are one-parent families or same-sex couple families than the traditional nuclear family consisting of a married mother and father and their children (Healey, 2008; Henslin, 2005). There may be good reason to expect that children living in non-traditional families may be happier and healthier in some respects than children living in many traditional families. That would likely be true with respect to those traditional families in which unhappily married parents remain together instead of getting a divorce. This issue is potentially significant precisely because……

Pages: 2  |  Thesis  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Family Ecology

Family Ecology The family is considered the basic unit of the society. It is where a person acquires his/her basic characteristics and habits. They say that the personality of an individual is very much affected by the family background. Since ancient times, the family has been an important organization in the society. The family, among the oldest and most fundamental…

Pages: 8  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 13


Family Social Policy What Are

What is wrong with Canada's family policy? One issue that is brought up by Susan McDaniel is that Canada has a "long-standing tendency to account for social problems in the manner least costly to the society" (McDaniel, 286). In other words, the problem is the family, not historical changes in Canada, or government policies, McDaniel believes, and so with that approach, Canada can pass the responsibility on to the family. Also, Canada's policies toward families are often based on "biases, myths, and misconceptions" about what a family really is or what it should be. A great deal of family research is conducted by men, which McDaniel asserts "…results in an incomplete picture of family"; and moreover, the research men conduct is on "traditional" families which implies that "non-traditional families are deficient, deviant, abnormal, or in the process of becoming traditional" (288-89). As a social worker, one thing that concerns me is the obvious bias shown by the Director of Child Welfare when he reports that his department won't place a child with a "practicing gay or lesbian" (McDaniel, 289). A practicing gay or lesbian family? How condescending. Also, I am concerned with Canada's insistence on making the nuclear family (with the man as breadwinner) the "model"; that shows bias against female-headed households, which is quite common in African-American homes and in Aboriginal homes as well. Works Cited McDaniel, Susan A. (2007). Families, Feminism, and the State. In Power and Resistance. Nova Scotia: Fernwood Publishing.……

Pages: 2  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 2


Arranged Marriages in India vs.

With involvement of the society and the entire extended family, couples are under greater obligation to make their marriage work. Divorce is usually considered the last resort and is presented as an option only when they become unbearable and there appears no possibility of reconciliation. Unlike traditional American marriage, an arranged union in India has greater chance of surviving the trial and tribulations of early years of marriage because of the support of both families, and the entire social system, which is conducive to marriage than divorce. REFERENCE 1) Vijay Gupta, Consensual Marriage: The Indian system of marriage has a superior India Currents; 2/28/1994; 2) Diwan, Paras. Family Law: Law of Marriage and Divorce in India. New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Private Limited, 1983. 3) Prakasa, Rao. Marriage, The Family and Women in India. Printox: South Asia Books,1982. 4) Shuraydi, Muhammad Perceptions of arranged marriages by young Pakistani Muslim women living in a Western society *. Journal of Comparative Family Studies; 9/22/2002; 5) Kurian, George Cross-Cultural Perspectives of Mate-Selection and Marriage. Connecticut: Greenwood Press.……

Pages: 5  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Isolated Life of the Old

Most marriages were arranged, and by the Second Century, divorce was a legal practice. Girls were legally marred at twelve, and, as a wife, served a central role in the social life of the household. Motherhood was centered to the moral guidance of her children, and with a declining birthrate, the Roman government also instituted laws requiring parents to increase the number of their offspring. Because of the great infrastructure of the Roman Empire, and the collective urban life that defined most families, education consisted of less agricultural knowledge and more academic and political. Families were the basic unit of society, and not only important for maintaining the education value, they were the backbone of this most advanced political state. In its reclamation of the old Roman ideas and similar life expectancy, it is not surprising that most states in Renaissance Europe allowed for the girl's legal marrying age to be twelve; her male counterpart could be married at ten. Regardless, Thomas Moore recommended that girls married at eighteen and boys four years later to ensure the adulthood and readiness of those future spouses. A contract between the families would solidify a marriage, and an exchange of dowry and jointure (cash settlement) was expected. Marriage was largely a perfunctory means of power acquisition or stability, ideally shown by the marriage of the royals, like Lord Darnly and Mary Queen of Scotts. Children were viewed as property, and could be given to another master -- for example, they could be apprenticed to a professional and he, then, would be their owner. Wives too were property; society did not favorably allow for their trade. While Anglican England and other Protestant groups allowed for divorce, it was still viewed with question. A child born out of a family (as defined by having a father), legally called a bastard, was not entitled to own property at any point in time, marry, or hold offices, publicly or ecclesiastically. Children were expected to mimic their parents and learn not only useful skills and trades, but also the manners with which a civilized person would expect a young adult to be equipped; this included saying prayers, giving the presence of a devout lifestyle, rising early, and working hard. Family life was focused not only on the transmission of good morals and proper social norms from one adult to its offspring, but also harkened back to the Mesopotamian…

Pages: 2  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Marriages Arranged Marriages Are Common

On the other hand, most arranged marriages start off with fewer expectations which make it easier to build a relationship. It is also true that most people in arranged marriages do eventually fall in love as couples from those countries would testify. With love marriages the problem starts with each person wanting to stay in love as passionately throughout their time together. This is close to impossible because while love may stay and even grow stronger, it changes form. While it was once highly passionate and all about public displays, it may take a less aggressive form with the passage of time- and the couple might start doubting their feelings. However the truth of the matter is that even in this age or time, one can stay in love with one person for good provided both are willing to accept the fact that love will not always be about giving gifts, remembering each other's birthdays and kissing for no reason in a theme park. References 1. Robert Epstein, Editor as a Guinea Pig: Psychology Today, http://cms.psychologytoday.com/articles/index.php?term=pto-20 2. PT Staff, The Love Project. Psychology Today, http://cms.psychologytoday.com/articles/pto-20.html…

Pages: 1  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Family Values in Urban America:

These ideologies have been mixed with propagandas, which have weakened the urban America's conscience and this has resulted to creation of an environment in which there is breakdown of the traditional family values. Referring to studies done by (Michael 143-154)[footnoteRef:10] they listed some of the ideologies that have been brought about by the secular culture and they include; God, religion,…

Pages: 11  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 12


Family Break Up for a

The inevitability of crisis in the family life cannot be avoided; however, the effective efforts of strong families include facing of the crisis as effectively as possible in order to have a minimum harm simultaneously focusing on the growth avenues. The strong families are distinguished from the mode of their addressing to the crisis and magnitude of the attained success…

Pages: 22  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Family the Author of This

Even with the shifts above, there has been a lot of controversy and toiling about what defines a family and what does not. For example, some may hold that the aforementioned lesbians parenting a child is not acceptable and is not a "real" family. However, functionalism would hold that it is so long as the core functions are operating and functioning nonetheless. Factors that influence these directions and perceptions are internal feelings and desires but they are also influenced by society, race, biological gender and ethnicity. Even if a person feels that they are part of a family, this does not mean that the wider society feels this is the case. However, many changes have occurred in the last thirty years including the idea that gay or lesbian couples can adopt kids or be foster parents and people much more commonly having children out of wedlock. Some decry this to be the case but it is happening a lot more nonetheless and society is not wilting as a result (Jayson, 2010). Conclusion While there will always be religious and other cultural forces that will "push back" on what it means to be a family, it is undeniable that there has been a paradigm shift on what defines family and what does not. What has not changed is the core functions of the family and even non-traditional iterations of family in the United States and other countries manifest in the form of family even if the forms themselves are controversial to some. These shifts will no doubt continue to become more common and society will probably eventually become more accepting. References Jayson, S. (2010, November 25). What does a 'family' look like nowadays? - USATODAY.com. What does a 'family' look like nowadays? - USATODAY.com. Retrieved August 12, 2014, from http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/yourlife/sex-relationships/marriage/2010-11-18-pew18_ST_N.htm Levin, J. (2004, August 24). Functionalism. Stanford University. Retrieved August 9, 2014, from http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/functionalism/…

Pages: 2  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Culture of Poland the Country of Poland

Culture of Poland The country of Poland has a rich history and while it is not commonly known, Poland was home to many Jews prior to what is termed a 'Hitler's Horror' in Poland. Several alternative names exist for the country of Poland however, in the tenth century the name 'Polanie' is reported to have been derived from the name…

Pages: 8  |  Term Paper  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 10


Divorce and Communication in the

Communication requires both good transmission skills (articulation) and good receptive skills (listening) (Dreyfus, 2002). Without both, communication will be at best difficult (Dreyfus, 2002). Active listening, once learned can prevent misunderstandings and serve to keep emotions under control. It is difficult to react emotionally if you are truly listening and have to communicate understanding before you get a chance to react (Dreyfus, 2002). Finally, maintaining a contemporary marriage is no easy task, and requires hard work. According to the relevant research, a successful marriage is a relationship between two people that is fulfilling, enhancing of one's sense of self-esteem, emotionally gratifying, nurturing, and supportive. Marriage, like any other worthwhile endeavor, requires patience and practice. When there is difficulty, it may require outside help (Dreyfus, 2002). Today's marriages are more than just two people living under the same roof; they are complex and dynamic entities that become even more complex as children enter the picture (Dreyfus, 2002). Thus, maintaining a marriage is one of our most significant challenges. I truly believe that communication is necessary to make a marriage work and last in the long run. My own interpersonal communication can be improved by understanding the cause of a problem and letting others know my feelings on the subject. If I remain silent, no one will know that there is a problem and my feelings of anger will just escalate until I eventually blow up. When this occurs, it is too late to solve the problem. Although I am not married and have no plans to marry soon, I can implement an improved communication in other parts of my life. I can also improve my communication in my friendships, to ensure that these friendships last just as a marriage would. After all, friendship is an important and necessary aspect of a marriage as well. One way I can better communicate is to express anger appropriately, and even constructively. As a result, I can better understand myself and my reactions to certain things, and maintain an open method of communication. Finally, I chose this topic because communication is very important in all types of relationships, can be applied to every kind of situation one might encounter. Bibliography Boland, J.P. & Follingstad, D.R. (1987). The relationship between communication and marital satisfaction: a review. J Sex Marital Ther. 13(4), 286-313. Dreyfus, Edward. (2002). Making your Marriage Work. Retrieved June 28, 2005 from http://www.planetpsych.com/psychology101/relationships/making_marriage_work.htm. National…

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Victims of Intimate Violence: Laci

Meadows (2010) assert that six people die each day in the United States under the arms of a spouse or an intimate partner. Twenty seven hundred people or close to a million people annually experience physical assaults from their intimate partners. Most people sometimes hold violent or homicidal thoughts toward their intimate partners or spouses. While majority of these people…

Pages: 10  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 6


2003) Men and Women: Becoming

Whether these links are causal or correlative has not been proven; however, they do provide a startling picture. It is clear that divorce causes problems for many, especially for the children involved. Children from divorced homes often show an increase in interpersonal problems, which can present themselves in childhood, and can actually get worse in adulthood. Remarriage is no better, as second marriage divorce rates are higher than first marriage divorce rates. Large-scale studies have shown that in homes where parents stay together, even if they do not get along, may actually provide a better environment for children, versus a divorced home environment. Only children who are in homes that have an extremely high incidence of conflict, such as abuse, benefited from divorce. In fact, divorce actually makes situations worse for the children. Studies concluded that the best overall outcome is for parents to work out their problems (Popenoe, 2004). By having clear expectations going into a marriage, as well as exploring all possibilities before deciding to divorce, I believe that the intimacy of a marriage can be increased. Being more open and honest results in couples being closer. With the absence of lies and deception, couples can be more at ease with each other. By considering cohabitation before marriage, considering each individual's happiness of monogamy before marriage, and only considering divorce after all other avenues have been exhausted will result in a closer, stronger marriage. REFRENCES Keen, Sam. (2003) Men and women: Becoming together. Intimate Partners. (pp. 389-397). Lewis, C.S. (1988) The four loves. Retrieved from http://duquesne.docutek.com/eres /download.aspx?docID=12758&shortname=lewis.PDF The National Marriage Project. (2000, June) The state of our unions 2000: The social health of marriage in America. Retrieved http://duquesne.docutek.com/eres/download.aspx?docID =4329&shortname=nmpar2000_1.pdf The National Marriage Project. (2009, February) The state of our unions 2008: The social health of marriage in America. Retrieved from http://www.virginia.edu/marriageproject /pdfs/2008update.pdf The National Marriage Project. (2004, June) The state of our unions 2004: The social health of marriage in America. Retrieved http://duquesne.docutek.com/eres /download.aspx?docID=4307&shortname=soou2004_1.pdf Popenoe, David. (2004) Top ten myths of divorce. Retrieved from http://duquesne.docutek.com /eres/download.aspx?docID=4304&shortname=myths_of_divorce_1.htm Wilcox, W.B. (2009) The evolution of divorce. National affairs, 81-94. http://www.virginia.edu/marriageproject/pdfs/Wilcox_Fall09.pdf…

Pages: 5  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


South American Country of Uruguay

There is an inherent expectation that most women will have some sort of career. Nearly half of the school population in Uruguay is female. (Family Life, Pg 2) Educational opportunities have long been available for Uruguayan women throughout the country. They have been provided with access to all levels of schooling including higher education. The result is that middle-class women have had a great deal of access to the ability to work. Indeed, by the nineteen-sixties over one quarter of all Uruguayan women worked. By 1985, forty-five percent of the women in Montevideo were working. (Family Life, Pg 1) Part of the reason women that have had such access to work has been the availability of domestic labor. Servants - usually female - who are willing to work for relatively low wages are available throughout the nation. This phenomenon exists in part because of the fact that there is a middle class in the country which is growing rapidly in urban areas. However, in rural areas, the poor continue to remain poor resulting in an ever-widening gap between the haves and the have-nots. The average household in Uruguay has 3.4 people in it. In the Urban areas this tends to be on the lesser side, whereas in rural areas there tend to be more children. In the urban areas birth control is used regularly. Urban families prefer less children so that they are able to provide them with the best education possible. In rural areas, large families tend to be sexually imbalanced. Women often leave the poor families so that they might find work in an urban area. Generally these women are those that become the domestic servants. The result is that there are many males without counterparts in these regions. (Family Life, Pg 2) Family connections in rural areas tend to be stronger than in the urban. One traditional rural family practice known as compadrazgo revolves around baptism. The baby is provided with a godfather who is usually a little better off than others in the region. The idea is that when the child matures and becomes an adult, the godfather will help to find him or her employment. As the godfather is often in an elite class and the godchild is in a subordinate class, this practice helps to create positive interaction between the classes. (Family Life, Pg 3) Both upper and lower class families have traditional get-togethers…

Pages: 4  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


What's the Impact of the Education Level Have on Marital Status of Both Genders

Education Level Marriage Gender Divorce is one of the most persistent and troubling social phenomena of our time. The dissolution of marriage has long reaching implications for all affected parties as well as for the broader community. To better understand the phenomena of divorce one must look at trends of divorce, remarriage and the demographic characteristics that are significant in…

Pages: 4  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Andean Society What's Your Gut Reaction? My

Andean Society What's your gut reaction? My gut reaction is that some ideas of gender parallelism make a lot of sense. In most modern societies, only the male side of the family is continued through marriage. Wives take their husbands' names and if they have no brothers, their family names die out even though they give just as many genes to their children as their husbands. In that sense, gender parallelism is a more accurate way of tracking heredity than the artificial way most human societies pass along only the family heritage of males after marriage. Explain the ayllu. Explain gender parallelism and how this influenced how Andean women gained resources in the ayllu. The ayllu (or community) allowed all Andean members of society the same rights to community regardless of whether they were male or female. Andean men considered themselves to be part of a heritage from their father's side of the family and Andean women considered themselves to be part of a heritage from their mother's side. Unlike many more modern human societies, the Andean people allowed women independent rights to the community resources. In many other societies, women could not own property on their own and only had rights through their fathers and husbands, the Andean women had property rights of their own. 3. How did Andean societies view relationships between men and women, especially as reflected in the ritual of marriage? Andean societies emphasized the concept of equality between the sexes in marriage. They did not view the wife as the property of her husband or as subservient to him. After marriage, Andean husbands and wives were viewed as being two equal interdependent parts of a new whole unity. Even the marriage rituals and ceremonies expressed this concept. Husbands and wives exchanged ritual gifts of equal value. Their families did the same, unlike other societies where the bride's family gives money and other valuable to the husband's family as though they have to compensate the husband because he has accepted the burden of caring for their daughter in marriage. 4. What work in……

Pages: 2  |  Book Report  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Cohabitation Epidemic

Cohabitation Epidemic," Neil Clark Warren claims that cohabiting couples would be much better off tying the knot. To back up his claims, Warren draws from a number of sources ranging from the Bible to "numerous empirical studies," which the author fails to list or cite. Moreover, the essay comes across as ironic given Warren wrote a book with the frivolous title, How to Know if Someone is Worth Pursuing in Two Dates or Less. "The Cohabitation Epidemic" also fails on a rhetorical level. Warren fails to address the underlying assumption of the essay that marriage represents an ideal social contract. Warren admits that "few live-in couples intend to have children" but does not defend the usefulness of marriage in childfree relationships. Finally, Warren uses sensationalized statistics to support the central argument without clarifying the source or parameters of the data. Cohabitation is in many situations preferable to marriage, and in some cases is the only option such as for same-sex couples. Rather than representing an epidemic, cohabitation represents shifting social norms. As Warren suggests, cohabitation sometimes offers couples a test-run for an intended marriage. Cohabitation is the only way to find out what life with someone is really like during the day-to-day chores, the creation of routine, and dealing with idiosyncrasies and quirks. Simply dating a person does not reveal much about what that person might be like over the long haul. Pinsof states that cohabitation is "a legitimate end-state in itself," and "a legitimate form of pre-marriage," (cited in "The Experts Speak"). When Warren argues that marriage after a period of cohabitation is less likely to last than a marriage entered into without cohabitation, the author does not acknowledge the fact that many cohabiting couples deliberately choose not to marry. Some choose not to marry because they find no meaning in the legal contract that binds them together. Warren assumes that marriage is a desirable condition for individuals and for social stability. When viewed as an end in itself, Warren's argument falls apart. Marriage is not necessarily a "defining characteristic of family" for many individuals (Seltzer). Many individuals accept the fact that relationships are not all meant to be life-long and prefer cohabiting because of the freedom it provides. Especially for couples that……

Pages: 2  |  Thesis  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 3


Philippa Gregory

¶ … Philippa Gregory, the author of "The Other Boleyn Girl" and other novels. Specifically, it will discuss the relevant aspects of the time and place in which the author lived and wrote the novels. Philippa Gregory is a best selling novelist from England who writes often about Tudor history, such as this novel. It is the fictional story of…

Pages: 8  |  Thesis  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 5


Aging and Social Isolation

Gerontology Aging and Social Isolation This article relates to gerontology because it discusses two studies of aging men (58 black men aged 65 to 96), and discusses whether they are isolated from their family or not. It relates to aging because it involves studying the aged and how family structure changes as people age. This study involves statistics, gerontology, and sociology, and used demographics as the basis for the questions and results of the study. The article is from a respected journal on aging, and so, the credibility of the article is not in question. This study indicates that family relationships are an important issue as a person ages, and that most black men enjoy close familial relationships. Thus, this is not only an aging issue, it is a family issue. However, it is not a male issue, as the study indicated black women enjoy essentially the same close relationships with family members. The article summarizes the results of this study, and looks into the relatively few other studies conducted among black families with aging relatives. They conclude that aging black men enjoy good relationships with their wives, and close bonds with their children……

Pages: 1  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


John Updike Short Stories Twice

John Updike Short Stories Twice the recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, before his death John Updike was one of America's preeminent writers and for more than fifty years has portrayed life in America through his stories, essays, and poetry. He is known for his ability to comprehensively describe things, giving the reader a full connection to the story through the use of elaborate language. Updike himself has been quoted stating "my only duty was to describe reality as it had come to me- to give the mundane its beautiful due." ("John Updike Biography") Everyday issues have been used by Updike as the basis of his fictional stories, including family, religion, and sex. One example of this is the short story "Wife Wooing" in which Updike describes an evening in the life of a married family man and his emotional and physical attraction to his wife. Another story, "My Father's Tears," depicts the narrator's entire marriage over a long period of time and its ultimate failure. Both stories contain similarities, for instance they both deal with relationship issues, particularly marriage, however, there are significant differences as well. A single night of bringing home hamburgers, eating them in front of a fire, and going to bed is the majority of the story "Wife Wooing:" which portrays a man's attempt to have sex with his wife of seven years. After dinner and putting the children to bed, the man attempts to woo his wife into intimate relations, however, her interest in a current book becomes the cause of his frustration. The husband's emotional state is vividly described by Updike as being quite titillated with his wife's body, however, even though the two have been married for seven years and have three children, he finds that he must still woo his wife in order to engage in physical intimacy. "Wife. A knife of a word that for all its final bite did not end the wooing. To my Wonderment." (Updike, 2003, p.350) By describing the term "wife" as "a knife of a word," Updike describes the husband's frustration with the reality of marriage as opposed to his imagination. His wife is no longer the woman that she was seven years ago, she, and their marriage, have evolved and transformed over the years; and her refusal to reciprocate his amorous advances is symbolic of the transformation of their marriage. When the story picks…

Pages: 4  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Role of Tradition Communities Are Defined by

¶ … Role of Tradition Communities are defined by their traditions. It is the fact that a community has shared traditions that make it able to be defined as the community. To be considered a community, it is generally recognized that a group of people must share some basic characteristics, which enables people to say that they share a lifestyle. These characteristics include a shared language, shared morals, and other traditions. In fact, language may be the most basic idea of a tradition, because language involves a community's consensus about expression. The traditional aspect of language can be understood by looking at smaller communities speaking the same broader language, because the connotation of words can differ from group to group, though the denotation remains consistent. Language is not the only traditional aspect of community that can vary in importance and meaning depending on the smaller group involved; any tradition can exhibit that characteristic. For example, marriage is another long-recognized traditional aspect of most cultures and communities, but feelings about marriage differ from culture to culture. For communities that view women as commodities, marriage is a way of legalizing the transfer of rights in a woman from a father to a husband. However, for communities that place great importance on the nuclear family and raising children, marriage is viewed as a way of ensuring that children have a two-parent home. For other communities, marriage serves as a means of formalizing fidelity and its requirements. Finally, in some communities marriage serves dual purposes. Therefore, while some communities may share traditions, it is important to realize that traditions can have different meaning depending on the context of the surrounding community. Because traditions and their meaning vary from community to community, it is fair to say that traditions can define their communities. For many subgroups, traditions help define cultural, ethnic, and religious identity. These traditions can be serious and life-defining, such as gender role expectations and community repercussions for defying those expectations. However, traditions can also be relatively unimportant to outsiders, such as decorations for holidays or traditional foods. Traditions define and determine how cultures celebrate important social milestones, like attaining adulthood, marrying, having children, aging, and death. Furthermore, when a society's traditions begin to change, that frequently precedes a major change in the culture's underlying values and beliefs. At first blush, it appears that traditions would promote unity, because traditions arise from a…

Pages: 3  |  Term Paper  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 0


(1982) by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

If Angela had not engaged in premarital sex she would have married into a very wealthy family. Pedro and Pablo are obligated to avenge their sister's honor by the prevailing culture. Their lawyer at their trial asserted that the homicide was a legitimate defense of honor. The brother's declare at the end of the trial that they would have "done it again a thousand times over for the same reason" (p. 47). According to the narrator of the story, "There had never been a death more foretold" (p. 50). Even though the brothers openly declare their intent to a number of the town's people before the crime, clearly indicating premeditation, they are only sentence to three years in prison. The narrator reveals initially it was Pedro who made the decision to kill Santiago and that hi brother was only following along. When the mayor disarmed them Pedro considered his duty fulfilled. However, Pablo insisted that the brothers carry out their duty to defend the family honor. Pablo told his brother, "There is no way out of thisIt's as if it had already happened" (p. 61). It is also revealed that there are other motivations for Pablo's insistence that they carry out the murder. Pablo's fiance, Prudencia Cotes states, "I knew what they were up toand I didn't only agree, I would never have married him if he hadn't done what a man should do" (p. 62). In fact when they were at her families hose and the coffee was not yet ready Pablo said, "We'll leave it for later. We're in a hurry now" and Prudencia's mother says, "I can imagine my sonshonor doesn't wait" (P. 62). After the murder the brother's turn themselves in at the church to Father Amador who recalls the surrender "as an act of great dignity" (p. 49). "We killed him openly," Pedro Vicario said, "but we're innocent." "Perhaps before God," said Father Amador. "Before God and before men," Pablo Vicario said, "it was a matter of honor" (p.49). Santiago's fiancee, Flora Miguel, was both outraged and crushed by the news that the Vicario twin's were after him for dishonoring their sister. "It occurred to her that they would force him to marry Angela Vicario in order to give her back her honor. She went through a crisis of humiliation" (p.112). She gathered his letters and put them in a chest and when Santiago went…

Pages: 4  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 1


Expressions of Commitment and Relational Uncertainty as

¶ … Expressions of Commitment and Relational Uncertainty as Predictors of Relationship Quality and Stability over Time This qualitative research study published in Communication Reports in 2011 was conducted to examine the question of how the communication of commitment is associated with relationship well-being. Daniel J. Weigel, Camille Brown and Cailin Kulp O'Riordan observe that though relationships are important to well-being, many have difficulty in constructing relationships that endure. The purpose of this study was to look at how communication of commitment, commitment level, relational uncertainty and relationship well-being are linked over time. The author's proposed 6 hypotheses: H1) Commitment level and reported use of commitment indicators are positively associated with subsequent perceptions of relationship quality over time. H2) Use of the commitment indicators mediates the relationship between commitment level and relationship quality over time. H3) People who remain in their relationships are more likely to report higher commitment levels and greater use of commitment indicators at Time 1 than people whose relationships break up. H4) Relational uncertainty is negatively associated with perceptions of relationship quality over time. H5) Use of the commitment indicators mediates the relationship between relational uncertainty and relationship quality over time. H6) People who remain in their relationships report less relational uncertainty at Time 1 than people whose relationships break up. Rusbult's investment model provides the theoretical framework for examining relationship commitment. This model defines commitment as involving a long-term orientation, a desire for the relationship to persist, and an attachment to one's partner. Knobloch and Soloman voice the rational for examining uncertainty in relationships. They define relational uncertainty as "the degree of confidence people have in their perceptions of involvement with others. More specifically, people can be uncertain about their own participation in a relationship, their partner's participation, and the relationship's future" (p.41). Convenience sampling was used to recruit 230 university students, 175 female and 55 males, enrolled in undergraduate classes from two western universities. Of these 22 were married, 12 engaged, 179 seriously dating, and 12 casually dating. The mean relationship……

Pages: 2  |  Article Review  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 1


Domestic Violence & Its Effects Reason Why

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE & ITS EFFECTS Reason why people left their own home (country) General idea about domestic violence/welfare and API Domestic Violence Specific to API Women - Vietnamese Distinguishing dynamics Meaning of physical abuse Abusive community norms Negative Effects on the community Language as well as culture Mental health Issues of Family & child rearing Question & Answer for Immigrant…

Pages: 12  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Sociological Perspectives in Relation to Causes of

¶ … sociological perspectives in relation to causes of divorce. These include the Functionalist Perspective, the Feminist Perspective, the Internationalist Perspective, and the Conflict Perspective. Black divorce rates are higher that white divorce rates and the rates for most other minorities. Why is this so? There are many causes of black divorce, but the sociological causes are very important when…

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Emotional and Social Development in Middle Adulthood

Emotional and Social Development in Middle Adulthood Middle Adulthood This paper highlights the phases of a human being's emotional and social development. It also describes the challenges faced by a person when he enters the middle age. The paper explains the emotional and social changes that occur in a person's life during middle adulthood and how these changes help in…

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4


Shrek: Dating, Marriage, Parenting and Family Interaction

Shrek: Dating, Marriage, Parenting and Family Interaction In the movies, Shrek 1, 2 & the Third, themes relating to dating, courtship, engagement, marriage, child bearing and family interactions can be found throughout each film. The fairytale couple, Shrek the ogre and Fiona the beautiful princess/turned ogre, eventually lives out the "happily ever after" story, but must first overcome some real-life struggles with each other, friends, family and children. The first film primarily deals with first love, courtship, engagement and marriage, with Shrek rescuing Fiona, the damsel in distress, and their quest for love despite the many obstacles to their relationship. The complications they face are obvious from the start of the first movie and continue throughout the trilogy. One major stumbling block is Shrek's opinion of himself, as he clearly has poor self-esteem issues. In the first film, Shrek doesn't feel he is worthy of Fiona's love; in the second, he doesn't think of himself as a worthy husband, and in the third, he struggles with worthiness as future king and becoming a father. In the beginning, Shrek is a loner and tries to keep to himself, more out of fear of rejection than anything else. And his friendship with Donkey brings out some critical points about how Shrek views himself. Upon rescuing Fiona, he is supposed to deliver her to Lord Farquaad, and perhaps because of self-esteem issues, never dreams of keeping her for himself. On the other hand, Fiona has a very clear mindset on how she thinks "true love" is supposed to happen to her. Shrek and Fiona's relationship is seemingly doomed from the start because Fiona believes that upon rescuing her from the dragon-guarded tower she has been locked in for years, her knight is supposed to render "love's first kiss" and they are to be married and live happily ever after. When Shrek delivers none of the elements in Fiona's perfect dream, she begins to wonder if there is something wrong with her that is hampering the start of her first love relationship. As the two work things out about themselves and each other, Shrek and Fiona are able to come together as a couple and appreciate one another's strengths as well as weaknesses. In marrying Shrek, Fiona's "true form" takes the shape of a female ogre, and the two seem like a match made in heaven. Of course the underlying theme of friendship with…

Pages: 4  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Family Systems and Marriage Preparation

Family system theory does not only include aspects of dealing with the family of origin of eth couples but it also deals with the structure of the new family that the couple will want to engage in . Hence, another important aspect of the family systems theory is the recognition of the responsibilities that the couples feel they will like…

Pages: 4  |  "Literature Review" Chapter  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 6


Marriage and Family Experience Approaches Marriage as

¶ … Marriage and Family Experience approaches marriage as the one thing that counts in a person's life, making one what one is and providing one with the most loving and intimate experiences, and providing relationships that need to be cherished, honored and supported. In this relationship, says the text, there is no place for jealousy. Friendship, love and commitment are the strong glue that holds a marriage together. Marriage begins after a courtship that includes the experience of being single and then paring up with someone and sometimes cohabitation before marriage. Following the wedding, the family process begins, which includes family life cycles, decisions on whether to have children and parenthood, if the choice is made to include children. Many issues bear on the success of a marriage, such as economics, child-rearing, the needs and expectations of the partners and their extended families, caregiving, ethnic issues, work issues and conflicts, the "time bind" and outside forces. Sometimes one or both of the partners are abusive. Divorce and separation are the results of the above, when a married couple can no longer tolerate the pressures. The effects of divorce on children, no matter how terrible the pressures of other issues may have been on the marriage, are quite large. Experts disagree on the consequences of divorce on children in the family. Wallerstein and Hetherington are two of the experts who have studied the long-term impact of divorce on families. Mavis Hetherington has found that 10% of children from divorced families have, on the average, more problems in school, with behavior and negative self-concepts that would require some type of professional help. The statistics were 74% of the boys and 66% of the girls were in the normal range, while 26% of the boys and 34% of the girls were in the problematic range. Other researchers found the statistics about the same and some even found that 40% of young adults from divorced families actually did better than those from non-divorcing families (Hughes 1). Judith Wallerstein found that children from divorced families grow up faster than others, "forfeiting their own childhoods," in order to……

Pages: 2  |  Term Paper  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 0


Arranged Marriages v. Traditional Dating:

It would be probably be false to say that partners who opt for an arranged marriage did not consider appearance a factor. A person does not need to be a supermodel, but hardly no one wants a person who is sloppy, dirty and otherwise unkept. Mr. Asano assumes the reason for the high divorce rate among Americans is because marriages were entered prematurely. He further assumes that both partners are usually immature and just looking to have fun. Comparing divorce rates among different countries and cultures is like comparing apples to oranges. In America, if a relationship is unhappy, unloving and counterproductive both partners are more likely to dissolve the relationship, if counseling and other methods to keep the couple together fail. However, Japanese may be more likely to stay in relationships even if it compromises their person. The freedom that is exercised by Americans may not be readily exercised in the Japanese culture. As a matter of fact, some Japanese women tolerate or even encourage their husband to visit a Geisha (a glorified prostitute) to "unwind" while most American women will do nothing of the sort. The divorce rates reflect differences in attitudes and beliefs between Japanese and Americans. Finally, it is presumptive and arrogant to conclude that arranged marriages are better or more successful than marriages resulting from traditional dating as Yumiko Asano has stated. If a person wishes to date traditionally and have fun and have many experiences, then that is that person's decision. If a person chooses to have a matchmaker find him or her a mate, then that method is acceptable as well. Successful marriages are not predetermined by the method in which partners use to find their mate. Each couple should define success in marriage for themselves, whether happiness or financial stability or both be the primary goal. Mr. Asano's narrow-minded view of a successful marriage sheds a blind eye on all the many people who are in successful marriages, by their own definition of the word. Success in marriage as little to do with how one finds a mate, it has to do with how steadfast each partner is in maintaining the ideals and commitment that each have made to one……

Pages: 2  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Marriage and Dating in the

Vows were then exchanged, much like we see in marriages today, before the priest then blessed the rings then exchanged by now husband and wife. At this moment they would enter the church and kneel before the altar as the priest offered a prayer, thus concluding the wedding. Theoretically, no one could force another into marriage, and if a marriage occurred that way, it was invalid. That meant that a lord could not marry off his serfs, daughters, sisters, etc., without their consent. Of course, pressure could be brought to bear on a stubborn woman, and later proving that the consent was coerced could be difficult" (Hunter, 2002). Nowadays, arranged marriages are rare in the Western world, and forced marriages are punishable by law. Still, not much has changed when it comes to the actual marriage ceremony that undoubtedly is steeped in traditions that stem from practices of the Middle Ages. Dating in the modern world, on the other hand, has changed compared to the Middle Ages. There are still many qualities, like wealth and property that sadly many people base their 'perfect' marriage partner on. We generally are more attracted towards someone's physique and 'wallet' before we know what they are like as an individual. Though there are those who are the exception to the rule. These days there are a variety of 'matchmakers' at our disposal. Whereas during the Middle Ages, the Lord was legally allowed to match up serfs in his kingdom, in this modern age we have everything from blind dates set up by friends to newspaper classifieds, online dating services, and 'mail-order brides'. Marriage ceremonies today also transcend traditional church ceremonies, and it is not uncommon for cross-cultural marriages and neo-pagan ceremonies occur in their place. The one factor of marriages that has lasted through the ages is the need of consent from the two people involved. Traditional aspects of wedding ceremonies, like vows, and the exchange of wedding rings are reminiscent of marriages in the Middle Ages. Flower girls were also seen in Middle Age marriages, and were usually related sister who would carry wheat before the bride in the procession. Flowers were later used, and the flower girls would throw petals for the bride to walk upon. The Church, immigration and, more recently, Free Will has molded marriage and dating since the Middle Ages. Sex before marriage isn't considered as forbidden as it…

Pages: 4  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Marriage & Family -- Research Analysis Journal

Marriage & Family -- Research Analysis Journal Article on Marital Happiness: An assessment For the purpose of this paper, I will be reviewing the work of Shaifali Sandhya entitled the Social Context of Marital Happiness in Urban Indian Couples: Interplay of Intimacy and Conflict which appeared on the Journal of Marital and Family Therapy on January 2009. This review shall begin with the description of the research problem as well as the research methods utilized in this study. The second and final part of this article will be devoted to the review and assessment of the analysis and interpretation of data. Sandhya's work (2009) opens with a clear research objective, i.e. To "examine marital happiness in urban Hindu husbands and wives in the context of a globalizing India" (ibid, p. 74). In order to achieve this stated objective, the author outlined five specific questions or problems that this research aims to answer/address: "(1) were Indian husbands and wives happy? (2) whether the processes of conflict and intimacy that led to happiness of American couples also affected the happiness of Indian husbands and wives; (3) the expression and experience of conflict and intimacy in Indian marriages; (4) whether intimacy or conflict was more predictive of their marital happiness; and (5) to investigate whether family living arrangements affected the happiness of Indian couples" (ibid, p. 75). Through these particular questions, the research objective underwent the process of operationalization in order for us, the readers, to see specific parameters and dimensions that the researcher will explore in order to meet the study's main objective. According to Kroelinger (2002), a good problem statement provides an operational definition such that the variables are defined operationally wherein a concept is defined in terms of the operations or processes that will be utilized to measure the concept. Along these lines, it can be argued that the research problem of Sandhya is a good one because we're able to extract particular variables that are crucial in this study, i.e. "marital happiness" which will be measured in terms of intimacy and conflict, "Indian context" which provides a clear context of the study, "globalization," to be gauged in terms of the changing living arrangements brought about by a globalizing social context. II. Research Methodology A research methodology is defined as the "system of explicit rules and procedures upon which research is based and against which claims for knowledge are evaluated"…

Pages: 4  |  Thesis  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 4

 1 2 3 . . . Last ›

 

Disclaimer