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Essays on "Fashion / Designers / Beauty"  |  Term Papers 1-40

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Emerging Fashion Designers in Turkey

Turkish Designers It has been argued that the Turkish designers can be considered which conceives beauty as a universal coordinate. However, one should ask himself if there is any way that these designers can be identified as a group through the ethnic characteristics of their works. We have already seen that they bring numerous elements from their cultural background into…

Pages: 8  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 10


20th Century Fashion and Designers

The new century began with a continuation of art nouveau influence in fashion and as skirts swirled around the feet of women forming in fans like bell flowers, so did the hats swirl and swoop around the head." But she also notes that hats of the time favored "lavish brims" and "flora, ribbon rosettes, or plumage." To support the large hats, extensive hair supports, consisting of braids, or even collected excess hair, had to be constructed. As Maginnis notes, men at the turn of the twentieth century looked to the style of the "Arrow Shirt Man" drawn by J.C. Leyendecker. Leyendecker was a German immigrant who trained as an illustrator at the Chicago art institute. Vadeboncoeur claims that, "The Arrow Collar Man was the counterpoint of The Gibson Girl and was one of the most successful advertising images in history. It turned Arrow into the largest collar/shirt brand in America." The "Arrow Shirt Man" wore colorful shirts, hard white tubular collars, and sport jackets. The "Arrow Shirt Man." Image courtesy of Costumes.org. Works cited: Maginnis, Tara. (2008). "The Turn of the 20th Century." Web. . Fortnuy Company. (2010). "Legacy." Web. . Westin Tomas, Pauline. (2010). "Edwardian Hats and Hair Fashion." Web. . Vadeboncoeur, Jim. (1999). "Leyendecker." Web. .…

Pages: 2  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Favorite Fashion Designer

¶ … Fashion Designer "Lim knows how fashionable women want to dress." -Nicole Phelps Vogue Phillip Lim launched his first collection with money he borrowed from a friend and fabric supplier Wen Zhou in 2004 (NY Mag 2010). His collection became a critical hit almost immediately after the launch. What helped spur his popularity was the fact that "It" girls like Natalie Portman and Kate Hudson adored his creations (2010). This helped fuel the demand of more than $12 million wholesale by his third season (2010). He is known for creating garments for women that have both a girly sort of refinement as well as a laid sensibility. Some of his creations also have a quirky quality to them, which appeals to original and creative wearers like Kate Bosworth and Scarlett Johansson (2010). Lim has three labels -- 3.1 Phillip Lim, kid by Phillip Lim, and Go Green by Phillip Lim. The first label, 3.1 Phillip Lim, launched in 2005, is ready-to-wear and resort style clothing and is similar to ready-to-wear labels like Theory, Chloe, Marni, and Vince (NY Mag 2010).. Kid by Phillip Lim is an American children's line of clothing that was first launched in 2007. Go Green by Phillip Lim was launched in 2009 and is ready-to-wear clothing as well with an eco-inspired touch. Phillip Lim is the son of Chinese immigrants. He grew up in Orange County, California, where his mother worked 18-hour days as a seamstress in a garment factory (Dorment 2010). He has said that coming from a very traditional Asian-American family, he felt compelled to go into a career like law or medicine, so he went to college and majored in business. Lim notes that it took him three years to realize that he hated business and he ended up graduating with a degree in home economics (sewing, nutrition, nursing, etc.,……

Pages: 2  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Gender and Power in Beauty Pageant Culture

Gender and Power in Beauty Pageant Culture Review of the Relevant Literature. How Beauty Pageants Define Gender, Hierarchy and Power. According to Poran (2002), the majority of research on beauty to date has focused on gender differences in the experience of physical attractiveness. "The beauty standard," she says, "holds much more importance for women than for men" (p. 65). The…

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Fashion Individuality and Self-Expression as

But Barbie is also a plastic doll that represents the ideal woman. Young girls are bombarded with images of Barbie. Barbie is also packaged to appeal to young girls and their likes. Much like a celebrity who has everything a teenager aspires to, Barbie is portrayed as having what young girls aspire to. As a doll for young girls, Barbie…

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Fashion Early Middle Ages the

There are definitive layers in this ensemble: the scarf tucked around the neck of the cape garment, over the simple black skirt, tights, and boots. The striking black sunglasses contrast the chosen beige color and offset the full head-cover and the tall, folded, purple, suede, boots add a touch of appropriate three-musketeer-ism. Renaissance In Eastern Europe, early renaissance fashion for women was similar to medieval dress. The concepts of simplicity and layering continued although throughout the period, innovation in fashion began to take shape as fabrics, dyes, and costume making methods advanced. Common attire for an early Renaissance woman would include of a kirtle, chemise, and gown. The kirtle was a modest full skirt worn with a linen top called a chemise. The gown was worn over the kirtle. It had a full skirt split in the front, to show the kirtle, and had a basque style waistline. A typical gown was made from woven wool or linen. A Renaissance garment for the elite was more elaborate, tailored, and complex including padded shoulders, embroidered fabrics, and jeweled decorations. Various fashion features from the renaissance period continue to be seen in fashion today. In the Michael C. creation (Spring 2011 collection) shown above in the first photo, renaissance qualities can be found in the full length, split skirt and bodice. In the second picture, Model Natasha Poly displays a tailored suit with 17th century Renaissance features such as the elaborate sleeves and basque waistline. The third illustration[footnoteRef:3] shows a Dolce & Gabbana design which captures the Italian Renaissance. It features decadent fabric, high padded shoulders, high neck, and a split gown and kirtle effect. [3: http://www.theinsider.com/news, (accessed Nov 28, 2005).] Baroque Periods The Baroque era brought a distinctive shift in fashion. Fabrics with their natural qualities were replaced by a stiff starched look. Trim consisted primarily of buttons and lace. The neckline for women's fashion became wide and square, and waistlines were raised. Sleeves were draped softly below the elbow, revealing the wearer's lower arm. In the first photo above Dolce and Gabbana (Fall 2009) embraced baroque sense of extravagance, the deep broad neckline, and full bodied sleeves. A baroque style is also displayed in the richness of the chosen fabric. In the second photo, designers Roksanda Ilincic (Fall 2009) also captures baroque flare through choice of sophisticated fabric and dramatic formed sleeves. In addition, the designer broadness the model's silhouette,…

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Fashion Photography Advertising in High End Women's Magazines

Fashion Photography Advertising in High- End Women's Magazines Typology: Fashion Photography in the Form of Advertising, for High-End Women's Magazines Table of Illustrations Literature survey: Origins / history / theory of fashion photography advertising in high-end magazines Recent Developments of Fashion Photography Advertising Case Studies .10 Appendix of Illustrations. Table of Illustrations Helmut Newton, "Rue Aubriot," Vogue France. Paris 1975…

Pages: 14  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 10


Sponsorship Proposal

Pana Fete the Red Carpet Lookbook for Africa About Pana Fete is an annual fundraising gala in New York City. Hailed as the premier red carpet lookbook for Africa's most acclaimed fashion designers, Pana Fete features an exclusive list of designers showcasing a wide range of spectacular dresses and gowns, from traditional African styles to the most daring looks in modern African fashion. Each year the presenters of Pana Fete display several thematic fashion exhibits, representing an exclusive list of leading African-born designers and contributors from the continent's worldwide diaspora. Pana Fete is the most highly anticipated gala event in the world of African fashion and design, and by actively fundraising for a selected charitable organization that focuses on promoting the African fashion industry, the organizers of Pana Fete work to ensure that future generations will appreciate and enjoy the fashion of Africa. Pana Fete 2013 Tentatively scheduled for Wednesday, July 17th, 2013 at the Museum of Modern Art, the Pana Fete will shine the spotlight on five featured designers from across Africa: Korto Momolu of Liberia, Peter Walden of Tanzania, Mahlet Afework of Ethiopia, and Vanessa Mukasa of Uganda. Each of these globally acclaimed designers represents a different aspect of Africa's fashion sensibilities, with Korto Momolu bringing the styles of Liberia to the hit television series Project Runway, and contributing to her homeland through her charitable organization Gracie's Gift. The Tanzanian-born Peter Walden will be showcasing his signature brand of men's suits, Perfect Gentleman by PSW, and Ethiopia's Mahlet Afework will offer glimpses into the new line from Mafi, the fashion brand she created at the age of 18 to modernize the beauty of her native land's traditional garments. The visual presentation and fashion exhibition explores African fashion and offers guests an opportunity to meet with designers and view garments up-close. Proceeds from the event will benefit United Colors of Fashion (UCOF), a New York City-based non-profit 501 (c)(3) organization with a mission to educate and mentor under resourced youth about the fashion industry through hands-on training.……

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East Meets West: Oriental Influence on Western

East Meets West: Oriental Influence on Western Fashion Clothing is rarely recognized as a political force, yet fashion and design may be one of the most internationally regarded forms of trade, communication, and influence among countries worldwide. Perhaps more than any other form of shared knowledge, fashion permeates the boundaries of nations to influence the styles of people everywhere. According…

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Make Up

¶ … Status of the Global Cosmetics Industry Throughout history, men and women have sought to improve their appearance through the use of various lotions, creams and other preparations that typically fall under the umbrella terms make-up and cosmetics today. Beginning around the mid-19th century, the cosmetics industry gained momentum and has since become a multi-billion dollar global enterprise. The…

Pages: 16  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 9


Working Methods of Vivienne Westwood

¶ … Vivienne Westwood In the ever evolving world of high fashion, a designer being lauded as "ahead of their time" is a refrain heard all too often, but in the case of British design icon Vivienne Westwood, such high praise is a fitting tribute. Since the early 1970's it was Westwood who led the charge to infuse modern fashion with a true sense of modernity, as her passionate advocacy for the so-called "punk" movement spearheaded a sea change in the previously cloistered and refined world of haute couture. Together with rocker husband Malcolm McClaren -- who managed the Sex Pistols and designed for the New York Dolls -- Westwood brought the punk aesthetic to the forefront of British youth consciousness during the 1970's, helping to revolutionize an entire generation's sense of style by synthesizing the rebellious music with clothing and accessories. As noted by a recent exhibit of Westwood's work compiled by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, "the punk look has come to be associated with clothing that has been destroyed, has been put back together, is inside out, is unfinished, or is deteriorating & #8230; (and) punk was an early manifestation of deconstructionist fashion, which is an important component of late twentieth-century postmodern style."1 Westwood continually achieved her creative objectives over the span of several decades, transitioning from her punk rock heyday to become a guiding force for modern fashion like television's Sex and the City, which is why the following explication of her processes and methods is a crucial exercise for contemporary design students. 1.) Shannon Price. Vivienne Westwood (born 1941) and the Postmodern Legacy of Punk Style." In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art. (2000). In the decade between 1971 and 1981 Westwood and McClaren owned and operated a clothing store at 430 King's Road that, while attached to various names over the years, became legendary within the world of fashion because of Westwood's innovative and daring……

Pages: 2  |  Research Paper  |  Style: Chicago  |  Sources: 4


Developing a Marketing Mix for My Brand

Marketing Plan- Julia Grant Marketing Plan: Julia Grant, Freelance Fashion Stylist / Consultant Business Overview In the 2008 industry outlook report for the designer fashion market in Australia, revenue from the retail clothing industry will grow 16.3% until 2013, with an annual growth rate of 3.1%. Further, the report identified Australian states wherein key markets can be tapped: (1) New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland- majority of apparel sales (2) Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Perth- high fashionable boutiques (3) Melbourne- mass market retail, like Myer, Coles (owner of Target and Kmart) (4) Sydney- headquarters for David Jones, buying centre for tourists, duty free outlets (5) Queensland- designer fashion, resort, swimwear, and leisurewear In addition to growth in these markets, the emergence of Internet technologies made it possible for fashion designers to market their creations through online retailing (or e-tailing). Fashion e-tailers have expanded the Australian designer fashion market towards a more global scope, encompassing Asian and even North American and European markets. These growth areas in the Australian designer fashion market provide new opportunities for up-and-coming creative fashion designers to further enhance the growth of the industry through these identified markets. This business environment is especially favorable for freelance fashion stylists/designers, whose innovative designs and global approach to marketing allow them to market their services and clothing line to a broader audience. Because of the broad scope of marketing involved in e-tailing, fashion stylists / designers further reinforce their style identities to further differentiate themselves from a the highly competitive designer fashion industry, both in Australia and worldwide. II. Brand Profile Julia Grant is the foundation of JG Creative direction. As a freelance fashion stylist / consultant, JG specializes in high-end conceptual-based editorial of art and fashion magazines, including advertising for selective champagnes and special projects focusing on runway, music and film styling. Working for both Australian and international brands, JG creates a Unique Aesthetic Experience, expressing Artisanship and Creative Integrity, the driving forces behind all JG projects. Highly influenced by fashion history, music, art and film, JG considers styling as a medium of choice where Optimistic and Innovative Ideas can be expressed. JG's brand philosophy: The identity of JG Creative Direction is imagery. She is Strong, Independent with a sense of Mystery and Intrigue. She has her feet on the ground and her head in the clouds; at times unpredictable, but always in control. Living to inspire, reflecting the…

Pages: 4  |  Marketing Plan  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


Fashion Designer Monique Lhuillier Fashion Designer Monique

Fashion Designer Monique Lhuillier Fashion Designer Monique Lhuillier History of Monique Lhuillier's Life In a scant 12 years, Monique Lhuillier has risen from her roots in a third-world country to becoming the hottest fashion designer. Lhuillier was profiled in legendary Newsweek magazine within eight years of her not-quite-humble start in the fashion industry, garnering a coveted "second cover" status to…

Pages: 6  |  Research Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 3


Influential Fashion Designer of Today

Influential Fashion Designer of Today Calvin Richard Klein was born on November 19, 1942, in the Bronx, New York. From 1959-1962 he attended the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) in New York ("Calvin Richard Klein"). At FIT, the classes were "tedious" and the curriculum "pedantically oriented to learning a trade" (Gaines and Churcher 41). Klein was bored, but he used the time and exposure to styles FIT provided to discover his own tastes of what is good and what is not. He found loved natural fabrics and hated synthetic ones. Bright colors turned him off; he preferred quieter shades of brown and beige. During this time the youthful, modern sportswear of French designer Jacques Tiffeau influenced Klein's evolving outlook, as did the stylist practicality of American designer Claire McCarell. The student Klein spent a lot of time at studying the worldwide collection of garments held at the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (Gaines and Churcher 41-42). In 1962, Klein entered the fashion industry as a sketcher for Dan Millstein, a superstar of fashion of those times who had designed the dress Marilyn Monroe wore to her wedding to Joe DiMaggio. Klein found the experience challenging, frustrating, but valuable. People described Millstein as a tyrant, and working for him was difficult. Having Klein work on the "missy" line, he didn't fully utilize the young man's talents. Klein really wanted to please Millstein but never felt fully appreciated. Nonetheless, he benefited from working with Millstein, including going to Paris where his official role was to memorize and later sketch to the smallest detail the pieces his boss liked. When possible, Klein explored Paris on his own and absorbed the fashion of the street which he liked more than what he saw on the runway (Gaines and Churcher 48-54). Klein quit working for Millstein and took a job with Halldon Ltd., a company that manufactured fake fur coats. That kind of product didn't really interest Klein, but the work environment at Halldon was more pleasant and more supportive than at Millstein's company, and there Klein first began to make a name for himself in the industry (Gaines and Churcher 65-66). Klein and another former Millstein designer, Abe Morenstein, began working together as independent designers. While Klein was getting a lot of attention and job offers,……

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Fashion Designer Self-Promotion My Name Is John

Fashion Designer Self-Promotion My name is John Smith. There are many factors that have motivated me to become a fashion designer and that are now beckoning me to apply my talents in the introduction of an exciting new brand in the fashion industry. I was born in Osaka, Japan in 1979. I believe that inherited my creative bent and interest in fashion from my parents; my father is a photographer and my mother is a tailor. As a child, one of my favorite pastimes was making detailed sketches of lots of plants and animals. I first became interested in fashion as a teen when I began to admire the fashion collections from the United States and Europe. I entered the Mode Design School in Tokyo when I was 18 years old where I focused on my keen interest in patterning. My dedication and focus led me to graduate with honors. After graduation, I began working as a freelance costume designer, but found this too limiting. So, in 2004, I moved to New York to broaden my horizons. Shortly after moving to New York, I started my own brand which was tremendously successfully. A major fashion buyer bought my collection and sold it to major shops in New York and Tokyo. After this, I returned to designing costumes and, in 2006, I won in the avant-garde section of the Gen Art International Design competition (http://www.genart.org/fashion.htm).This award was very important because Gen Art is noted for its discovery of new talent and is considered to be an important gateway to success. For instance, this organization has produced talents such as Zac Posn, Rebecca Taylor and Philip Lim, to name just a few of the emerging talents Gen Art has scouted. In 2007, I won yet another Gen Art award, this time in the Men's section. I am now working as a main pattern maker for Jen Kao, an up-and-upcoming New York-based fashion brand that is heavily rumored to become the next Philip Lim or Alexander Wang. I am also the designer of my own brand called 'a degree'. My brand 'a degree', pronounced as 'aid' in Japanese, represents a very unique conceptual design. I chose this name because it stands for a dimension or point-of-view which I believe will appeal to consumers who are seeking fashion that denotes their own personalities and lifestyles. The cloth I will use is three dimensional and…

Pages: 3  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Fashion and Identity

For example, women who dress in the style of Audrey Hepburn (circa Breakfast at Tiffany's) are not just communicating their love of little black dresses, but are also expressing an even deeper desire to have a "fly by night" lifestyle of the socialite Holly Golightly in the most carefree and irreverent manner. As this paper has demonstrated, clothes and fashion don't just allow one a certain level of social distinction with which to connect their identity, they are also used as a means of asserting one's inclusion or popularity within a given social group. "To follow a fashion is to imitate the norm so that outsiders (such as those wearing sundresses) feel uncomfortable while the outsiders enjoy the feeling of inclusion" (Dant, 1999: 87). Thus, fashion becomes another way of expressing one's right to socialize with a certain group of people, or one's right to receive a certain level of treatment. Fashion thus allows one to assert one's identity as either cool or popular or "with it" and hip. These are all ways which are modes of expressing value on oneself, much like the hip hop artists who cover themselves in luxury items and bling. Fashion and the connection with identity can also manifest as a means of demonstrating one's differentness. Thus, in this manner, one dresses differently than the norm as a means of expressing one's own uniqueness; once the masses start to copy this particular mode of style, the fashion no longer becomes fashionable and desirable (Entwistle, 2000). Thus, fashion in terms of identity can be expressed with this level of duality: it can at once be used as a means of inclusion to a desirable social group: this is often when fashion is used in connection to class, something which is nearly inescapable in terms of fashion (Kaiser, 2014). Alternatively, it can also be used as a means for differentiating oneself from others as more important or more desirable, stamping oneself with the mark of the extraordinary. Thus, this paper has sought to demonstrate the very hard and fast connection between fashion and one's personal identity. Essentially, fashion is a very strong means of expressing one's personal identity, along with a projection of where one is from and one's cultural background. Like all things, these aspects can be adjusted and tweaked to demonstrate the aspect of the self that one wishes to set forth over others. Fashion…

Pages: 6  |  Essay  |  Style: Harvard  |  Sources: 8


Fashion, Lifestyle, and Consumption and Their Influence on Identities

This is because they present the values of the traditional societies and have an inherent meaning of the society. Fashion designers often pick on these traditional values and dressing and put them into a piece of attire that creates the national identity. Scholars have argued that the contribution of the different cultures of a country into the national identity created in fashion is important in the acceptance of the garments overall. By excluding other communities or groups, the fashion designer will be taking a position about the national identity that often negatively affects the acceptance. However, there is need to balance the societies, communities or groups because including too many will bring a conflict in the fashion attire. One solution to this is the African print that is often associated with African nations. This is a print or fabric that is made from tie and dye and is unique to African communities. While western fashion designers have obviously made some of these, these are still symbolic of African heritage and represent a form of national identity for the African continent Wurst, 2005() The Maasai of East Africa also have traditional fabrics that are unique to their community. These are often the national identity of the East African countries and have been the source of inspiration for designers such as Louis Vuitton, John Paul Gaultier, and Yves Saint Laurent. These designers have created collections inspired by the East African maasai community collection. Anyone seeing these designs can easily attribute them to East African communities Wipper, 1972() The presence of a national identity is based on the argument that communities in one nation have attributes which they share and which are distinct to them. This is seen in the maasai community whose fabric and attire is representative of the community's culture, language, religion, history, customs, rituals, territory, and ceremonies. These present the elements that evoke the presence of a national identity. However, the national identity has often changed with time as the culture, territory, and rituals of these communities evolve. Conclusion Fashion is used as a tool to portray the identity of an individual. It portrays the emotional, physical, psychological, and social aspect of the individual through expressing their mood and feelings. Fashion is also used to portray a national identity that drives the unique values of the country. The use of fashion as a tool to portray identity is more proliferated…

Pages: 7  |  Essay  |  Style: Harvard  |  Sources: 8


Beauty Industry

Karolina is the stereotypical image of the normal woman who is convinced to buy more beauty products than she needs, and for that reason I relate to her more. I am personally not willing to do something as drastic as surgery, like Eva, but I do find myself spending more than I should on certain beauty products in order to avoid things like signs of early aging or vanishing pores. I relate to this character most because I have found myself in her position before, although not to that extreme. It is only natural to want to believe that the next best beauty remedy holds the secret to staying younger longer and that every woman should start using it in her regiment as early as possible in order to stay young and fresh as long as possible. Clearly, the film takes a direct stand in how manipulative the media and celebrity endorsement of products can be on public opinion. Especially in a field such as beauty, where so many women are already insecure, the media comes to exploit these insecurities to the financial advantage of major cosmetic companies and the industry as a whole. The media is responsible for all of the hype involved in the beauty industry. It perpetuates average woman's fears in a way that makes them feel ashamed of them. Obviously, there is a lot of money to made in the industry. For example, the film says that $1,927,000,000 was spent on diet products. This is a huge industry. When a sign of weakness is found, the media really exploits it in a way that keeps its investors and sponsors in the industry paid. Celebrities just become another marketing tool that allows the media and its sponsors to tap into the minds of the every day consumer. So much attention is paid to the beauty of celebrities. When one particularly loved celebrity endorses a product, that product can often sell like wildfire because people assume that is the reason that celebrity looks so amazing all of the time. In reality, that celebrity has a full team of full time make up artists, hair stylists, and so on, to make them look flawless at every available moment. The product alone does nothing to increase the beauty or mystery associated with celebrities and their image. It is the financial head sof the beauty industry that use celebrities to exploit…

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Gender and the Fashion Industry: Blaming Gay

Gender and the Fashion Industry: Blaming Gay Men for the Emaciation of Women One of the most recent controversies particular to the fashion industry that has spilled over into the larger media conversation about female beauty is the shrinking BMI (Body Mass Index) of fashion models. Some major fashion shows, most notably the 2006 show in Spain, have attempted to…

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 4


Kimono History and Contemporary Fashion Design Influence

Kimono History And Contempory Fashion Design Influence The kimono has become one of the most notable and recognizable elements of Japanese culture. If we were to name characteristics of Japanese civilization, the kimono would most certainly be amongst them. Although nowadays Japanese dress almost uniformly in Western style, the kimono has remained not only a tradition, but a way of…

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: Chicago  |  Sources: 5


Oscar De La Renta

Oscar de la Renta is one of the most successful and long-lived designers in the fashion industry. He was born on July 22, 1932 in the Dominican Republic, and at a young age took to painting. The masters Cristobal Balenciaga and Antonio Castillo trained him at age 18 in Spain. He first rose to fame during the 1960s; when First…

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Fashion Designers Who Have Made

Early style inspiration came from childhood trips abroad to Asia, Africa, India and the Caribbean, as well as from her parents. When Marant became dissatisfied with the selection of clothes in stores she decided to start making her own clothes. These early creations were made out of discarded material and soon many of her friends wanted her to make clothes…

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Africa Fashion Week NY

So here we go. Adiat Disu is the founder, chief communications officer at Adiree PR & Communications, and the director of Africa Fashion Week. Most importantly, Adiat is a tireless ambassador -- the wind beneath the wings -- of African fashion entrepreneurs, and she is always focused on positioning entrepreneurs for success and contributing to economic growth in Africa through fashion. The synergy between Adiat's business acumen and passion for fashion has been widely recognized. She shared the stage with Diane van Furstenberg when speaking to African Women Delegates at the United Nations, during the African Women Entrepreneurship Program. Following Hillary Clinton's keynote address, Adiat spoke about the challenges and opportunities of competing globally to African Small and Medium Sized Enterprises in Washington D.C. Adiat's trajectory from the diaspora to one of New York City's movers and shakers in fashion has covered in mainstream media by CNN, Forbes magazine, the L.A. Times, and the Washington Post, and by Arise TV and Black Enterprise. Prepare to be awed by Adiat's incredible story and her commitment to changing consumer thoughts and behavior towards Africa. Award-winning David Tlale will focus the Celebrity Spotlight on design and the launching of a brand. In 2003, David won the Elle New Talent in South Africa contest, and after collecting many industry awards, he is back as a judge for Elle. David has been named Best Designer by the Sunday Times in South Africa, appointed "Head Designer for Carducci Woman" under the House of Monatic Group in Cape Town South Africa, and was selected as one of only four young South African fashion designers to present their collection during Paris Couture week. David was voted Most Stylish Designer at the South African Style Awards, voted Mzansi's South Africa's Star Designer of the year, and nominated for the Mercedes-Benzes Fashion and Art Awards. Clearly, David Tiale is recognized as a global design force, and his conversations with us will be as unforgettable as his long list of nominations and accolades. A.O. Solomon will speak about faith, inspiration, and motivation. As the founder of Shadow of the Almighty Ministries, Solomon is a spiritual guide to thousands, with a ministry that has grown into ten branches across the United States, and a prayer-line with a worldwide presence, that ministers to more than seven thousand participants daily. Solomon was born and raised in Nigeria, where he grew up in a Muslim…

Pages: 3  |  Creative Writing  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Fashion Designers in Turkey

Fashion Designers in Turkey Emerging Fashion Designers in Turkey Fashion is a good indicator of the social and political trends characterizing society at a given point in time. It is safe to say that fashion represents a very powerful means of communication. Just as it can be influenced by people, it is in the same manner that it can influence…

Pages: 8  |  Thesis  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


Fashion Entrepreneurship

¶ … fashion entrepreneurship is all about and why I am fitting for the course. Fashion entrepreneurship consists of initiating a fashion enterprise, venture, or idea, and assuming accountability and responsibly for the outcome and risks. To me, such a job indicates a courageous, responsible, and hardworking individual, and, I believe, that my resume will prove to you that I…

Pages: 5  |  Application Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


Fashion Merchandising Fashion Group International

This page provides help to the student in the practical aspects of completing one's education in fashion merchandising and finding a job after graduation. For both students and industry professionals, there is a great deal of information available even without membership. On the "Calendar of Events" page, one can find information about different events as well as access press coverage of past events and designer interviews. The "Editorials" page has links to articles by several regular columnists who write about industry trends. The "Press" link was being updated at the time this paper was written, so no further information was available. The "Sponsors" link shows designers and companies that contributed to the creation of the 2010 directory. Each entity on the list is linked to his/her/its own home page. Contributors to the current directory include such diverse people and organizations such as Thierry Mugler, Avon, the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Merchandise Mart Properties, and Saks Fifth Avenue, among others. One has the option on the site for registering with Twitter and Facebook. By linking with Twitter, one can receive short messages and stay up-to-date on current events in fashion. There is also the capability for voting in various surveys (the current one is for the FGI Rising Star Finalists). One can sign up for special events and contests as well. By becoming a friend of FGI on Facebook, one can connect read news updates and connect with other FGI members. FGI's website is useful both to students of fashion merchandising and professionals in the industry. It is an easy-to-navigate site that provides current information on trends and events. Fashion is an industry in which it is important to be attuned to the latest trends and happenings. It is important to be up to the minute. FGI's website is a good resource with which to do that. Works Cited Fashion Group International, The. 2011. Web. 8 Jan.……

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Fashion, Appearance, and Social Identities "Tyranny of

Fashion, Appearance, And Social Identities "Tyranny of the Ideal Image of Beauty": How Are Fashion and Appearance Central to the Construction of Social Identities Most western societies today are highly commercialized and capitalist where not only traditional commercial products are for sale, but also appearances, looks, fashion, and images. These nonmaterial products are sold to consumers through various means. Mass…

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Fashion and Technology

Fashion and Technology What kind of technology-driven fashion will your grandchildren's grandchildren be walking around wearing? Will your family's future offspring of the female persuasion be wearing spray-on dresses featuring unlimited style color coordinating options in the year 2030? Will her best friends have cellphone bracelets and will their boyfriends sport fashionable eyewear that also serve as live video monitors…

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Fashion and Appearance Central to the Construction

¶ … FASHION and APPEARANCE CENTRAL to the CONSTRUCTION of SOCIAL IDENTITIES? The objective of this work is to answer the question of how is fashion and appearance central to the construction of social identities and to present a discussion that includes reference to specific examples. The literature examined in this study clearly indicates that fashion and appearance are central to the construction of social identities. For example, the work of Christopher Breward (1999) entitled; "The Hidden Consumer: Masculinities, Fashion and City Life in 1860-1914" states that the study of "...masculinities, fashion and urban culture is rarely addressed in the same work since the dominant wisdom has long held that consumption was a feminine enterprise and that pre-War British and American men were reluctant consumers at best." (Breward, 1999) It is the belief of Breward the male clothing and fashion in the late-Victorian era effectively "provided a creative space for masculine contestation and innovation and that male fashion consumptions positioned consuming men at the forefront of the modernization process that Britain was undergoing at the dawn of the twentieth century. Breward's work first conducts an examination of "the color, cut and texture of clothing available to middle-class and aristocratic consumers" with a focus on the demonstration of the "elaboration and elegant of pre-Victorian male beauty survived the austerity of Victorian moral rhetoric." (Breward, 1999) the remaining evidence of male fashion existing in "...popular novels, shop catalogues, trade directories, diaries and photographs are examined in Breward's work. The graphical reproduction of the retail fashion plates and advertisement "demonstrate the wide variety of elegant clothing and fashion accessories available to Victorian men, and his examination of how men's clothing was discussed in popular novels, men's periodicals and diaries" indicates how prominent fashionable looks was in the mind of the Victorian Englishmen. I. SOCIAL AGENDA of FASHION - a DEPENDENT NATURE The work of Diana Crane entitled: "Fashion and Its Social Agendas" states that fashionable clothes are used to make statements about social class and social identity, but their principal messages are about the ways in which women and men perceive their gender roles or are expected to perceive them." (Crane, 2001) Crane states that fashionable clothes in the nineteenth century "generally expressed the gender roles of upper-class women." (2001) the class structures had a differential effect on women in the nineteenth century in that fashion "had elements of social control..." exemplifying 'the…

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Fashion Ready to Wear Surprisingly, Ready-Made or

Fashion Ready to Wear Surprisingly, ready-made or ready-to-wear clothing stems back to the Civil War, although such designs were in short supply at that time. The growth of manufacturing production, the advertising industry, urban professionals, and chain stores and mail order catalogs that allowed countrywide availability enhanced the development of ready-made apparel. Throughout the 20th century, many international haute couture designers, such as Elsa Schiaparelli, Pierre Balmain, Geoffrey Beene and Kishore Biyani began transposing their fashions for the ready-to-wear market and created an industry of mass merchandising. Ready-to-wear collections are not custom made and are standard sized, which makes them more suitable for larger productions. Ready-to- wear collections consist of a normally represent a certain theme or perspective and to make a fashion statement. They are branded and sold in stores for the mass public marketplace. One of the first designers following this mode was Elsa Schiaparelli. Born in Rome Italy in 1890, she studied philosophy and then moved to the United States and worked as a film scriptwriter. In 1920, Schiaparelli went to Paris and designed and wore a black sweater knitted with a white bow. An American store saw this design and asked for an order, and her ready-to-wear business took off with hundreds of knitters producing the fashions. Schiaparelli's designs were innovative and very popular with their use of bright colors, often pink, and her imaginative use of conventional fabrics, zippers and very unusual hats and shoes. Many of her notable designs were based on the inspirations of her friends, who included Christian Berard, Jean Cocteau, and Salvador Dal', such as a summer dress with lobsters. She brought attention to detail in all her ready-to-wear collections and comical additions, such as embroidered add-ons, odd buttons and complex zipper patterns. She was one of the first women designers to license out her name, so it could be associated with mass produced clothing, such as hats, nylons, perfumes and tartans (Who's Who in the Twentieth Century 1999). Fashion designer Pierre Balmain, was born in St. Jean de Maurienne, Savoie, France, in 1914. After receiving his degree in architecture, he freelanced as an illustrator and assistant designer and was trained, as was Christian Dior, by two of the most well-known designers of the time, Molyneux and Lucien Lelong. He opened his own haute couture house right after the end of World War II in Paris and remained its director until…

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Fashion Knockoffs

Business Fashion Knockoffs: Perils and Prevention in a Global Industry What's in a name? Quite a lot, if it is the name of an author, artist, musician, or inventor. A wide range of artistic creations and commercial products sell much better if they are produced by talented and recognized individuals. Creative minds spend weeks, months, even years, coming up with…

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Men's Fashion in His Book

The history of men's fashion outlined above demonstrates how Flugel's theory of the Great Masculine Renunciation fails to accurately describe the changing standards for men in the nineteenth and twentieth century, but it does not explain why this change occurred, or how men might have benefited from a standard of dress that made them "hot, uncomfortable, tired, and bad-tempered" (Bourke…

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Price Beauty? 'For Though Beauty

These ideas provide an excellent overview of that Age's understanding of the subject. In the second edition of his Enquiry (1759), Burke addressed the idea of Beauty, by which he meant "that quality or those qualities in bodies by which they cause love, or some passion similar to it." Burke's goal of identifying the physiological relationship between external objects and…

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Fashion and Technology Exhibition Assignment the Fashion

Fashion and Technology Exhibition Exhibition Assignment The fashion and technology exhibition at fit museum Since conception, technology has grown tremendously. It has continued to influence every sector of the world, business, education, security and the others. Art and fashion are not an exception either. The involvement of technology in the industry is notably evident in the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT). The museum at the institute has been in existence since 1969. It was moved to the present building in the early 1974, and it started operations of presentations in 1975. It is an accredited institution dealing in the lucrative business of fashion, having won several awards from the innovative exhibitions such as The London Fashion, The Corset Fashioning the Body and several other shows. The commercial collections consist of thousands of permanent collections of garments. The policy the museum uses to collect the garments is focused on the aesthetic and historical significance of the clothing, accessories, visual materials and textiles. The museum at fit boasts of quality and authentic collections. Moreover, since it moved to the current building, the museum has continued to grow and expand gradually. This has created the need for renovations and further expansion. The museum, which consists of three gallery exhibitions, is quite well designed. However, the setting of the space in the main floor of the museum needs to be revisited. The space is not well used. There are a lot of misplacements, resulting in inadequate space from the entrance to the exit. This is as a result of the many artifacts that the museum offers. In addition, the space at the entrance is crowded with welcoming displays that contribute to the crowding. The inside display sections are also not well arranged, leading to wastage of space. The museum is quite famous, with many visitors frequenting the place every day. As one enters the museum, he or she is greeted by a mixture of feelings creating a mood that is quite complicated to describe. Every person who enters the place for the first time usually is excited by the quality of collections hence is in an excited mood. However, as the person gets into the museum, the moody turns gloomy. The museum setting and the use of the space creates confusion as the there is no clear setting of the direction to take. The moody and mixed feeling experiences are brought mainly by the…

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Adama Paris Adama Ndiaye Is the Designer

Adama Paris Adama Ndiaye is the designer who is responsible for launching and running the brand, Adama Paris. Adama is Senegalese by origin. Her association with Zaire Kinshassa is reflected in her work as she has been able to integrate multiculturalism and a number of different techniques in her dress designing. Her unique work is rather appreciated and most of the times, she is recognized as the multicultural dress designer of the new millennium. Her childhood was spent in a number of international cities and multi-ethnic societies and due to her experience of living in different cultures and among people with different modes of fashion, she has been able to materialize those cultures in her versatile dresses. Her brand embodies urban fashion as a great influencer as she has lived in several cities during her course of life including Los Angeles and Paris. It would not be incorrect to state that it is not just a way of dressing that Adama Paris reflects. It also is a mirror to the essence and character of the woman states in the modern times. At Adama Paris, the other cultures (African, in particular) are open to every single woman who simply turns down submission to a reductive image that is mostly typified by a single culture or brand. In her own words, the designer reveals that "Adama Paris was born from my desire to share my passion for fashion as well as fulfilling my will for displaying diversity" (as qtd. In Meisel, 2011). It is also important to mention here that a number of fashion events have been founded and produced by the mentioned designer. These events include Afrika Fashion Awards (popularly known as Trophies of the African Fashion), Black Fashion Week and Dakar Fashion Week. Kibonen NY In early years, Kibonen Nfi worked as a co-designer and dress stylist for the inventive and pioneering clothing line KiRette Couture. However, in the modern present times in which the fashion has become an integral part of almost every contemporary society, Kibonen has rose above and established the brand as a force that has challenged every other clothing line in the world of fashion. Kibonen has been successful in introducing fashion that is inherent to New York as Kibonen New York and chose the place as it is the recognized as the fashion capital in the world. Kibonen New York is now renowned for creating…

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Designer Story

Designer Story Now the Whole Team Here: How David Tlale Started from the Bottom and Worked His Way to the Runways The Future Accountant David Tlale thought he would become an accountant, specializing in internal auditing. It was something he just happened to be good at, never mind the lack of passion. He hadn't yet found anything that turned him on, so he did what came naturally to him. That was, until his life changed. At Tshwane University, David started hanging out with what he calls the "crazy fashion students." Their suitcases full of sketches and fabrics intrigued him, and David wanted to learn more. The more he learned, the more he knew that fashion was his life's passion and purpose. Fashion, not accounting, was going to be David's future career. Changing Courses The shift from accounting to fashion design did not flow well for David. He transferred from Tshwane to Vaal University, entering a four-year fashion design program. His first year, he was just an average student. Yet year by year he improved, putting tremendous pressure on himself to achieve the highest status of being named best student based on an annual fashion show. This inner drive and determination is what propelled David Tlale into the big leagues. Those Who Can't Do, Teach David had the opportunity to earn both money and experience teaching basic design at Vaal. The teaching gig started first when one of the lecturers took maternity leave. From there, David remained an instructor for nearly five years before he realized he was starting to fall into a rut. He wanted to design, not teach. In 2003, he quit teaching with hardly any savings. With an ambition to build a brand, David left home and started to do it: he started to make dresses for money. He designed anything……

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Fashion "Eco-Fashion" Is a Term

She advocates taking good care of one's clothes to prolong the life of items. This includes wearing delicate and professional clothing on appropriate occasions and not, for example, working out in the yard. Washing in cold water and hanging clothing out to dry is good for the life of the clothes and for the environment. As has been shown, eco-fashion is not a movement that takes us back to past centuries, where individuals were almost wholly in charge of the garment-making process, from raising wool to spinning threads to weaving their own garments. Although technology is modern and seemingly the antithesis to the natural movement, it is actually technology that will facilitate cleaner manufacturing and processing. Technology is a driving force behind eco-fashion, as well as smarter consumer habits. It is hoped that eco-fashion will eventually replace traditional fashion by bringing together all the players -- designers, manufacturers, scientists, retailers, and consumers (Scaturro, 2008, p. 488). "Green" apparel and accessories presently constitute just two percent of the $200 billion a year fashion industry in the U.S. according to Marshal Cohen, chief analyst of market research firm NPD Group. Ten years ago, the market for eco-fashion comprised less than half a percent of industry business, so progress has been made (El Nasser, 2013). Eco-fashion is good for the planet and plays an important role in its sustainability. References "Detox fashion." (2013). Greenpeace Update. Spring 2013, 14-15. El Nasser, H. (2013). What's in style: Eco-friendly, green fashion. USA Today. Retrieved from http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2013/04/28/the-rise-of-green- fashion/1996773/ Phelan, H. (2012). Eco-friendly fashion brands we can get behind. Fashionista. Retrieved from http://fashionista.com/2012/04/10-eco-friendly-fashion-brands-we-can-get-behind/ Rodie, J.B. (2012). A swimming poolful at a time. Textile World 162(6), 22-24. Scaturro, S. (2008). Eco-tech fashion: Rationalizing technology in sustainable fashion. Fashion Theory: The Journal of Dress, Body & Culture 12(4), 469-488. Somers, D. (2013). Green your closet: 5 tips for eco-friendly fashion. Greener Ideal. Retrieved from http://www.greenerideal.com/lifestyle/0506-green-your-closet-5-tips-for-eco- friendly-fashion/ Taran, M., Bagheri, S., and Bakhtiyari, S. (2012). Eco-friendly poly (3-hydroxybutyrate) synthesis from textile wastewater and its……

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Fashion / Ugo at the Age of

Fashion / Ugo At the age of thirteen, celebrity stylist Ugo Mozie already had unique ideas for putting the fun in fashion. He took unlikely pairings, such as his sister's latex tights and a button-down shirt, and added his own twist, drawing on influences from such far-flung locales as London, Africa, and Los Angeles. As a high school sophomore in 2009, he and his best friend set the garment industry abuzz by debuting their collection during New York's Fashion Week. Ugo had a short stint as a model but following an internship in the marketing department at Capitol Records, Ugo knew that the business side of fashion, and a career as a stylist, were his future. The fashion part of the stylist's job is easy, Ugo insists. Without business savvy and the ability to manage every detail in the process, a would-be fashion stylist is not going to make it. Ugo believes it is his male vantage point that makes him successful with his female clients. He believes it's all about the relationship with a client and making her feel comfortable and confident in a look designed just for her. Women want to look good for men, and they trust that Ugo will help them do just that. As with the "street chic" line of clothing Ugo plans to launch with Chris Brown, Ugo strives to make his celebrity clients look timeless, yet special. Ugo put Dawn Richard in a Zac Posen mermaid dress for the cover art of her album. Ugo chose timeless black for a classically cut mermaid address. The ensemble shows a softer side of the hard-rocking Richard that audiences do not usually get to see. it's the element of surprise that makes this elegant look a winner. Dawn Richard worked with Ugo again for a photography by Sarah McClogan for Vibe magazine. Again, Ugo went for a classic look, putting Ugo in a black gown with an intricate bodice and chiffon overskirt. The photo captures Richard in motion. With her sleekly styled hair, the focus is on the movement of her skirt, which billows in shiny folds around her. The photo is elegant, but it also captures Richard's beauty, style and energy. Shot for magazine in New York, "Jewel," by Lisa has a bohemian flair. Paired with a bright yellow bag and yellow bangle bracelet, the model is photographed on a busy New York City street.…

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Fashion Future What Is Your

By establishing a consistent social media presence on the web, even a small house can generate buzz and convey the unique benefits of function and style created by the product. As a newcomer in the fashion world, I see myself becoming more technologically savvy over the next five years, and using a variety of social media to reach different segments of the market. The approach will be more directed to the consumer, versus through traditional magazines. Relationships with retail portal sites that drive excitement with deals like Gilt will also become more important. "The internet has a noise and discovery problem," leading to consumers tending to linger at the same 'boring old sites' unless websites that showcase new and innovative companies and designers force web-surfers out of their comfort zone (Chen 2012). If an online consumer sees an interesting link on Pinterest or reads about a new product showcased on a blogger's website, he or she is more likely to expand his or her horizons. Getting to consumers and encouraging consumers to 'share' their purchases and preferences will be a vital part of the direction of mainstream fashion and how it is evolving. While celebrities will still be important in terms of setting style trends, ordinary consumers will have more of a hand in how trends evolve, and fashion industry insiders must reach out to them to cultivate relationships. I seek to bring this innovative approach to the new world of fashion. With hard work and a willingness to make sacrifices -- perhaps by beginning in a lower-paid internship to 'learn the ropes' and seeking to educate myself in my free time to the potential uses of technology in fashion merchandizing and design -- I hope to become a part of the fashion world of tomorrow. Works Cited Chen, Leo. "Social commerce, Pinterest, and the future of fashion retail." Tech Crunch. 16 Jun 2012. [19 Jun 2012]……

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Givenchy Count Hubert James Marcel

His association with Hepburn would go on for the rest of her life. He not only designed the wardrobe for her films, among them How to Steal a Million, and her iconic turn in Breakfast at Tiffany's which turned the little black dress into the closet must-have of every woman in the world, but much of her personal wardrobe as well. The outfits in Sabrina would be iconographic of the kinds of fashions Givenchy specialized in. When he started out, he could not always work in the most lush fabrics but the way he utilized his materials made even the least expensive seem luxurious and fascinating. Givenchy become famous for innovation. He specialized in new ideas and techniques that though not as envelope-pushing as some of the designers of his era and the following decades, would lead historians of fashion to associate his name with amazing designs and a gorgeous sense of style. Today, Givenchy is still creating beautiful women's wear and attractive men's wear. Currently in charge of the women's line is Riccardo Tisci who is known for gothic touches and space-age minimalism. The Givenchy brand has now been in existence for nearly sixty years. It still speaks of class and simplicity. Those who wear Givenchy walk in the footsteps of Hepburn and those who design for Givenchy walk in the shadow of a true artist. Works Cited Givenchy.……

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