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Standards of Care/Mental Health/Cultural Competence

Patients who utilize family interpreters or non-professional interpreters, for instance nurses, clerks, and technicians are the ones that would be less satisfied with their visitation (Furler, 2012). Potential Solutions Culturally competent assessment skills are vital to assist communication, to show reverence for cultural diversity, and to inquire culturally sensitive queries about practices and beliefs that need to be measured in…

Pages: 8  |  Essay  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 5


Community Organizing for Health

Oral Health: A Community Health Problem Oral remains a serious public health issue in the U.S., since it has significant effect on the overall health and well-being of people (Kaylor, Polivka, Chaudry, Salsberry, & Wee, 2011). Oral health has been a public health and government concern since the 1970s, with efforts geared towards the increment of the proportion of persons…

Pages: 7  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


Health History This Health History

The patient's fever, chills, fatigue, blood in urine and the bumps on his fingers and toes are all classic signs of endocarditis. Furthermore, this condition is essentially an inflammation of the lining of the heart chambers and valves: people who have artificial heart valves, inherited heart defects, implanted medical devices and comparable conditions are generally at risk for this condition.…

Pages: 5  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Healthcare Management Health Care Management

However, insurance companies feel exploited because much of their premiums, 85% is used in enhancing quality care (OECD, 2011). This provision can garner support because it promotes a healthier nation through provision of quality care, but it can as well be rejected by those in support of insurance companies. Conclusion The proposed health care reforms taking effect in 2011 addresses post -- acute and long-term care, and the insufficiency of financing, lack of care coordination, lack of community and home-based services and poor quality care. The reforms taking effect in 2011 function to enhance provision of affordable and accessible care for the seniors, disabled and children covered under Children Health Insurance Program. These reforms also provide preventive care for those enrolled under Medicare. However, the proposed reforms do not include other millions of people who remain uninsured and, as a result; I would redesign them to include all citizens in efforts of the facilitating provision of universal care. References Vlvar, L.(2011). Obama's health care reform 2010: From change to concession. New York: GRIN Verlag. Harrington, C.(2011). Health policy: Crisis and reform. Texas: Jones & Bartlett Publishers. Teitelbaum, J. (2013). Essentials of health policy and law. New York: Jones & Bartlett Publishers. Gray, V., & Benz, J. (2013). Interest groups and health care reform across the United States. Georgia:……

Pages: 4  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 6


Obama Care Plan Health Care

According to Congressional Budget Office the plan will help reduce deficit by a startling $138 million over ten years (Health Care Reform, 2012). Although the statistics are subject to debate but the new plan ensures that costs are not distributed evenly but the plan actually helps in curbing the overspending crisis currently present in this particular industry. By cutting on…

Pages: 10  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4


Consumer Driven Health Movement Impacted Health Care

¶ … consumer driven health movement impacted health care service delivery? The concept of 'consumer driven health care' emphasizes on allowing the health care consumers the authority to chose, regulate and be informed on the health care services. Regulation of the consumers will fetch the insurers to innovate for creating the higher quality, and lower cost services for demand. In this manner the consumer driven health movement is taken to be a revolution and visualized as a drastic change of the technocratic, authoritative policies not acceptable to consumers and providers. This enables the people to receive the health care they desire at a cost they are desirous of offering. The market driven solution in respect of health care depends entirely upon the influences on demand and supply, according to the wish of providers and customers. The managed care on contrary authorizes a third party, a technocrat to regulate all the actions that aims at reducing the payments to hospitals and doctors and dissuade the consumers to be away from the wasteful expensive specialists. (Herzlinger, 2004) However the assurances of the managed care to lead a better quality and cost control were not made available to consumers. Providers were also dejected with the managed care's hobbling of the profession. And to many of the professionals the consumer driven health care was to make them free from the shackles of managed care. The consumer driven health care will lower costs by making people to concentrate on needed health care, simultaneously improving quality and regulate costs not by rationing but by motivating productivity, increasing variations in health care, integrated record system, concentrated factories, and personalized medicine. The consumer driven health care necessitated at the employees have greater choice of highly differentiated health plans, control over how much they spend for various health care needs and information to assist their choices. (Herzlinger, 2004) The competition among newly differentiated products assists to regulate health care costs and direct selection by informed employees ensures that costs are moderated by improving quality and not by regulating the appropriate standards of care. In a consumer driven health care system, providers has ample liberty to bundle care in the manner they feel are suitable to name their own costs. Like in other consumer driven markets, excellent information will enable users to evaluate the quality of the providers. (Herzlinger, 2004) In order to combat the increasing prices of the healthcare…

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Community Health Nursing the Contribution

The community health nurse will have the responsibility of profiling the cases of the geographical region in terms of fatigue, anemia, and susceptibility to respiratory infections. Conclusion This study reaffirms the connection between population health promotion, primary health care and health promotion in the rural Alberta community. Besides this confirmation, it presents the proposal for the creation of a community health service based on the population health system. It articulates the need for developing a national device to identify the community health profile (Hitchcock, Schubert & Thomas, 2013). This will meet the diverse health needs rampant in the community in an effective manner based on the principle of equity. It has also proposed possible integration of population health promotion, primary health care and health promotion. This configuration considers the structure of introducing reforms in the health service and changes within population health. References Basford, L., & Slevin, O. (2013). Theory and practice of nursing: An integrated approach to patient care. Cheltenham, U.K: Nelson Thornes. Carroll, P. (2009). Community health nursing: A practical guide. Australia: Delmar Learning. Ervin, N.E. (2012). Advanced community health nursing practice: Population-focused care. Upper Saddle River, N.J: Prentice Hall. Gofin, J., & Gofin, R. (2011). Essentials of global community health. Sudbury, Mass: Jones & Bartlett Learning. Hitchcock, J.E., Schubert, P.E., & Thomas, S.A. (2013). Community health nursing: Caring in action. Australia: Thomson/Delmar Learning. Stanhope, M., & Lancaster, J.……

Pages: 5  |  Case Study  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Healthcare Management Healthcare Clinic Analysis the Healthcare

Healthcare Management Healthcare Clinic Analysis The healthcare clinic that is the basis of this analysis is a not-for-profit as it has revenues over $500,000 a year and files a Form 990 with the Internal Revenue Services each year. In compliance to Form 990 requirements, this clinic also provides a Conflict of Interest Policy, Whistleblower Policy and lists the CEO's salary and how it is determined (through donations). In addition to these supporting factors of their Form 990 filing, the clinic also does not compensate its board of directors, has tis financial statement auditing quarterly and has an audit committee comprised of local CPAs who donate their time to serve. In response to the more stringent reporting requirements that the IRS defined for 990-based organizations, the inclusion of salary levels and their calculations are included in nearly every not-for-profit tax filing today (Carlson, 2010). The tax-exempt status for the clinic has been maintained by not only meeting the requirements of the Form 990 but also having the majority of revenues be from donations and a foundation affiliated with a local hospital. The audit trail of revenues within the clinic's financial records is published on the intranet site and also available through the foundation. This level of transparency is critical to keep in compliance to the more stringent reporting requirements of the IRS (Speizman, 2009). Analysis of Revenues The majority of revenues (36%) are from the series of charitable organizations that together comprise the foundation supporting the hospital this clinic is associated with. There are on average 22% of revenues from clinic fees and special treatment programs, 28% from insurance subsidies for treating geriatric patients……

Pages: 2  |  Case Study  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Healthcare Services Healthcare Facility Analysis Recently a

Healthcare Services Healthcare Facility Analysis Recently a local hospital expanded its clinics in the surrounding suburban areas, and the most recent addition is being heavily promoted for its reliance on state-of-the-art scheduling and medical status updates from the physicians working there. While this location is called a clinic, it is actually a full service medical treatment facility that has general practitioners, pediatricians, and specialists on staff to support a very broad scope of patients. The majority of patients however are children as there are many families around the area. A recent visit to the waiting room showed that 70% of those waiting to see a physician are thirteen years of age or younger, with the remaining 30% being older adults in their late 50s and 60s. Services Offered As this is a spin-off from a very large and highly respected local hospital known for its treatment programs in pediatrics and orthopedic surgery, the clinic has a staff of experts in each of these areas. What make this clinic unique however is how the services are scheduled and evaluated in terms of patient satisfaction. This is the first clinic in the country to provide online registration for visits. The use of online scheduling applications and programs is critical for meeting the response-time expectations of patients (Qu, Rardin, Williams, 2011). The clinic also shows that it understands how variations in time perception change patient satisfaction as well. The use of the online scheduling system is voluntary yet already has 80% usage rates and high customer satisfaction ratings overall. Based on a visit to the clinic, it is clear that the majority of patients there are from young families, where time is at a premium and it is common to time conflicts, especially when there are multiple children in the family. Further, this approach to automated scheduling has also allowed for greater efficiency in how physicians and specialists plan out their days and also define the necessary support services and supplies they need. The more aligned time perceptions are within a healthcare provider the greater the level of efficiency and profess performance over time (Navarro-Espigares, Torres, 2011). The clinic is certainly seeing this as the pace within the waiting room was minutes instead of hours between appointments. At one point, the entire waiting room was empty, and this was during the January cold season. In addition to these services, the clinic also has…

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Healthcare Health Care Research Health Care in

Healthcare Health Care Research Health care in the United States is provided to the people by many separate sources. There is no nationwide system of government owned facilities from which the citizens can partake. Ownership of the health care system is done through private entities, although there are some federal, states, county, and city owned facilities (David, 2005). The majority of citizens have private insurance to cover the cost of medical services. Public insurance is provided for the poor in the form of Medicaid and for those over the age of 65 in the form of Medicare. Basically healthcare in the U.S. is run by the medical providers and the insurance companies. Federal spending in America on health care is staggering. In the year 2007, the U.S. spent $2.26 trillion on health care, or $7,439 per person. This was up from $2.1 trillion, or $7,026 per person, the year before. America spends roughly the same amount of money on health care each year that they do on defense. Each of these represents approximately 24% of total federal spending, and together makes up nearly half of the entire federal budget (Honore, 2009). Health care spending is not the only problem that is seen with the American health care system. One of the other problems that stem from the poorly designed health care system is that many people fall through the cracks of the system. Approximately 46 million Americans have no health insurance, and this number is continually on the rise. Those who do have health insurance find themselves with plan that is designed around healing the sick and less on prevention. The majority of the uninsured are often members of the working poor. These people are more likely to experience financial hardships caused by inadequate insurance coverage (Honore, 2009). Many experts feel that a comprehensive health care reform is needed in order to rectify the current situation. Even though the U.S. health care system is the most expensive in the world, it ranks dead last in quality health results. This poor healthcare system affects Americans from birth to death. "Infant mortality rates in America are higher than in Cuba and, astonishingly, in some American communities, babies die before the age of one at rates greater than in Vietnam" (Honore, 2009). Canada is the last industrialized nation to rely exclusively on government funding for its core healthcare system (Beaudan, 2002). Canada does…

Pages: 3  |  Thesis  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 2


Nursing Health Care Reform Health Reform Advocates

Nursing Health Care Reform Health reform advocates can improve the likelihood of enacting health reform legislation by getting large, influential groups and companies behind the plan, to help support it if it begins to lag in Congress, and reassure Americans that they can keep their current health care providers and professionals if they are happy with them. Many people fear change, and if they know they can keep their current providers, they may be more apt to approve the plan. In addition, somehow, the plan has to have the support of the health care lobbies and special interests, or it will not pass, because they have too much power in Washington, and they do not want this type of legislation to pass if they think it will lose money for them. As one of the articles notes, the health care powers are deeply entrenched in this country, and they fear change, and so, they will not back any legislation they think may harm their industry and their livelihood, so somehow, that has to be addressed and dealt with, or there will never be health care reform in this country. Author Oberlander notes, "These groups are well-organized,……

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Healthcare - HIPAA Healthcare Information Privacy Under

Healthcare - HIPAA HEALTHCARE INFORMATION PRIVACY UNDER HIPAA HIPAA and Patient Access to Medical Records: The Privacy Rule of the Health Insurance Portability (HIPAA) Act of 1996 took effect in April 2001 with compliance required as of April 2003, on the part of all covered healthcare entities. The HIPAA privacy requirements pertain to most forms of patient medical information, designating it as protected health information (PHI). Pursuant to HIPAA rules, healthcare entities may not disclose PHI except for certain limited purposes without the written consent and authorization by the patient to whom that information pertains (DHHSOCR 2003). Healthcare entities may disclose PHI to the patient him or herself after a formal written request from the patient identifying the specific information requested. Patient requests for a few specific types of PHI may be refused by the healthcare entity, such as psychotherapy notes as well as information considered to be potentially harmful to the patient or to other individuals. In that case, the patient has the right to have the denied request reviewed for a second opinion from a licensed healthcare professional (Thacker 2003). Patients also have the right to be represented by authorized third parties designated by them as a "personal representatives" for the purpose of making medical decisions for the individual or act in other ways on behalf of a decedent or the decedent's estate (DHHSOCR 2003). Generally, parents of minor children are automatically designated personal representatives of their children for HIPAA privacy compliance purposes. The right of access to PHI by personal representatives is subject to refusal by the healthcare entity only in cases of reasonable belief that the personal representative is abusing, neglecting, or otherwise endangering the welfare of the patient (Thacker 2003). Non-healthcare Use of Medical Information: Certain types of PHI disclosures for reasons not related to that patient's immediate medical care are not subject to the general HIPAA rules of nondisclosure without patient authorization. The disclosure of PHI is allowed where required by federal, state, local, or tribal laws; to public health officials for public health purposes; for certain types of permitted research; to report abuse, neglect, or domestic violence; to law enforcement entities for the purposes of criminal investigation or pursuant to court order or subpoena; and in connection with certain types of formal judicial, or administrative proceedings (Thacker 2003). Also exempt from the general HIPAA privacy rules requiring patient authorization for disclosure is PHI…

Pages: 4  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 6


Revenue for Healthcare Facilities

Revenue Healthcare Revenue for Healthcare Facilities The objective of this paper is a review of the trends, innovation and future of finances, revenue streams and investments in the healthcare industry. In doing so the author will propose several choices or alternative sources of revenues for hospitals treating an ever-increasing number of patients that rely on Medicare and Medicaid for insurance.…

Pages: 7  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 6


He Effects of Culture on Health Care

Culture and Health Care The examination of the influence of culture on health care in the African-American community identified major issues. Firstly, the rate of all major lifestyle diseases is higher in this community than other communities. Secondly, it is highly possible that cultural influences exert a powerful influence on the health care decisions made by individuals. Using secondary data…

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Health Economics Prepayment Healthcare System & Drgs

Health Economics Prepayment Healthcare System & DRGs The relationship that exists inextricably between the length of the patient stay in the hospital or other medical institution and the type of insurance held by the individual patient cannot be denied and has been in fact shown to be fact. In the examination of whether specialty and system of care exert independent…

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Russia Healthcare Russia- Healthcare Concerns the Objective

Russia Healthcare Russia- Healthcare Concerns The objective of this work is to review the healthcare concerns of Russia and specifically as related to AIDS/HIV, the blood supply and other major health concerns in the country. Russia is located on the Northern Asian continent between Europe and the Pacific Ocean and spans an area of 17.075,200 square kilometers and is slightly larger (1.8 times) the size of the United States. Russia's climate is said to range from "steppes in the south through humid continental in European Russia" to subartic temperatures in Siberia and in the polar north to have a tundra climate. Winter weather is a variation from cool in the Black Sea coastal area to frigidly cold in Siberia with variation in the summer characterized by warm weather in the steppes to cool air along the Artic coast. (Russian Demographics, 2005) the population of Russia as of July 1994 is stated at 149,608,953. (Ibid) U.S. Embassy Travelers Advisory According to the U.S. Embassy in Russia all Americans traveling to Russia should make sure that their diptheria immunization is up-to-date as well as their typhoid immunization. The U.S. Embassy warns that travelers should be careful of what they are consuming in foods and beverages and that they should drink only bottled water or water that has been boiled. Reported October 31, 2006 is that a court in Russian has ordered a regional blood bank to pay thousands to a woman who caught AIDS via a transfusion. (United Press International, 2006) According to many reports the blood supply in Russia is severely contaminated. II. Russian Health Reform recent report entitled: "Russia Readies Radical Health Care Reform" states that: "According to an age-old proverb, it is better to be rich and healthy than poor and sick - a saying made all the more true in a country where some say the public health care system is nearly as ill as its patients. Russian health care has not been seriously reformed since the collapse of the former Soviet Union in 1991. But earlier this year, the Russian government launched a so-called national projects plan that aims to improve four sectors of Russian life, including health care." (McAdams, 2006) in fact it is reported that over the last ten years the health of the "average Russian has grown 'significantly worse'. Life expectancy is stated to have "fallen from 70 years to 65 with Russian men…

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Marketing in Healthcare Catholic Healthcare

The mission of the CHW is to provide those in disadvantaged financial positions with excellent health care. It is also their mission to do so in a spirit of Christ-like compassion and love. If a paradigm of wellness is to be adopted, programs such as community education events could be implemented. These could focus on educating the public regarding the maintenance of health and the prevention of illness. The focus can still be the poor and of course the acute illness care unit can still operate for those who need it. However, if wellness is a greater focus within the organization, some of the existing facilities could be converted to become education centers to help people focus on wellness. For any organization to grow, new products need to be developed and marketed. CHW can use this principle to implement new programs for the increased wellness of the community. In fact, preventing illness is particularly a need within poor communities, where CHW focuses its services. Furthermore CHW can use its principle of collaboration to successfully implement a wellness program. The government can also be involved in such initiatives. It is also important to monitor consumer needs in order to implement a new program or product successfully. This can be done by means of community surveys. In order to then fulfill and perpetuate its mission and vision, CHW can implement more focus upon wellness in order to meet community needs. Bibliography Allen, G. "New Product Development." 1999 Catholic Healthcare West. 2003. http://www.chwhealth.com/ Rice, T., B. Biles, E.R. Brown, F. Diderichsen & H. Kuehn. "Reconsidering the role of competition in health care markets." Journal of Health Politics,……

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Laws and Health Care

I am hoping that this idea of physician-assisted suicide becomes more commonplace in the health care industry due to the compassion that ironically may provide for those wishing to emphasize the quality of their lives over the quantity of their lives. This emphasis may provide a more effective, efficient, economic, and humane environment that allows for more reason and compassion to flourish. Laws and regulations are necessary, but to me it seems the less local the law, the more harmful it is to those of us in the health care industry that are left to deal with the mess. References Anderson, A. (2014). The Impact of the Affordable Care Act on the Health Care Workforce. The Heritage Foundation, 18 Mar 2014. Retrieved from http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2014/03/the-impact-of-the-affordable-care-act-on-the-health-care-workforce Emanuel, E.J., Daniels, E.R., Fairclough, D.L., & Clarridge, B.R. (1996). Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide: attitudes and experiences of oncology patients, oncologists, and the public. The Lancet, 347(9018), 1805-1810. McClanahan, C. (2012). Cliffs Notes Version of the ACA. Forbes, 9 July 2012. Retrieved from http://www.forbes.com/sites/carolynmcclanahan/2012/07/09/cliffs-notes-version-of-the-affordable-care-act/ Pereira, J. (2012). Legalizing euthanasia or assisted suicide: the illusion of safeguards and control. Current Oncology, Apr 2011, 18 (2). Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3070710/ Ward, P.R. (1997). Health care rationing: can we afford to ignore euthanasia?. Health Services Management Research, 10(1-2), 32-41.…

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Health Information Improving Healthcare With

The CMS indicates that "PHRs help providers get the information they need to treat you in an emergency by quickly sharing information on your medications, allergies, and emergency contacts. You can let others have access to your PHR for just this situation." Faster, more seamless sharing of health information is seen as an important way of promoting a continuity of care. This continuity of care means that following hospitalization, a patient's care strategy can remain in place and be easily communicated to a primary physician, specialist or other caregiver. In turn, this denotes an opportunity to reduce the likelihood of a patient returning to the emergency room within close proximity to an initial visit. Because there is such a great pressure on hospitals not simply to reduce the occurrence of high readmission rates but also to substantially improve the integration of Information Technologies with which to do so, the Health Information Systems Managers is a critical role-player in the future of most hospitals and healthcare facilities. Conclusion: In light of the sweeping changes impacting the healthcare industry today, finding technology-driven solutions for high readmission rates is the most salient issue for the Health Information Manager. Certainly, by exploring ways of improving the infrastructure, format and usage of these health records, said manager may go a long way toward helping patients get better health outcomes, helping hospitals improve their performance and helping the healthcare industry on the whole reign in the wasteful patterns in its past. Works Cited: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). (2012). Personal Health Records……

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Roles of Health Care Teams

Australia Health Teams Health Teams in Australian Primary Health Population, Primary Health and Partnership Health: Addressing Australia's healthcare needs on a population-wide basis calls for the involvement of a wide array of public agencies, private companies, research institutions and treatment facilities. Because of Australia's diverse and increasingly diversifying population, it is important that primary healthcare providers act according to the differing needs of all groups. Indeed, there is a relationship between diversity and poverty which is often disregarded, but which bears a direct correlation to such crucial matters as whether an individual has access to a primary care physician or is in a locality where healthcare resources are sufficiently available. In Australia, we are faced with the sobering reality that life expectancy, infant mortality and ailment survival rate are all health indexes where white Australians fare considerably better than Aboriginal and non-white communities. These are the types of inequalities which suggest that are health system is at present poorly equipped to contend with the challenges implied by diversity. And though it may be tempting for some to dismiss this as an inherent byproduct of wealth distribution imbalance, it cannot be denied that may of these distribution lines cut across ethnic lines. Moreover, their impact on the overall quality of the Australian healthcare system is decidedly negative, with its unwillingness to adapt for diversity considerably diminishing public health as a credible source of care of those of economically disinclined ethnicities. Therefore, to the end of meeting its own mission, Australia's primary healthcare system must be more attuned to the realities of racial inequality by working in all regards to promote equal treatment to all patrons. Simultaneously, this denotes that a greater understanding of the challenges unique to individual subcultures within Australia is essential amongst registered nurses. As the site produced by the Australian Government (2011) denotes, efforts at meeting these challenges are highly bound to Partnership Health strategies that integrate the functions, resources and goals of an array of different health-associated groups. Particularly, the Australian Government refers to HealthTeam Australia (HTA), which it describes as a consortium of groups designed to meet health metrics both domestically and abroad. Accordingly, the site reports, "HTA brings together the best in the industry to create one powerful team of healthcare professionals who offer clients innovative and reliable solutions. In the fast changing healthcare sector solutions must be robust and evidence-based whilst being flexible enough…

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Health Prevention Initiatives and Cost Containment

¶ … managed health care and evaluates their validity and success rate. The writer explores cost containment, health prevention, health population focus and other elements of managed health care to determine their probable success or failure. There were four sources used to complete this paper. Managed Health Care Revisited As America's health care costs continue to skyrocket and the public…

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 4


Health Policy Influence Health Policy

That is part of the reason that it is so confusing for leaders who are dealing with Obamacare. They want to make policies that work for them and their organizations, but they also have to follow the policies that were created by the Obama Administration. In other words, they cannot simply make a policy that works for health care, unless it works with a specific type of health care (i.e. Obamacare). The Obamacare policy will affect health delivery in organizations because of the requirements that so many people join up and get coverage. While getting health care coverage is very important, the large number of people with insurance is going to inundate those who are offering health care, like doctors and hospitals (Torrens, 2013). That inundation can lower the quality of care given to people who need it, and stop leaders in the health care field from making policy changes that would be beneficial to everyone involved. As a health care leader, it would be impossible to seamlessly integrate the policy. However, there are ways in which it can be made easier. One of those would be to be as prepared for it as possible before it officially takes effect on January 1st of 2014. Doing that can allow for changes to be made that will ease the flow of new patients and make things easier for the health care workers and the patients who are being treated by them. Until the policy really takes effect and has been used for some time, it is hard to tell how well it will work out. Leaders in the health care industry will have to keep their focus on what they have been doing right for years, and determine what kinds of changes have to be made as the policy takes effect. Only then can they make more adjustments and lead their workers in the right direction as Obamacare continues to require changes into the future. References Barr, D.A. (2011). Introduction to U.S. health policy: The organization, financing, and delivery of health care in America. NY: JHU Press. CCH (2010). Law, explanation and analysis of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: Including Reconciliation Act impact. CCH Incorporated. Torrens, P.R. (2013). Chapter 13 Understanding health policy. Introduction……

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Health Program Bronx Racial Disparities

Belief is often one of the most powerful determinants of how an individual will respond to emergent health concerns. This correlates not just to how individuals pursue individual health concerns but, further, extends to how individuals interact with the broader health system. The belief amongst minorities that options do not exist for healthcare access or coverage may prevent interaction with the system at critical levels. To this end, the Calman text refers to the nature of an outreach and education program that begins with a call for universal health insurance coverage. To an extent, health behavior relating to the seeking of health insurance coverage is often impacted by a belief that no access exists for those of limited means. Calman notes that "there must be increased outreach and a simplified enrollment process for existing government health insurance programs so that all eligible people can participate. Long and complicated application forms, confusion about eligibility, and being made to answer personal questions are among the top reasons for not enrolling cited by Medicaid eligible survey respondents." (Calman, p. 493) The array of reasons given for not attempting constructive interaction with the healthcare system speak to the power that the factor of belief can have on health behaviors. According to the mission provided by the Bronx Health REACH, there is significant cause to believe that a push toward a change in the beliefs of minority groups can have a substantial impact on health behavior. However, it is also the case that the segregationist practices and limited access to knowledge on healthcare rights have contributed to what is founded sense of distrust for many minority groups. Thus, practices must change at the healthcare operational level in order to effectively bring about changes in the perceptions of patients. Selected Educational Resource: Perhaps the most important premise to emerge from the present research is that concerning the continued disparity that occurs as a function of race in the U.S. To an extent, the actions of the civil rights era have helped to obscured continued and severe differences in standards of living as they occur in such contexts as the healthcare system. It is thus that the Bronx Health REACH website offers some crucial educational resources for the visitor's consideration. Indeed, the Resource Center provides a bevy of links detailing racially driven health disparities, such as that entitled Take Action on Health Disparity! (http://www.bronxhealthreach.org/resource-center/educational-materials-and-toolkits/health-disparity/) This links to…

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Community Health Strategies

¶ … Disease Control and Prevention (www.cdc.gov) reports that about 50 million people (that is one in five Americans) are living with "at least one disability." Moreover, the CDC claims that "most Americans" at some time in their lives will suffer a disability. As to how the CDC reached the average of one in five, the United States Healthy People…

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Oklahoma Health

Oklahoma Health Oklahoma's Health Two significant features of Oklahoma's demographics that are important from a health perspective are the low proportion of African-Americans that live in the state and the very high proportion of Native Americans that live in the state, when compared to national demographics. The low proportion of African-Americans in the state means that special care must be taken not to simply ignore this segment of the population when it comes to health policy and determining health needs, and likewise the large proportion of Native Americans that live in the state need specific and explicit inclusion in the development of healthcare policy due to the special problems and concern facing this segment of the population. Another interesting demographic feature of Oklahoma is that less than ten percent of the population speaks a language other than English as the primary language in their homes, meaning it might be far more difficult for these individuals to receive healthcare communications and information that they are able to fully and easily understand. 2) The leading cause of death in Oklahoma is the same as the leading cause of death in the United States, heart disease. There are fifty more deaths per hundred-thousand in Oklahoma than in the United States as a whole, however (242.1 in Oklahoma, compared to 190.9 in the United States), meaning that Oklahoma is experiencing a significantly higher rate of mortality from heart disease. Given the eating habits and favorite foods of the region, it is likely that increased consumption of cholesterols and fats -- combined with more-than-typically-sedentary lifestyles of many Oklahomans -- is the reason for this disproportionate mortality. 3) Diabetes is a major problem for the population of Oklahoma, as the sixth leading cause of death and a part of the diagnosis for one in five patients admitted to hospitals in the state. Two risk factors that are specifically identified by the State of the State report regarding diabetes include a lack of physical activity and obesity, which are of course related but are also distinct. Oklahoma has greater obesity rates and, as far as can be measured, a more sedentary population than the United States on average, and these are the major reasons behind Oklahoma's increased incidence of diabetes. Again, it is largely due to the nutritional choices of the population in Oklahoma and the sedentary lifestyles that are lived by the state's citizens that the…

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Health How Does Health Matter? Angus Deaton

Health How Does Health Matter? Angus Deaton is an economist who has studied the aggregate health levels in countries though indices such as average life expectancy and compared them to another of other factors. He and many other economists have found that there are strong correlations between health and income and there is an enormous amount of inequality in the world on both measures. He states that people in poor countries live shorter lives than people in rich countries so that, if we take income and health together, there is more inequality in the world than if we consider income alone. However, he also states that if you looked at other factors such as education, telephones per household, or percentage of the population who owns cars would also correlate with health and the graphs would look almost identical to the health and income. However, many people have expected for health to rise with income as developing countries continue to develop yet this does not appear to necessarily be the case. Although continued development has been shown to reduce the levels of poverty it has not shown to improve health conditions as many have thought. The lecturer noted that many of the health conditions that plague poorer nations does not necessarily require state of the art technology. Rather many conditions that lower the life expectancy can be treated with low tech solutions. One such problem is that there are many people in poorer nations that die from diseases that can be treated with ordinary antibiotics. These antibiotics can be produced inexpensively and could substantially improve health conditions in poorer nations. The life expectancy dispersion among the countries of the……

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Advanced Practice Nursing Advanced Practice

Right within those numbers is a sign that it's so much a new field that not enough attention is being paid to it. The article breaks down information on the 70,000 nurses currently certified by the American Nurses Credentialing Center, showing that 2,000 of those 70,000 are trained in geriatrics. And of those 2,000, nearly 80% work in nursing homes;…

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Excess of Five Million U.S.

Assault seldom happens devoid of oral violence. The publication, "Violence in the Emergency Department: Tools & Strategies to Create a Violence-Free ED" by Patricia Allen provides the STAMP method which illustrates high-risk habits for example staring as well as pacing (Allen, 2009). Method of Handling a Potentially Aggressive Person Rely on your feelings if you think uneasy around someone. Be…

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Nice Standards Nice Compliance Standards

All of these risk factors pose an additional risk for thrombosis. Complications that may additionally increase the risk for thrombosis may include a recent hip fracture or knee replacement or surgery which may increase immobility (DH, 2010). Factors that may impose an increased bleeding risk may include acquired bleeding disorders, use of certain medications including anticoagulants, acute stroke, thrombocytopenia, uncontrolled…

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Business of Health Care This

Coverage -- In a move to give health insurance coverage, additional people will generate a new trend of challenges. Failure to improve access means there would be still a problem in care delivery. Medicaid and Medicaid patients have demonstrated it challenging to find a physician or doctor. Having adequate health care providers to take care of new patients will be…

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Healthcare Management Australia's Health Care

Just as has been enumerated initially, state government funding for healthcare mainly comes from general taxation; block grants and specific purpose payments from the Australian government; funding from state fiscal resources; and funding from non-governmental sources. A state Health Departments budget must be within its budgetary process. Health grants to the states from the Commonwealth are disbursed based on population formula and performance measurements. States that secure large health grants are more likely to suffer reduced revenue from the Commonwealth. Some of the grants given to individual states are subject to fiscal equalization (Healy, Sharman & Lokuge, 2006). This equalization done by the Commonwealth Grants Commission is meant to ensure that all states are capable of providing adequate health services without levying higher taxes on the citizens. Under the Australian Health Care Agreements, public hospitals are a state responsibility. The Commonwealth therefore provides capped prospective block grants to the states. Agreements are therefore reached on basis of the level of Commonwealth involvement. In this regard performance indicators and service targets have been set out. This gives states some considerable flexibility in resource allocation to hospitals (Healy, Sharman & Lokuge, 2006). States often encourage patients to see private doctors who bill Medicare instead of attending state run public hospitals by offering incentives. Salaried medical officers are employees of hospitals and are therefore paid salaries to work at the hospital full time. Visiting medical officers are just but independent contractors and are paid for services they render. The Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) offers financial assistance to patients to cover costs of services rendered by medical practioners, participating optometrists, practice nurses, dentists, and other allied health professionals. The Pharmaceuticals Benefits Scheme (PBS) ensures that those who are eligible for Medicare get affordable access to a wide range of necessary cost-effective prescription medicine. Eligible patients not having Health Care Card, Pensioner Concession Card, or Commonwealth Seniors Health Card are required to pay up to $34.20 for each prescription item for medicines listed on the PBS. Under private health insurance, health insurers may offer policies that cover the above costs of the prescription items as part of hospital treatment. The National Healthcare Specific Purpose Payments (SPPS) enables states to fund public hospital and health services. It has since been replaced by National Health Reform funding. National Partnership Agreement funds the delivery of specific projects or reforms by states and territories. Hospital reform, preventive health, and…

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Healthcare Legal Issues: Care and

Under such circumstances, doctors generally have patients sign waivers giving up their rights to full disclosures. If the patient had prior knowledge of the risks (having undergone the surgery or procedure previously), or if the risks are common knowledge (such as pain following suturing a wound), there is generally no duty to repeat or expressly inform of these risks. Measuring…

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Health Care System

Health Care System There are many factors that have affected the development of the health care system in the U.S. These include a larger number of baby boomers needing services, a significant number of individuals who do not have health insurance, and a political system that is struggling with ways to accommodate those needing insurance without raising debt levels beyond where they already are. All three of those issues are major concerns for the country at the current time, and they do not show signs of going away anytime soon. The large number of baby boomers cannot be helped, but because there is such a significant number of Americans reaching Medicare age all at once the system is going to be burdened with their cost (Tulenko et al., 2009). Additionally, the system will also be burdened with the care itself, because more resources will be needed for these individuals as they get older and have more health problems for which they require treatment and medications (Bond & Bond, 1994). Overall, the baby boomers are among the top three most significant issues when it comes to the current U.S. health care system. Those who do not have health insurance are also a serious burden on the system. Health insurance costs so much that many people cannot afford it, yet they make too much to get government-funded insurance such as Medicaid (Simmons, 2009). Because of that they simply go uninsured until a small problem becomes a big one. Then they seek out treatment at the emergency room and end up struggling with the medical bills from that. At the same time the hospital loses out because it will likely not get paid from those people, since they had no money to begin with. Politically this is a serious issue, as well, but the current plan to force all Americans to purchase health care may not be the right one to help the country get out of debt and help millions of Americans live lives that are healthier. Over the next decade, these three issues will all continue to affect the health care system in the U.S. (Simmons, 2009; Tulenko et al., 2009). The baby boomers will continue to age and their demands on the health care system will become greater. The people who cannot afford insurance will continue to struggle in a flagging economy, and political pressures will keep those who are…

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Improving Local Health Care: Quality

Therefore, there is an increased need to adopt several process-improvement framework or techniques since medical errors are brought by system or process failures. These process-improvement frameworks can be adopted in the system by applying them in the management of IM/IT department. Some of the major examples of process improvement frameworks include Six Sigma, failure modes and effects analysis, Lean Management, Plan-Do-Study-Act, and Root Cause Analysis. These measures have widely been used in the health sector to improve the safety and quality of care services to patients. The first recommendation for applying various process improvement frameworks in the management of IM/IT department is Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI). As a means for developing clinical practice, continuous quality improvement is based on the principal that the health care system has room for improvement in every process and occasion. This approach is usually directed by clinicians and geared towards a comprehensive understanding of the complexity of delivery of care services. Unlike research initiatives, continuous quality improvements provide relevant information that is applicable to the health care facility (Hughes, 2008). Secondly, internal benchmarking can be used for applying several process improvement frameworks. This application focuses on identifying best practices within the facility, comparing the best practices, and comparing current practice over time. This process should also incorporate external benchmarking since the internal process does not necessarily reflect the best practices in other health care facilities. This provides the health care organization with an opportunity to compare its best practices with those of other facilities in order to determine the quality of its services and processes. The use of benchmarking is important in this process because it helps the facility to determine the extent with which it is delivering quality care. Management Database: A successful and effective service knowledge management system is dependent on a robust configuration management database. This is primarily because the management database acts as the source of configuration details and relationships that individuals rely on to control services in the entire lifecycle. Notably, a robust configuration management database serves as a store of information related to each component of an information management system. Therefore, a robust configuration management database is linked to service framework and operational efficiency. A robust configuration management database could be beneficial to the local health services provider because it plays an essential role in the service management framework, technology management, and providing important information regarding operations. The major…

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Mental Health Aged Care Elective

Mental Health Aged Care Mental Health / Aged Care Elective As human beings progress to age into their sixties, most of their bodily functions are beginning to impair. With diseases such as dementia, Alzheimer's, cardiac problems, cerebrovascular diseases (such as strokes), Osteoporosis, and so many more prevalent in senior citizens, it is essential that they are given twenty-four hour care…

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Flows in Health Care Since

Patients departing their home country in search of remedial treatment abroad, is indeed not a new happening, though, the swift growth and the extent of medical travel are new. It is anticipated that medical travel will grow up further in the near future providing new horizons for growth. The costs are high due to the following factors: So much paperwork…

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Policy Changes in Healthcare Finance

These findings suggest that ASCs will remain viable, thrive even, if they diversify and offer both rare and common procedures. A more recent analysis predicting the winners and losers during the 2009 calendar year suggested that the losers will be gastrointestinal (-6%), neurological (-3%), and ophthalmology (-1%) (Editors, 2008). By contrast, the winners were expected to be integumentary (7%), genitourinary…

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Culture's Impact on Healthcare Culture:

" Independence is seen in this culture as a valued ideal, but no real sense of true independence is actually demonstrated. Midwestern folks like the idea of freedom and independence, but when forced with the option, most are happy to go along with the crowd and keep pace with their neighbors. Standing out in the crowd is reserved for the more extreme Midwestern personalities. Question 4 Midwestern culture and the health risks associated with this type of lifestyle are not exceedingly dangerous, but do represent the in proportion, the typical health problems of any American. Diet and exercise are two areas of preventive health that need attention and focus in this group of people. Midwesterners like to watch a lot of TV, also causing intellectual and psychological problems that are also present in many people today. Question 5 The Midwest is traditional in many ways, with a background in rural living. As a result certain healthcare attitudes regarding holistic methods and homeopathic approaches are also sporadically present in some areas. The lack of professional medical outlets in some more sparsely populated areas may resort to this style of healing, but in general, allopathic procedures rule the day for this culture, as modern day doctors and nurses are held in high esteem and are well respected. References Arterberry, K. (nd). Cultural Competence. Provided by customer. Hearnden, M. (2008). Coping with differences in culture……

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Case Management Managed Care

Healthcare The Impacts of Case Management and Managed Care on Health Care Cost Reduction The United States has the priciest health care system in the world, with per capita health expenditures far above those of any other country. For a lot of years, U.S. health care expenditures have been rising faster than the overall rate of inflation in the economy.…

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Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

Healthcare Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) was passed to make sure that all Americans have access to quality, affordable health care. This law is expected to create the change within the health care system that is necessary to control costs. The PPACA achieves a basic transformation of health insurance in the United States through shared responsibility. Systemic insurance market reorganization will do away with prejudiced practices such as pre-existing condition exclusions. Attaining these reforms without escalating health insurance premiums will mean that all Americans must be part of the system and must have coverage. Tax credits for people will make sure that insurance is reasonably priced for everyone (the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Detailed Summary, n.d.). This law is going to effect employers in a number of different ways. Under PPACA, employers are not directly obligated to offer coverage to their workers. Yet, the measure includes strong inducements for several of them to do so. Starting in 2014, large employers will face monetary fines if any of their full-time workers obtains a premium credit through an exchange. If the employer does not provide coverage to its workers, or if the employer provides coverage that is not reasonably priced based on PPACA standards, a worker may be entitled to a premium credit that would prompt a fine on the employer. If one were to look at this in regards to a hospital, as an employer they will have to make sure that they offer insurance coverage that is affordable so that they do not face any penalties for not doing so. "Employers that provide coverage will be required to provide a "free choice" voucher to low-income employees that meet certain requirements to enable them to enroll in a plan offered through an exchange" (the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: An Overview of Its Potential Impact on State Health Programs, 2010). For employers who offer health insurance bene-ts, this new law has a deeper challenge than standard compliance with new regulations. What may once have been a pure HR function now will necessitate coordination and collective leadership with ?nance, tax, risk, and operations. Administrating the bottom-line cost of health insurance may even necessitate some companies to reorganize their workforce models. Health insurance exchanges and other modernizations may provide workers with more choices. The cost-bene-t analysis of failure to offer coverage…

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