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Essays on "Israel / Palestine / Arab World"  |  Term Papers 1-40

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Israel and Palestine

Israel and Palestine In order or answer the central question of this paper and to understand the present situation of a two - state solution to the Israeli - Palestinian conflict, it is firstly necessary to understand the origins and the genesis of the problem in the region. As one commentator states, "The conflict between Palestine and Israel, between Arab…

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Human Rights in the Arab

There was even a statement that said that nearly 1000's of people were in prison due to political detainment and hundreds of others were missing. The fact that Syrian law does not allow the condemned to stand for oneself in the court of law and the fact that most of the judges and law bearers are corrupted goes to show…

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Arab Transnationalism in History

Arab Transnationalism The Arab World has extended its sphere of influence over other territories from around the world throughout history and there are a series of examples demonstrating this. Many countries today contain evidence concerning Arab influences and much of the political culture in the Arab world has been made possible as a result of transnational movements established by Arabs…

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Geert Hofstede: Cultural Dimensions Please

In terms of business this short-term orientation focuses on quick results i.e. companies are driven by quarterly results. Consumption is driven by immediate gratification, sensitivity to social trends and rituals. There's not much focus on saving. Management is based on self-reliance, personal achievement, hard work and managers are judged on short-term results. No scores available for Indonesia and the Arab World on this dimension. In summary, France and Italy have the most in common, both being Western, democratic societies, although France is both more authoritarian and less masculine than Italy. Both are highly individualistic and short-term in temporal orientation, though. Indonesia and the Arab World all score high on the Power Distance scale compared to Italy, which makes them more authoritarian societies. France and Italy are both highly individualistic Western societies, while Indonesia and the Arab World are collectivist cultures. Italy is by far the most masculine culture of the four, followed by the Arab world, with France and Indonesia more on the feminine side. France, Italy and the Arab World all have a high desire for avoidance of uncertainty while Indonesia scores only medium low on this index. Both France and Italy are short-term……

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Israel 1948 Was One of the Key

¶ … Israel 1948 was one of the key turning points in the political development of the contemporary Middle East. From 1948 on, Israel was an independent state ruled by their own government which brought Israeli organizations together under one rule, liberated from foreign influence. After the creation of the State of Israel, frequent wars in opposition to its existence…

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Source and Future of National Identity in Israel

Israel and Palestine Zionist Movement The Zionist movement began in the late 19th century. It reflected the idea that, after centuries of persecution and Diaspora, which began in the 6th century B.C., when the Jews were forced out of Israel and exiled to Babylonia; Jews should rebuild their original homeland in Israel (Ram, 1998). Only when Jews had a state,…

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Muslims and Arabs Has Remained a Source

¶ … Muslims and Arabs has remained a source of confusion as well as discrimination. In this paper we explore the difference between Muslim and Arabs with a special focus on Pan-Arabism. Saddam Hussein and Nasser's roles in Pan-Arabism are also explored. The differences between Muslims and Arabs are illustrated by means of elaborate examples and scenarios. The term Arab…

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Arab-Israeli Conflict

¶ … establishment of the Israeli State and the long subsequent series Arab-Israeli wars over it has been at the heart of Middle Eastern conflict over six decades. The fundamental conflict between Israel and the Palestines displaced by the first offensive Arab attacks on the nascent Israeli state continues to fuel tensions throughout the entire region. Unlike many other conflicts…

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Water Shortage in the Middle East

Water Shortage in the Middle East Water Shortage and Consequent Conflicts in the Middle East Even before food, two elements are vital for the survival of an individual, and for life on a planet to exist: air and water. The characteristics of water which make it indispensable for life are endless, including both personal consumption and hygiene, as well as…

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Egypt's Foreign Relations With the United States and the Arab States

¶ … Egypt/U.S. Relationship in a new Arab World The world has historically had many hotspots. One, for instance, was the area surrounding Austria Hungary, which later morphed into the area surrounding Germany. Countless wars were fought in those regions, with tens of millions dead, and families constantly uprooted and moved to different locations from "homes" that were no longer…

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Foreign Policy Regarding Israel &

Israel has only one-tenth of a percent of the population of the world and still receives nearly 40% of U.S. aid, and that is generally more than $3.5 billion a year now. There are other funds also transferred and that is more than $1 billion a year also. The closeness to Israel of United States has compelled U.S. To use its veto in its support in United Nations to protect it from censure many times. (10 Things to Know about U.S. Policy in the Middle East) The problems caused through American foreign policy and the actions of Israel are in two ways. The first is that it seems clear all the time that America is supporting the actions of Israel though the actions are against basic values of America -- life, liberty, rule of law, and the principle that a person is innocent till proven guilty. An individual may be acting in a way that he feels fit, but a national government cannot operate in that manner. The support of America for Israel is clear to not only Palestinians, but to the rest of the Arab world, as the support is seen both in military form as also political forms. (Israel's Policy of Targeting Terrorists: Implications for the U.S.) Yet it does not seem that there will be any changes in this policy in America. One of the Democratic contenders against President Bush had clearly stated that he did not have any fundamental objection to the policies followed by Bush. There were calls from him for an end to violence by Palestinians, but no call for an end to violence by Israel. There were also no calls for end of Israeli occupation, Israel's compliance with resolutions of United Nations Security council, or even a call for withdrawal from the occupied territories, etc. (Howard Dean: Hawk in Dove's Clothing?) In short, there is going to be no change in America's policy even if the opposition came to power. Conclusion: Making recommendations to the U.S. government regarding its policies on Israel and Palestine would just be a waste of breath. References Zaharna, R.S. Israel's Policy of Targeting Terrorists: Implications for the U.S. Volume 6, Number 32. September 2001. Retrieved from http://www.fpif.org/briefs/vol6/v6n32exjud_body.html Accessed 4 September, 2005 Zunes, Stephen. Howard Dean: Hawk in Dove's Clothing? February 26, 2003. Retrieved from http://www.commondreams.org/views03/0226-04.htm Accessed 4 September, 2005 Zunes, Stephen. 10 Things to Know about U.S. Policy…

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Israeli Occupation of the Gaza

It is therefore evident that U.S. financial aid actually becomes a source for other countries to commit violence, injustice, and atrocities against other countries or societies. It is also worth noting that Petter's article was a personal narration of her condition and the political debacle she had to go through in order to justify the protest she had joined at Israel. Speaking for other people's protests against Israel's commitment of injustice against Palestine, she asserted, "[f]or daring to witness and report the brutal effects the wall is taking on the Palestinian population, I have been deemed a "security threat" by the State of Israel ... " Her narrative remained an open-ended report on the continuing conflict between Israel and Palestine supporters. The personal tone that Petter maintained in her article worked in making her article an effective and persuasive piece. Her first-hand account of violence about the controversy at the Gaza strip, and her outright condemnation of the U.S. government's support of the Israel government's policies and actions on its conflict with Palestine had been clear enough for the readers to know the author's position about the issue. Based on these characteristics of the author and the editorial she wrote, it is not surprising then that she would entice readers to support her advocacy on the injustices committed against Palestine. Though Petter's personal tone may work against her as a journalist, the circumstances under which she wrote her narrative becomes admissible enough for the readers to empathize and agree with her thoughts and opinions about the issue being discussed. Overall, the author provided persuasive and more informative news about the Israel-Palestine conflict more than Buchanan did in his editorial.…

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History of the Modern Middle East

History Of the Modern Middle East As a result of the Industrial Revolution, during the 19th and the 20th centuries, the Western world as grew more dependent upon the advancement of technology, in every facet of daily existence. As an unintentional result of this economic revolution, the major commercial powers grew more dependent upon the non-renewable resource of oil. The…

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Hamas and Fatah: Palestinian Territories

¶ … Politics [Foreign Policy Questions and Answers Both Hamas and Fatah continue in their struggle for political control of the Palestinian Territories and economic control of the support that comes from outside. This has led to open fighting along factional lines. What impact do you think this will have on the region and on the efforts to find peace with Israel? The present Hamas vs. Fatah political and other factionalism in Palestine clearly will not and cannot help the peace process. Palestinians must be united and sincere in a desire for peace; and (at least in my own opinion) this has not ever happened and is clearly not happening now. There has been much more (albeit always-evaporated, at least so far) hope for peace in the area in the past. During the Oslo peace process of about 1993 through 2000, it seemed that peace among Israel and the Palestinian factions, with whom Israel has been at war six decades and counting, might actually finally occur. It did not. After that in 2006, before Israel's then-Prime Minister Ariel Sharon had a massive stroke leaving him comatose and his political heir Ehud Olmert succeeded him, it seemed Sharon's peace plan might work. Recently due to horrendous military decisions of Olmert's government during the 2006 Israel-Lebanon conflict that again infuriated the Arab world and much of the rest of the world, the peace process is stalled again (and this is very, very far from being the first time). With Hamas and Fatah literally at each other's own throats and both hating Israel equally; and with so much international attention, especially but not exclusively among Arab states again focused on Israeli military ruthlessness; and with Hamas having won the 2006 Palestinian election but Mahoud Abbas of Fatah remaining President, it is difficult to portend future progress toward peace in the region. Moreover, for peace to ever truly happen, the Palestinian leadership must truly want peace. Before his death in 2004, then-PLO leader Yasser Arafat had written a groundbreaking letter stating the PLO's recognition of Israel's right to exist. This was an enormously encouraging sign; since 1948, when the then-new state of Israel declared its independence, Palestinian Arabs have felt their territory to have been encroached upon by Israel, and have therefore vowed since then to destroy Israel. But Arafat did not ever truly want peace; and it seems even more unlikely that either…

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Arabs Certain Words Must Be Understood Not

Arabs Certain words must be understood not only for maximum clarity, but because misunderstanding those words can actually be a matter of life and death, especially when the meaning of those words are taken for granted. Thus, while defining the term "Arab" is not itself a difficult task, being able to precisely define the term has nonetheless remained important due…

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Achieving Peace in the Middle

But the majority of Israelis and Palestinians, who want to live their lives without fear or fighting, know that their only lasting escape is through an agreement acceptable to both sides (After, 2002) Led by Saudi Arabia, all the Arab countries have now said that they will accept Israel once it has withdrawn from its conquests in the 1967 war, a withdrawal first demanded by the UN Security Council 35 years ago. The two-state solution is now even agreed to by Mr. Sharon, though his concept of a Palestinian state on less than half the West Bank would be, in Palestinian words, no more than a collection of "statelets in Israel's belly (After, 2002)." Each time there is a war the hatred grows deeper and stronger on both sides. In addition the current and ever growing technology has begun to preset itself as clear and present danger should either side determine it will use it against the other. These facts bring to light the urgency of resolving this century old conflict in the near future. The easy solution is to have the Palestinians give up the land. However they object to such a solution based on the fact that they have already given up 78% of it in various deals to try and achieve peace. "Of the 3.5m Palestinians in the occupied territories, 2.5m live in the West Bank or East Jerusalem and 1m in Gaza. In the West Bank, under the Oslo process, they have full control only over the cities, or 18% of the territory- -and since the latest Israeli incursions, this has been lost. In Gaza, they controlled about 75% of the land before the intifada, but buffer zones and new roads have now reduced this to nearer 60%(After, 2002). The Israelis have about 200,000 settlers in the West Bank, and roughly the same number (though they do not call them settlers) in East Jerusalem. They also have some 7,000 zealously guarded settlers in Gaza." Looking at a solution involves checking the law. The Palestine's have international law on their side of the argument (After, 2002). It was begun and passed in 1948 and has often been called upon to remind the world of its righteous (After, 2002). The best solution at this point is to have both sides agree on a third party that they trust and will abide by the decision the third party makes.…

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Middle East the Crisis in the Middle

Middle East The crisis in the Middle East seems to have no end. Even within Israel and Palestine, citizens disagree over what policies can and should resolve the conflict and eliminate violence. Intervention from the international community is only likely to cause further resentment, especially on the part of the Palestinians who believe that their predicament was caused by Western imperialism. Indeed, colonialism and imperialism are at the root of the problems facing Israel and Palestine. The only viable solution to the crisis is the swift creation of a Palestinian state, coupled with the removal of the settlements on the West Bank. However, the problem will not vanish if a Palestinian state exists or if the occupied territories are returned to the Palestinians. Terrorism has become an unfortunate part of the political and social fabric of the Middle East. Extricating terrorism depends on a systematic change in education and other social institutions. Moreover, a great deal……

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Jordan Political Structure

Jordan Political Structure The democratization process in the Arab world Democracy is a form of government in which citizens are part of the decision making process. For the past sixteen years and especially since September 11, 2001, authoritarian government in the Arab world have been pressured by civil society organizations (CSOs) into implementing thorough reforms, a method considered by western…

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Terrorism Chapter 10 of Jonathan

This is true as well for the formation of Hezbollah, an even more radical group than the PLO. Hezbollah is a self-conscious and self-affirming anti-Israeli organization that foments tension in the region and embraces terrorist activity as part of its core agenda. The organization is primarily based in southern Lebanon and was a response to the Israeli invasion of Lebanon and the post-colonial activities of Europeans and Americans. Iran supported Hezbollah initially as part of an overall scheme to divest Israel of its political legitimacy ("Hezbollah" History and Overview"). White offers both a sympathetic and a critical view of Hezbollah, which provides a responsible and balanced approach to the study of terrorism in the region. White shows that terrorism is viewed as a legitimate response to perceived (and actual) oppression. In the case of Palestine, terrorist groups most certainly do serve as proxy governments for people who are politically disenfranchised and technically stateless. Without representation in Israeli politics, the Palestinians in conflict zones like the West Bank can easily come to support terrorist organizations as their only hope for economic and political liberation. Hamas is another controversial political organization with a primary agenda of Palestinian nationalism. The relationship between Hamas and Fatah has been variable over the years, but is ongoing, as White points out. Unlike Hezbollah, Hamas is Sunni. Their primary locus of control is the Gaza Strip. Whereas Fatah has largely derived its support from the West Bank and has had a divergent agenda in the past, the two groups recently attempted to ally themselves in a common anti-Israeli goal. The United States has traditionally been on friendlier terms with Fatah, but White shows that both Fatah and Hamas are radicalized. Conclusion Terrorism remains an unfortunate tactic in the ongoing struggle for Palestinian recognition and liberation. Because of the use of terrorism as a core tactic, groups like Hamas, Fatah, and Hezbollah have largely lost credibility in the international community. There are no legitimate political organizations to take their place, rendering the peace process in the Middle East moot. Also unfortunate has been the formal Israeli response to terrorism. Israeli counterterrorist policies have been interpreted as state-sponsored terrorism. To better understand the conflict, it is helpful to understand the origins and background of terrorism and how it is used as a political tactic. Therefore, this chapter in White's Terrorism and Homeland Security adds context, depth, and breath to…

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Media in Other Places

Media in Other Countries Many countries around the world have become more and more generally permissive as to what is allowed to be aired and broadcast in the media sphere. Notable example areas of this in motion are the United States, Canada and much or Europe. However, one area of the world that has fought against this increased openness and permissiveness tooth and nail is the Middle East, and Saudi Arabia is certainly no exception. There have been glimmers of said permissiveness and expansion in what is acceptable, but in a society (like Saudi Arabia's) that notoriously anti-open in terms of media and what can be said, there has been a large amount of blowback. The Kraidy article covered in this report has many corollaries to the very similar Tomlinson treatise. Kraidy, like Tomlinson, posited that public space is the public arena of ideas, media and brand preferences that are allowed to permeate (or that permeate anyway even with the resistance) the public sphere of influence. This perspective and world is kept very closed in Saudi Arabia and countries like it. Not all countries that do this are Muslim, so it would be specious (and perhaps even bigoted) to suggest that. Some corners of the United States, as an extreme example, are very intolerant of outside influences and media. Kraidy View of Public Space The Kraidy article takes a very similar tangent but its focus is clearly on Saudi Arabia and the supposed/alleged infringement and violation of the local cultures by Western influence. This invasion of culture and permissiveness is view by a Moroccan noted on page 345 of the Kraidy article as a pollution of the local authentic culture and the integration of non-local capitalist and other cultural influence muddies the waters and leads to an elimination of the local culture. Interestingly, the Moroccan who made the statement did not focus on Morocco itself, but rather the wider Arab world. Also, the person who made the statement was a woman. Such a statement from a woman (either for or against Western influence) would likely not be paid a second thought if it came from a European or American source, but for a woman to be that vocal about anything Arab is a bit eyebrow-raising. This is not because she's a woman but because women are rarely so outspoken in the Arab world. it's not a bad thing that she…

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Arab-Israeli Conflict Tensions Between Israel and Palestinians

Arab-Israeli Conflict Tensions between Israel and Palestinians have been of great concern to the rest of the world ever since they began, in 1947. In that year, Great Britain, who governed the area as a protectorate and with the approval of the United Nations (Bennis, 1997), partitioned the land so that both Palestinians and Israelis could live in what was then called Palestine. This action was taken as a response to the Holocaust of World War II. World powers felt that Jewish people needed a homeland, and some Jews had been quietly moving to Palestine for some years. These "Zionists" believed they had an historical claim to the land, but the Palestinians currently living there viewed it as theirs, and they had been there for quite some time as well. HISTORY What looked to the United Nations and Great Britain as helping to right what had been a great wrong to the Jews looked like a colonial land grab to the Palestinians (Friedman, 2002). Arab countries recall the founding of the Islamic religion the way Americans might talk about the Civil War, as fairly recent history. The Arabs of the region knew that their influence had dominated most of Asia, large parts of Africa, and even into parts of Spain. In the process they had developed a system of government the blended religion and law together and that grew into a sophisticated form of government, one that tried to be tolerant of the religion as well as the cultures they had conquered (Ismael, 1999). European powers, however, had been alarmed by the spread of Islam, especially Spain. Arab rule peaked in the 10th century, and Europe responded with two crusades into Arab lands in the 11th and 125th centuries, with both religious and economic goals. The Crusaders wanted what they called "The Holy Land" under Christian rule and Western domination, and believed this to be God's will. Having a mandate from God justified extreme actions, and the battles were bloody and horrific. Europe also wanted an economic and secure route to the Far East to obtain such things as silk and spices. Unfortunately for the Arabs, while Europe attacked them from the East, Mongols from Asia attacked them from the West. Only Egypt was spared from repeated warfare (Ismael, 1999). While the Crusades are often treated in Western history as a curiosity, in Arab memory the Crusades brought down one…

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Israel Explanation of the Issue:

With both sides of the equation being labeled as both victim and perpetrator, it becomes difficult to propose sensible national security policies. The securitization process of Israel has been recently built on the labeling mechanism. Labeling Palestinians with the blanket term of "terrorist" has become the major means by which Israel garners domestic and international support through the media and…

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Effects of Zionism on the Peace Process Between Israel and the Palestinians

¶ … Zionism on the peace process between Israel and Palestinians brief history and forms of Zionism Brief history of Jewish way to the own state Creating an own state - Israel The history of Israeli territory Arab anti-Semitism and conflicts When talking about such complicated and very uneasy question as Zionism is, we have to research the process during…

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Post WWII

¶ … conflicts between Arabs and the Israelis in the Middle East. Specifically, it will discuss the conflicts in the Middle East, and answer some questions about my vision of forging a lasting peace in the area. The Arab-Israeli conflicts began almost as soon as the Israelis settled in the new nation of Israel after World War II, and they…

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Israeli Palestinian Conflict and the Middle East

International Politics The Threat of Terrorism the Context of International Relations between the U.S. And the Middle East The threat of terrorism in the U.S. is inextricably linked to the events in the Middle East and the perceived role of the U.S. many of those events; especially in the Israeli/Palestinian disputes. The U.S. is a major power and the country has not been afraid to use that power in international relations. It is the way that the power has been used, often for the support of Israel, to the detriment of Arabic nations. To appreciate this one can look at the way in which the U.S. has supported Israel, this was seen with the 'friendship' formed between Kennedy and David Ben-Gurion (Bass 2). Building ion the foundation laid by Kennedy, other presidents extended the relationship (Bass 5). It was rumored that during the Six Day War in 1967 Lyndon B. Johnson supplied the Israelis with arms, although this has been denied. More conclusive evidence of support for Israelis seen when, during the Yom Kippur War in 1973, the U.S. did supply arms to the Israelis following the early successes of the Syrian and Egyptian forces who were seeking to regain land they had previously lost to Israel. When this support of Israel is placed into the context of the founding of the country; an artificially created state which saw the United Nations portioning land from the area known as Palestine for the homing of Jewish immigrants, the interference can be seen as an extension of the west support for the Jewish state against the Arab States. For those who had been in the region for many generations, and saw land take, first by their UN and then by the fighting of the Israelis, to gain more land, the support from the U.S. was an unwelcome interference, hindering their own interests. The U.S. was not only active in supporting Israel, power has been used to support its own interests, such as the aid given to Iraq in the Iran/Iraq war; a war that resulted in the loss of approximately 1 million lives, one may ask why the U.S. choose to interfere and if that interference helped to prolong the a war and increase loss of life. The first and second Gulf Wars were also examples of the power of the U.S., at the time it was argued that the invasions were…

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Palestine How Would You Feel

However, when they felt that Palestine was not taking this seriously, they reversed their steps which paved way for yet another failed effort (Erin, 143) The Road Map for Peace was an agreement designed by America, EU, UN and Russia. All the countries agreed for the formation of an independent state of Palestine. It was the first one in which…

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Arab-Israeli Conflict the Genesis of the Arab-Israeli

Arab-Israeli Conflict The genesis of the Arab-Israeli conflict predated the 1948 creation of the modern state of Israel. Ottoman colonialism had scarred the Middle East for centuries. During World War One, French and especially British intervention in the region exacerbated an already heated conflict between Arabs and Jews in Palestinian region. The political trend toward nationalism also encouraged the Zionist ideology. Zionism began as a loosely organized grassroots movement in Europe during the late nineteenth century that encouraged Jews in Diaspora to claim a homeland territory in Palestine. Zionism was not a universal theme among Jews, and in fact many Jews living in Palestine and abroad opposed the creation of a modern Israeli nation-state (Beinin & Hajjar). The primary impetus of Zionism was to create a political nation-state with distinct geographic boundaries in Palestine. The new nation would encompass ancient Jewish territories including those regions and cities held sacred by both Muslims and Jews. As early as 1882, Jews in Europe began to migrate en masse to Palestine (Beinin & Hajjar). During the First World War Zionism became embedded in British foreign policy, arguably as a means to assert European political hegemony. The Allied victory completed the fall of the Ottoman Empire, and the entire Middle East fell under the control of France and Great Britain. The 1917 Balfour Declaration issued by Great Britain became the first official Zionist policy initiative. The Balfour Declaration represented part of the way Great Britain would carve up its Middle Eastern territories: with little regard for the will of the Arab people. Great Britain and France essentially took advantage of a fragmented Arab population, which had been living under Turkish Ottoman rule and which had yet to establish any clear nationalist policies. The dismantling of the Ottoman Empire enabled European political intervention in the Middle East and the creation of what can easily be called artificial political boundaries throughout the region. Moreover, a growing market for fossil fuels created an important financial and political impetus for European interventionism in the Middle East. Jews and Arabs had been coexisting in the Palestinian region throughout the Diaspora but Arabs far outnumbered both Jews and Turks in the region. Zionism threatened Arab sovereignty, limiting the amount of self-determination Arabs had in the wake of World War One. The influx of Jews into the region, which was officially supported and sponsored by Great Britain, led to civic unrest…

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Israel International Politics Case Study on Terrorism

ISRAEL Locked in a history of persecution, religious discrimination, and national consciousness, the Jewish people were granted their own land when, following World War II, the British withdrew from Palestine and the United Nations divided the war-torn land into two separate states. The UN created an Arab state and a Jewish state, Israel, against tremendous rejection by the Arabs, who…

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UAE the Global Village it

To achieve a higher SOL in the near future, the global village will have to currently save more (Mankiw, 2004). Abu Dhabi plans on investing a total of Dh555 billion in the upcoming 5 years, of which, Dh320 billion will be allocated to construction, Dh120 to the development of the tourism industry, and a total of Dh80 billion on seeking…

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Arab Spring: The Political Movement

Hosni Mubarak was also tried in court in August, the same year, for the responsibility of the dead protestors in the revolution. The following month, the military announced that parliament's election will be help in November which will be followed by elections for the new president. The military would still be in charge after the elections to ensure that the right democracy sets in and the parliament would thus be answerable to the military till the time that the new constitution and government was in place and functioning well. This transition of governance was anticipated to continue till 2013. Yet, even nearing the end of 2013, Egypt's future and governance still seems to be unclear (Aa, 2011). Arab Spring and terrorism activity in Egypt The overall impact and conclusions from the first election since the revolution in Egypt are clear indications of what is in store. The Islamic communities in the country have increased their popularity and thus are experiencing more power in the region. This is primarily so because most Muslim communities like the 'Muslim Brotherhood' are strong advocates of democracy and the ending of the tyrannous rule of the Egyptian military. On the other hand, creating havoc seems to be part of the agenda for groups like 'Muslim Brotherhood' so as to serve their hidden or ulterior interests. The Muslim Brotherhood has also been accused of bribing the locals in the election to attain votes from the locals which does not encourage a very democratic stance. It was February 11 when Mubarak resigned and the West-supported Egyptian military took over, however the purpose with which the revolution began seems to be lost again as the hunger for power overcomes the demand for democracy. This could lead to increased tensions and breeding grounds for terrorism (Lutterbeck, 2013). Impact of the Arab Spring on the state and non-state sponsored terrorism in Egypt It is no secret that the U.S. has double standards when it comes to democracy i.e. defending democratic structure for their own people and denying it to nations around the world like Israel and Palestine. It is the Arab Spring and the string of revolutions in it that is challenging this approach to democracy and the double standards of the West. The Arab world has lost faith in the ways and policies of the West due to recent failed implementations and thus the Arab world seems to be…

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US Israel Relations Specifically Oslo Accords

U.S. / Israel Relations Israel Relations the Oslo Accords Since the end of World War II, the Arab Israeli conflict has been increasingly brought to the forefront. As U.S. foreign policy has continued to focus on addressing this underlying conflict that has been taking place. Part of the reason for this, was because of the continued state of war that…

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David Ben-Gurion's Changing Views Towards Arab Nationalism Between 1918 and 1948

¶ … Nuanced Face of Zionism It is hard to think of the words "Middle East" and "nuance" as having anything to do with each other -- much less to conceive of a nuanced position between Zionism and Arab nationalism. But there have been times in the decades since the founding of the state of Israel that political leaders have…

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American Foreign Policy Towards the Middle East Under Obama

Israelis and Palestinians do not have to keep fighting and killing each other forever. But it sometimes seems that they do. While there are places in the world in which the possible of a functional polity are far more distant (such as Somalia), it is fundamentally difficult to imagine a world in which Palestinians, Arabs, and Israelis beat their swords…

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British Mandate of Palestine

¶ … British Mandate of Palestine. Specifically it will compare and contrast the conflicts of that time with the conflicts of today, and any similarities and laws that apply. The British Mandate of Palestine occurred after the fall of the Ottoman Empire after the First World War. Under the Mandate, Britain ruled Palestine until 1948, and it was during this…

Pages: 4  |  Thesis  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 4


Arab-Israeli Conflict and the Peace Process

¶ … Arab-Israeli Conflict. Specifically it will discuss diplomacy regarding the Arab-Israeli conflict during the period December 1968 - September 1973. The Arab-Israeli Conflict has been an ongoing dispute regarding the creation of the Israeli state after World War II in 1948, but it really began much before that occurrence. In reality, the Arab-Israeli Conflict began with an upsurge of…

Pages: 10  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4


Similarities Between the State-Led Economic Policies of South Korea and Israel

State-led Economic Policies in South Korea and Israel Without doubt, the 1960s represent the main time frame in which South Korea and Israel laid the framework for future economic prosperity. Not only that, the most torrid economic development occurred at this time. The most critical propellant of this prosperity, of which will be the primary topic of this paper, was the state-led policy linkages shared between South Korea and Israel. Discussion will be limited to the 1960s because this decade predated nearly twenty years of economic decline for both nations, and also because of the above-mentioned reasons. Further exploration of this intervention will focus on government financing, investment, and the use of economic nationalism. In light of the economic development that both nations experienced in the 1960s, the hardships that both South Korea and Israel endured during this time must be mentioned if only to highlight the true wonder of their expansion. The 1960s saw Israel affected by the most constrictive period of the Arab Boycott, which prevented Arab states from importing goods and services originating from Israel. This had deprived Israel of many possible local trading partners. During the 1960s, Israel spent 9% of its GDP on defense initiatives aimed at keeping its regional enemies at bay, far more military spending than most other developing nations. Finally, Israel had to cope with the massive influx of immigrants who doubled Israel's population within the decade. Considering the greater emphasis Israel placed on welfare when compared to South Korea, expenditures on housing, food, and education for these immigrants placed a huge strain on the Israeli economy. As for South Korea, its people lived under the repressive military dictatorship of General Park Chung-hee while also reeling from the destruction of the Korean War. In addition, a scarcity of natural resources contributed to a national per capita income in 1960 of $80 (CIA, 2008). To counter these deficiencies, both nations exploited a reality that was unique to themselves among other developing nations, in that each state was able to form a cohesive national identity. Each population has a longstanding history with their own singular historical narrative. With this unity at their disposal, each respective government was capable of pursuing a nationalist economic agenda. Burdened with the responsibility of sustaining Israel's newly acquired existence, the government sought to oversee the fruition of industrializing their economy away from the stagnant and once dominant dependency upon…

Pages: 3  |  Term Paper  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 0


1967 Arab-Israeli War

¶ … mistreated for their beliefs. This has been apparent within the last century due to the fact that many as six million Jews were murdered in the Holocaust. From there, religious conflicts have continued in Israel and the Middle East. It is common knowledge that the cause of the conflict between the Jews and Arabs over their homeland that…

Pages: 10  |  Term Paper  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 15


Israel Internal Security Case Study

Israel Internal Security Case Study Nature of the state Israel is a young nation, developed following WWII, when Britain withdrew from Palestine and the United Nations partitioned a portion of it for the resettlement of displaced Jews following the war. Arab nations in the region and Palestine itself rejected the arrangement, but it was followed through with nonetheless. The arrangement…

Pages: 15  |  Case Study  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 30


Novel Palestine

Palestine BY SACCO Palestine by Joe Sacco is a unique narrative because it is based on author's first hand knowledge of the conflict and comes in the form of comic strip. Sacco makes a strong case against Israel. It must be made clear from the onset that this book favor Palestine and Arabs and not the Jews. The author is speaking for a people who cannot speak for himself as he jokingly tells us that, "These guys could use the services of a good public relations officer!" It is obvious from the book that the author feels for the Palestinians who became victims of Israeli aggression simply because they refused to share their land with them. It was Palestine's land to begin with. Sacco spent two months in Palestine at the end of first uprising. The nine issues of his comics were published in a book form and according to Edward Said, this accessible form matches the "political and aesthetic work of extraordinary originality." Said maintains that apart from one or two other writes, "no one has ever rendered this terrible state of affairs better than Joe Sacco." Terrible is not the right word, however, for the state of affairs discussed by Sacco in the book. There is some gruesome about the images and they contrast sharply with the other jovial mood of the 'normal' world outside. This is a conflict you can never truly understand as an outsider. It is grounded in years of severe hatred that almost seems irrational. But it is not- not at least to the people involved. The western media doesn't tell us the truth and while we see Palestinian youth throwing stones and hurling things at Israeli tankers but you may fail to understand why this is happening. It appears almost bizarre to a western eye but it makes absolute sense to the people living in these conflict-ridden region. Sacco has talked to people to find out how they feel about the conflict and is shocked at their naked hatred for the Israeli.……

Pages: 2  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Arab-Israeli Wars

Arab-Israeli Wars Palestinian and Arab views on the Middle East conflicts and the Israeli views could not have been more in conflict over the last several decades. As many of the post second world war conflicts have had as cause, the colonial footprint of the "great powers," has left a severe mark on the Middle Eastern region, particularly because of…

Pages: 5  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5

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