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Stress Management an Organization Starts Its Operation

Stress Management An organization starts its operation with certain objectives in mind. The management of the organization adopts certain strategies and initiatives that contribute toward attainment of the objectives. The objectives shape the external policies of the company, external policy includes interaction and dealing with public, suppliers, governments, competitors, and taxation departments. The core of the external policy is the…

Pages: 8  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 5


Mbo for Managing an Organization What Impact,

¶ … MBO for Managing an Organization What impact, if any, does the level of management have to do with how information is disseminated, how people interact with management, and how decisions are made? Explain. Management sets the tone for everything done within a company. They decide how information will be shared: email, memorandum, formal level, informational meeting, or discussion meaning? Management that views information as a top-down process will tend to use one-sided communication, where management speaks and the rest of the employees listen. In a less authoritarian style of management, information will flow multiple ways - from top to bottom, bottom to top, and from the middle in both directions. Describe a project in which you have participated either as a project manager or team member. What did you do (or the project manager do) to manage this project effectively? Analyze the success of the project based on what you have learned about planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. I was team leader for a new computer application. Once I learned the program, I was the contact person for about 20 other people and helped them learn to implement the program efficiently and well. In this role I communicated with the people learning the program but also the people above me who were in charge of the overall implementation. I found that I had to call the people I was supposed to be assisting. They were pushed for time and would tend to invent their own work-arounds rather than asking how the program should function. In addition to aiding those people, I reported this pattern to those above me, not as criticism of those I was helping train but so the people in overall charge would be aware that some people……

Pages: 2  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Management & Organizational Behavior Management and Organizational

Management & Organizational Behavior Management and Organizational Behavior Using the Management Skill Set Assessment by Alan Chapman an analysis has been completed comparing my self-assessment to my immediate manager's perception of my performance on the 22 factors that comprise this framework. 13 of the factors were classified as a level factors, seven as B. factors and 2 as C. factors. Across the entire set of 22 factors, the average score of the rankings I gave myself was 8.36 and my supervisor's was 6.86. This difference of approximately 1.5 points across all factors held consistent across all three categories of factors (a, B and C). The greatest variation however was in the C. class of factors with a deviation of 2 in the average scores (8.75 versus 6.75). What is most interesting is the alignment of factors into the a, B and C. sectors of the analysis. The intent of this analysis is to evaluate the totality of these rankings to determine what lessons can be learned for continual improvement. Analysis of a-Level Factors There are four skills in the a level of factors that exhibited the greatest variation between my own assessments vs. that of my manager. They are shown below in the red zone of the graphic titled Figure 1, a-Level Factors Analysis. Figure 1: A-Level Factors Analysis The yellow section of Figure 1: A-Level Factors Analysis shows that group of five factors where the difference is attributable by up to two differences in ratings, and the green section are the a-level factors my manager and I are in agreement on. This is a useful approach to analyzing the data as it provides insights into how much my manager sees me needing to improve on taking initiative to motivate others while also gaining greater leadership. As our company is heavily focused on quality management standards, there is also the critical need to provide leadership on these standards while also providing motivation to team members to stay focused on quality management and compliance. My manager also believes I need to also take a more active role in innovation and problem solving, and he would like to see me do this by engaging with other team members more often. When I asked my manager about these 13 factors and his rankings, he mentioned that my performance of the core functions of management continue to be excellent. These include planning, organizing, leading…

Pages: 2  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Change Management & Organizational Transformation Change Management

Change Management & Organizational Transformation CHANGE Management and ORGANIZATIONAL TRANSFORMATION The objective of this work is to examine changes in organizations, management and how management and technology are more frequently becoming factors for consideration. This work will select a company and analyze the status of organizational transformation and change management, and identify key organizational transformation and change management issues currently…

Pages: 20  |  Thesis  |  Style: Chicago  |  Sources: 15


Management for Organizations

Industries Management for Organizations Often thought to be the heart and soul of this nation's economy, businesses within the manufacturing industry produce every day, ordinary goods on an enormous level. These businesses characteristically partake in very labor intensive productions and employ a great number of people, who are in effect the farmers of industrialization. Labor Unions, raw materials, up-and-coming markets,…

Pages: 8  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 8


Functions of Management A. Organization the Planning

Functions of Management a. Organization The planning function in an organization refers to "the future impact of today's decisions." This includes everything from providing a mission for the company, setting strategic goals and defining the means by which these goals can be achieved. The planning function defines the trend the company will be following on a short- and long-term. In the case of the American College, the planning function includes remaining a top competitor (as a strategic objective) and developing the means by which this objective can be reached. The organizing function establishes "the internal organizational structure of the business." This means that the American College designs the right organization chart that will serve most efficiently and that will work best with the current human resources. The organization function also works perfectly with the planning function, because, while the planning function designs the ways of action at a large scale, the organization function will handle the tactical details of how they should be carried out. How can financial stability and accurate tuition fees be maintained? Directing or leading refers to ways in which the human resource is mobilized to make most out of the positions they work in. Motivation is a key element in the directing function, as is the vision that a leader needs to provide. In the case of the American College, the vision relies in the planning function and its strategic objective: providing an OPPORTUNITY for students, an opportunity of learning. The employees at American College, besides financial motivation, have the sheer satisfaction of their palpable and real success. Finally, the controlling feedback involves a concrete and diverse feedback mechanism by which the way the decisions that the management makes and are implemented is evaluated and new ways of action are designed to cope with changes. In our case, for example, any change in price must be reflected and adjusted, as a reactive action to change. Additionally, control mechanisms, including financial ratio and a keen eye on the annual statements, are in place in order to ensure the fulfillment of one of the strategic goals, the financial stability of the company. b. Supervisor If in the organization's case, everything was at macro levels, the supervisor function transposes the four functions of management at division or lower levels. In this sense, the planning function refers, first of all, to financial stability in the department. In this sense, the…

Pages: 3  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Change Management an Organizational Change

Once stakeholders' interests and links to the change initiative have been identified, the owners can chart an engagement strategy (Austin, 2009). The engagement strategy outlines the timing, order and actions for connecting with key stakeholders (Austin, 2009). The plan will be implemented by determining which stakeholders need to be approached before the change becomes public and determining if some need…

Pages: 8  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 6


Information Technologies Information Management, Knowledge

StepTwo's contribution however was significant in the RTA project, integrating the electronic and manual content together into a unified system. Making Knowledge Accessibility and Automation More Effective In both case studies, the companies involved faced major challenges and difficulties in getting their knowledge management and content management systems' content available to users. This is a very common problem with knowledge management and content management systems as has been covered in class readings and lectures. Of the two cases, StepTwo also had the daunting task of getting manual content translated into electronic form so it could be more easily used and accessible over time. Making content accessible across the entire company in both cases was extremely difficult in the beginning due to a lack of integration as well, a point seen in the Frito Lay example and how database and systems integration was pivotal there. Change Management This is an area that is a weakness in the composition of both case studies quite frankly. While both cases shown a clear definition of how the "internal customer" is for the system, it is hard to believe people will change how they work and adopt a system just from looking at a brochure. It is also exceptionally difficult to get outside sales teams, many of which work remotely, to change how they are doing their daily jobs without an added incentive. This area of the case studies show how systems are often designed by senior management and given to employees to use, as was the case with StepTwo, and how critical it is for senior management the champion change and also be willing to change how they work as well as part of system adoption. Frito Lay adopting the system in remote sales teams required their input and ownership; a point downplayed in the case study but clearly in place as the adoption was successful. Comparing and contrasting each case study's solutions In analyzing each case study, they share these common attributes. First both focus on users often throughout the requirement process. Second, both solutions are architected to be platform agnostic and process centric, a good decision that opens up greater flexibility in defining a solution later. Third, both are focused on knowledge interpretation. While neither of the case studies say this explicitly it is evident in the approach of StepTwo using Delphi and Frito Lay using Business Objects to interpolate data. This…

Pages: 3  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Behavior Management and Organizational Behavior -- the

¶ … Behavior Management and Organizational Behavior -- the Organizational Culture The organizational culture is an emblem of each economic agent and it directly impacts the company's chances of succeeding. The organizational culture impacts the firm at each level and is felt -- in one way or another -- by each individual employee, as well as by each member of the stakeholder categories -- such as clients, business partners, the general public, governmental institutions, not-for-profit agencies and so on. The specialized literature presents the manager and the general reader with a wide array of models of organizational behavior, but fact remains that the leader cannot implement a model from the textbook and expect it to work. And this is even more so applicable in a context in which some books, such as Corporate Cultures: The Rites and Rituals of Corporate Life, do not present the reader with models, but with concepts of organizational culture and issues to be taken into consideration in the construction and assessment of an organizational culture. Author Allan a. Kennedy: "Our original purpose in writing the book was to get the subject of culture on the management agenda and to sensitize managers to its importance" (Richman, 1999). The manager will as such have to devise his own model of organizational culture, based on the specifics of the entity he represents. In this order of ideas, the executive team at TUIU has also made its decision of implementing a Denison culture model based on the higher level of correspondence between model features and organizational requirements. The executive team at TUIU initially looked at three models, as follows: The Deal and Kennedy's Cultural Model The Competing Values Framework, and the Denison Model. Each of these models is characterized by its own features, which make it applicable within specific organizational contexts. The lines below present the main features of these three models. Also, the differences which are observed indicate why TUIU has chosen the Denison model. The Deal and Kennedy Model of organizational culture is centered on the identification of four different "types of organization, based on how quickly they receive feedback and reward after they have done something and the level of risks that they take" (Changing Minds). These four cultures are: Work hard and play hard culture, in which the reward and feedback are quick, and the risk is low Tough-guy macho culture, in which the feedback…

Pages: 2  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Management and Organizational Behavior Analysis How a

Management and Organizational Behavior Analysis How a Military Unit is like a Symphony The parallels between a military unit and a symphony are many, especially when the aspects of how both function as living organisms that must stay internally synchronized yet interact with other entities to survive and thrive. The essence of any effective organization is the ability to stay agile enough to respond to internal needs but me stable enough to integrate with other organizational organisms (Schneider, 2000). The intent of this analysis is to evaluate how each of these organizational organisms are comparable to each other. Comparing a Military Unit and Symphony Both have unique organizational structures that define their cultures, all supporting their mission, values and objectives. For the military unit, the small span of control within battalions, platoons and in the smallest unit, squads, defines how closely aligned each role in the organism must be to these guiding factors of mission and objectives. Comparably structured yet with a broader span of control, symphonies also have organizational structures that are specifically designed to enable each section to be at once unified yet separate enough to complete their tasks. This loose-tight coupling of a structure is essential for the socio-economic value of any organizational organism to be attained (Allee, 2009). In addition, this structure is also critically important for creating the necessary agility and resilience that gives the organization the ability to withstand significant change over time (Noruzi, Hernandez, 2010). Both military units and symphonies need to anticipate change and devise approaches to enabling greater internal synchronization within departments as well. A symphony creates value and gains critical acclaim for how well the conductor and managers can create a very high level of synchronization or synergy. The same holds true for a military officer and their ability to create cooperation, collaboration and a consistent response organism wide to the goals and objectives of the unit. The most galvanizing aspects of these two organizations is that both can earn accolades on how well diverse teams are orchestrated and have a real-time level of communication and trust that translates into accomplishment. Trust that permeates an organizational culture acts as an accelerator, a catalyst of unification and consistency (Schneider, 2000). Without trust, organisms implode and often face atrophy as they will not have the ability to be fueled by interactions and input of fresh ideas. The socio-economic aspects of each organization…

Pages: 3  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Management and Organizational Structure

Management Theory Organizational structure: Sara Lee Corporation Sara Lee Corporation Sara Lee is a world-renowned corporation. It is famous for its trusted, tested products, including Ball Park hot dogs, Hillshire Farm meats, Jimmy Dean sausages Sanex, Senseo and of course Sara Lee desserts (About Sara Lee, 2010, Sara Lee). The Sara Lee Corporation is international in its scope, and its output encompasses many types of products, although it focuses upon home-related items such as foods and skin cleansers. Traditional centralized structure: Three problems and proposed solution In a traditional, hierarchical firm structure (which characterizes Sara Lee at present), individuals are in charge of certain, specific products and functions: for example, the Sara Lee brand's operations in a particular region of the United States are always under the centralized control of top management. The advantage of a traditional structure is quality control: with a trusted brand like Sara Lee, there are high customer expectations which must be met to ensure repeat purchases. Customers must believe that Sara Lee and its signature products maintain the quality and flavor profile their mothers enjoyed. However, Sara Lee as an entity has changed over the years. Given that it is more international in focus, communication problems could result between different divisions regarding regional tastes. For example, an individual in charge of UK operations might realize that British consumers are not as enamored with peanut butter or vanilla-flavored items, but the centralized command of the company back in the U.S. might be more convinced, based upon strong sales of such items in the past in the U.S., by his or her data 'on hand,' rather than the impressions of someone lower on the organizational hierarchy. Centralized structures can also be alienating. If workers do not feel that their input is valued by company leaders, they may begin to simply do the minimum to 'get by' in the company, rather than make an investment of time, energy, and loyalty. The company can lose critical input from lower levels of the company that could improve organizational efficiency. Centralized structures can also lack flexibility. If there are sudden changes, such as a sharp drop or rise in demand, having to seek approval from a centralized authority can make the organization less responsive. For example, a certain amount of autonomy for regional managers may be required to adjust product orders because of sudden heat waves or snow storms, or to…

Pages: 4  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Management Theory Organizational Behavior Management Theory Article

Management Theory Organizational Behavior Management Theory Article Review Scavenger Hunt Psychology Wilpert, B. (1995). Organizational behavior. In his review of organizational behavior and psychology, Wilpert (1995) reviews subjects pertinent to the field of psychology and organizational behavior and leadership, including language, technology, leadership and social constructs created in the workforce using a multivariate analysis approach. On reviewing theoretical developments in…

Pages: 5  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 5


Management and Organizational Behavior What Are the

Management and Organizational Behavior What are the Greatest Impediments to Successful Product Development? The intent of this essay is to provide insights into the greatest impediments that organizations face in successful new product development. There are many challenges to defining, designing, prototyping and producing products, yet the greatest impediment of all is when an organization becomes too complacent, even lazy, in terms of listening to customers. This lack of the Voice of the Customer is a major reason many organizations go out of business, they quite being relevant to their prospects and customers. Complacency kills companies faster than anything else, because it robs them of their ability to bring new products, new services, and in short, a reason for customers to continually turn to them for solutions. One of the second major impediments to organizations completing successful product development is a lack of accountability and process definition in engineering, new product development, and product design. This lack of accountability and lack of processes manifest themselves with schedules that are unrealistic, rarely if……

Pages: 1  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Hight Performance Management

High Performance Management Accomplishing Organizational Goals according Total Quality Management Given the importance of effective management in any type of organization today, the recent attention paid to management initiatives such as the ISO 9000 series and the total quality movement approach embody a single primary component: the producers of products and services must achieve the highest attainable quality; in fact, nothing short of this less will succeed in an increasingly globalized and competitive environment. Consequently, the two past few years have witnessed the rise of a philosophy that has been aimed at maximizing organizational quality. The use of existing world standards for quality control, such as the standards in the ISO 9000 series, can provide almost any type of organizations with the tools it requires to achieve these goals, but there are some constraints to the process that must be resolved before the maximum benefits of such approaches can be realized. These comprehensive and extensive standards are characterized by fundamental differences in product categories and sectors, but all of these provide important general quality control principles for all types of products and services today. Without a doubt, the current trend toward making do with less to accomplish more is clear, and ISO 9000 quality systems standards or their equivalent have been adopted in more than 90 countries as national standards. In this regard, compliance with the comprehensive ISO 9000 standards has become less obligatory for businesses that want sell medical devices or telecommunications equipment in Europe, where more than 20,000 companies are registered. In the U.S., suppliers to the electrical, chemical, and nuclear industries are anticipating certification has also become mandatory (Barnes, 1998). Furthermore, managers have not been isolated from these trends and the number of ISO 9000 registrations is doubling every nine to 12 months in the U.S., from 100 in 1990 to 4000 in 1994 (Barnes, 1998). Despite these trends, it is important for managers at every level to recognize that successful TQM outcomes make it possible to more efficiently use an organization's resources by ensuring the optimal allocation of tasks, processes, and responsibilities within the concept of accountability. Consequently, every aspect of the business's operation that serves to contribute to quality within the organization is differentiated, and to the extent possible, improved. To accomplish this broad goal, a TQM system can apply a company's resources to operate in union with improved efficiency in satisfying customer needs and…

Pages: 4  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Production Management the Organization That We Are

Production Management The organization that we are talking about is a manufacturer of engineering products, and the major part of the work seems to be assembling different items into a final product. The function concerned is called in management terms as production management. The most important part of the capacity of a production manager is the ability to balance risks and costs. The duty of the production manager is to keep a track of the involved costs on a regular basis. (Production Management) In this relevant case we have to prepare the job schedules in a detailed manner and for that purpose nowadays there are many different varieties of computer programs which are being available for use. Yet even before finally deciding upon which program or method need to be utilized for the purpose, one has to study about the entire procedure in a most detailed manner. Of the many systems that are suitable to the situation described, what is most important to know is that results may be different through the use of different systems. The concerned matter is the flow of goods and the flow of goods can be considered in two ways - either that the goods are being forced ahead through production in one process to the next process. In this method, production is planned in a manner through which produced goods are prepared at one level and then pushed ahead to the next production process whether the next process needs the goods or not. (Manufacturing in the New Millennium) Let us understand this further by taking the case of the finished power platforms and these will be prepared and will be sent on to the next proceeding stage, even if whether they are needed over……

Pages: 2  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Conflict in Organizations Conflict Management in Organizations

Conflict in Organizations Conflict Management in Organizations Conflict within an organization is not necessarily bad, and can act as a powerful catalyst to move a company forward to its objectives, overcoming both market limitations and competitors in the process. The sources of conflict within an organization can be behavioral, organizational and structural with a lack of goal clarity and communication often accelerating differences. Human Resource (HR) professionals need to champion the transfer of conflict management skills to each level of an organization to ensure that the skills and insights needed become engrained in the company's culture (Guttman, 2009). Analyzing Conflict Management Strategies Each organization needs to have a core set of conflict management skills, insights and programs in place that are regularly taught to each management layer of the company (Dionne, Yammarino, Atwater, Spangler, 2004). HR needs to champion the development and teaching of active listening techniques, support for assertiveness training, and depersonalizing exercises to ensure that managers and staff have a strong inventory if techniques to draw from (Guttman, 2009). Yet HR cannot do this alone, they need to have the support of leaders throughout the organization for conflict management initiatives and techniques to be effective. The ownership of conflict management needs to be with the senior management teams, each layer of management and throughout the supervisory ranks of the organization (Guttman, 2009). One of the most effective approaches to managing conflict is to invest in leadership training programs that seek to grow the transformational leaders who have the ability to manage conflict effectively through communication and emotional intelligence-based insights (Carmeli, Atwater, Levi, 2011). The combining of HR expertise and transformational leadership is very effective for minimizing disruptions from conflict while also preserving the development of effective leadership strategies at the same time. This shared aspect……

Pages: 2  |  Case Study  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Defining Organizational Learning

Management Theory Organizational Learning In the business community, learning is much more than just a manner in which to create the future that is desired. In today's quick-paced, highly aggressive work world, it may in fact give a company the edge it needs to survive and thus keep fulfilling its purpose. Organizations flourish to adjust incessantly to external conditions as well as highlight internal hierarchical decisions that are needed for change. Therefore, organizations persistently tend to balance the learning process between equilibrium and evolution in order to achieve success (Chatterjee, 2010). Organizational learning necessitates systematic incorporation and collective interpretation of new knowledge that leads to collective action and involves risk taking as testing. Systems behavior is affected by environment with both internal and external factors being at play. A system's assessment of the relation between its purpose and its behavior is determined by the stability of representations and views that determines the behavior of the learning system. This stability of representations and perceptions are brought about by some lasting changes induced by learning where rules stay in balance as long as the learning system is unmoved. "If the rules are changed contemporaneously, it would be difficult to ascertain the outcomes of a learning process" (Chatterjee, 2010. Adaptive learning is related to reasonableness, protective relationships, and low freedom of choice and dissuasion of inquiry while generative learning requires five disciplines: personal mastery, mental molds, shared vision, team learning and systemic thinking (Chiva, Grandio, & Alegre, 2010). Internal factors or environment of a business consists of the organizational resources accessible to achieve its goals. These normally include human, technological, financial and physical resources. The task of management is to obtain these resources and make competent and effectual use of them inside an organization. Organizational resources are usually scarce and management success depends on how well these resources are both gotten a hold of then utilized (External and Internal Factors, n.d.). External factors include sociological, economic, political and technological aspects. The sociological aspects include the demographic status and trends, work ethics and personal values, and general cultures. These factors all have difference influences on how management gets its job done. The social environment presented in each company is unique and as each business grows and expands, management needs to understand these unique environments. "This understanding assists the management to plan for the future and design products for particular groups of people" (External and…

Pages: 3  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Octagon Sports Organizational Structure

This is where the Octagon falls, alongside IMG and others. Third, is the sports services, which involves organizations offering sports as their end products. This segment is again further divided into three facets including the Event that involves organizations generating their revenues, either indirectly or directly from spectators (Staffa, Lewis, Braham & Griffins 2011). Here, the athletes are professional, and…

Pages: 9  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


Organizational Behavior and Management Concepts Organizational Behavior

Organizational Behavior and Management Concepts Organizational Behavior Defined Generally, organizational behavior refers to the study of behavior patterns within professional business (and other) organizations (George & Jones, 2008; NAU, 2010; Robbins & Judge, 2009). It consists of three principal areas of analysis: the study of individual behavior, the study of individual behavior within a group, and the study of interrelations between and among different groups of individuals (NAU, 2010). Despite the substantial differences in the specific focus of each of those areas, all aspects of the study of organizational behavior serves the same essential purpose: to apply the knowledge gained to improve the efficiency, effectiveness, and profitability of professional business (and other) organizations (NAU, 2010). Additionally, the understanding of organizational behavior principles and practices can also be applied for the benefit of the individuals within the organizations (George & Jones, 2008; Robbins & Judge, 2009). Components of Organizational Behavior There are major distinctions within the study of organizational behavior, such as those pertaining to the respective realms of organizational effectiveness, process efficiency, personnel performance, and human motivation (George & Jones, 2008; Robbins & Judge, 2009). The roots of modern concepts of organizational effectiveness date back to the work of early industrial organization theorists such as Frederick Taylor and Henri Fayol in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Taylor, in particular, is considered the father of scientific business management because of the way he applied quantitative analyses to business processes. That approach involved, for one example, determining the optimal makeup of working groups and the ideal size of shovels for the most productive possible output……

Pages: 2  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Incorporating Knowledge Management in Organization

¶ … open economy' a 'closed economy', discuss potential economic advantages economic disadvantages a country open economy. Incorporating knowledge management at the Army National Guard G6 The military institutions have always represented the backbone of a country's security and safety system. Within the United States, they are part of the national symbols and the trusted organizations of the entire population.…

Pages: 8  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 8


Disaster Management Communications and Technology

According to a report by GSM Association (2005), mobile phones play a very significant role in facilitating disaster management irrespective of the stage. According to the report, many individuals utilise short text messages in indicating alarms of disasters whenever they need help. This is a practice t hat is not only common in Australia but also in other parts of the world. Additionally, these gadgets serve to provide information of looming disasters. The capabilities that the modern mobile phones have are of a wide range. As such multiple forms of warning information can be distributed and accessed through the mobile phones thanks to the radio, internet and other communication capabilities instituted within them (GSM Association, 2005). Because of the unique technological capabilities that most mobile phones have, these tools have been employed as instruments for recovery processes in emergency situations. During chaotic states of affairs, these technological equipments aid in the recovery process owing to the unique way in which they provide agencies and affected people with means of finding relevant information depending on their needs at the time. The use of mobile phones in disaster discovery has its own pros and cons. The advantages of these tools lie in the fact that it is able to provide a wide range of information in different means to those who need them. People can read newspapers through their phones, access televisions and radios through the same and even browse the internet and access a variety of websites through the gadgets. Additionally, the tool has been widely used as one of the most modern pre-disaster preparedness tool for providing warning to looming disasters to different entities. The fact that it can be used at both the national and the international level for disaster management can also not be disputed. For instance, in Australia, the use of mobile phones has been proactive in the advancement of the ADMIN programs both at the local and the international levels. Internationally the project uses the likes of ADMIX in facilitating international information exchange on disaster in addition to coordinating with the United National International Emergency Network (UNIENNET). The fact that mobile phones need enough power in order to facilitate its functions in disaster management however limits its capabilities with this regard. Low battery power on phones has in many cases made it impossible for the affected people and the agencies to communicate or coordinate. Furthermore, the…

Pages: 4  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4


Radical Humanist Approach to Organizational

Simply put, it is very difficult to be an ethnographer in one's own society. Critical theory is, to my thinking, superior to naturalistic inquiry with regard to the study of organizational culture due to the advantage it presents through perspective. (Freire, 1970). The difference is akin to the difference between two approaches to anthropology: Case study and participant observation. An…

Pages: 7  |  Assessment  |  Style: Harvard  |  Sources: 15


Operations and IT Management This

" (Jericho Forum, 2011, paraphrased) III. How ILM Affects Coordination and Conflicts Between Operations Managers and Information Technology Managers Since information is differentiated by the value carried and the information protection requirements of various information a method of information classification is required. The method used to classify the information is required to be "concise and clear so that it can be applied quickly and accurately by anybody creating or sharing information that is of value to the organization." (Jericho Forum, 2011) The information lifecycle management of information sets out the appropriate levels of protection of information required and who is able to access the information. At each step of the information lifecycle management process the information securities requirements are set which enables or alternately disables specific individuals and departments in the organization from accessing the information depending upon the appropriate level of security required for the information that is classified and protected or alternately unprotected. (Jericho Forum, 2011, paraphrased) Information lifecycle management coordinates the access of specific information depending on the security level applied for the information and proactively resolves potential conflicts between operations managers and information technology managers and does so at each stage of lifecycle management of the information through the ISC and ICS processes which avoids any potential unsecure access to that information mitigating against unauthorized access to and use of the information by parties that are not authorized to access and make use of the information. (Jericho Forum, 2011, paraphrased) Bibliography IBM. Information Lifecycle Governance. Retrieved Nov 8, 2010, from http://www.informationmanagementrequest.com/campaigns/compliance_warehouse/site/cim.html?sor=red IBM. Information Lifecycle Governance. Retrieved Nov 8, 2010, from http://www.informationmanagementrequest.com/campaigns/compliance_warehouse/site/cim.html?sor=red Jericho Forum (2009) COA Paper: Information Lifecycle Management. OpenGroup.org. Retrieved December 4, 2011, from http://www.opengroup.org/jericho/COA_Information_Lifecycle_Management_v1.0.pdf Jericho Forum (2009) COA Paper: Information Lifecycle Management. OpenGroup.org. Retrieved December 4, 2011, from http://www.opengroup.org/jericho/COA_Information_Lifecycle_Management_v1.0.pdf Life Cycle Management (N.D.) Information Life Cycle Management. Retrieved December 4, 2011, from http://www.life-cyclemanagement.com/information-life-cycle-management.php Life Cycle Management (N.D.) Information Life Cycle Management. Retrieved December 4, 2011, from http://www.life-cyclemanagement.com/information-life-cycle-management.php McNamara, C (n.d.) Operations Management, Retrieved September 9, 2007, from http://www.managementhelp.org/ops_mgnt/ops_mgnt.htm Overall quality: Your paper is well written and the references, where needed, are properly cited and listed (refer to the TUI guidelines (http://www.tuiu.edu/guidelines/Well-Written-Paper.pdf) if you are uncertain about formats or other issues. Robbins S. (2006) Understand What Motivates Your Boss, Harvard Business School Working Knowledge. Retrieved September 9, 2007, from http://hbswk.hbs.edu/archive/5252.html Treasury Board of Canada (1997). An Enhanced Framework for the Management of Information Technology Projects.…

Pages: 3  |  Case Study  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


People and Talent Management Concepts

All these initiatives have helped the company to attract more talent. C. Impact of People Management and Talent Management on organization People management and talent management have a huge impact in the operations and success of every organization. They help an organization to remain competitive in the global environment, attract talented candidates, select the right candidate for the right job…

Pages: 8  |  Term Paper  |  Style: Harvard  |  Sources: 10


Strategic Planningmanagement Strategic Planning Refers

Vision defines what an organization desires to be, and/or how it wants its world to be. In the long-term, it acts as the source of inspiration to the organization. Similarly, mission defines the fundamental purposes of an organization, concisely describing the reason for an organization's existence, as well as what it does towards achieving its vision. Schraeder (2002) elicits the values of an organization to be the beliefs shared among the stakeholders, which drives the organization's culture, priorities and offers the framework upon which decisions are generated. Finally, strategy defines the art of combined goals for which a company or an organization strives to achieve, and the means through which such goals are met. Through setting ofstrategies, an organization is capable of predicting its favorable directions. The missions, visions and values of an organization are essential during the strategy formulation since they are the basic foundation onto which an organization is constructed upon. An organization's mission defines its purpose or reason for its existence. It is the statement that defines and announces the scope and unique qualities of an organization or company, in relation to other competing partners. The above goals/objectives and strategies are enforceable through the use of a planning tool known as "SWOT analysis." SWOT analysis builds on the development of organizational strengths, resolving its weaknesses, exploiting the possible opportunities and confronting the prevailing threats. Weaknesses and strengths are routinely internal to all organizations while opportunities and threats relate to the external factors (Schraeder, 2002). The possible benefits of a strategic management process to a health organization are that assists in ensuring the organization's success. The process acts as the coordinate machine that directs an organization forward. It defines the current position of the organization, wherever it is likely to be if no changes occurs and provides the possible actions that can be taken in case of a suspicious change or orientation. The process helps in weighing the rewards for action or inaction, the possible risks and appropriate course for long-term performance and/or success. Therefore, a strategic management process should be flexible enough in order to allow optimum response to the ever-changing environments. This process will also ensure that thehealthcare organization continuously updates its framework. Additionally, it provides a check-list for practitioners during the refining and improvement of their organizational systems, as well as for consultants as they strive to improve their products and service offerings. Changes within…

Pages: 4  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4


Communication Management and Organizational Change

" (Flock, 2008, p.6) In other words, the executives "got it" and this involved the embrasure of "the death of the status quo." (Flock, 2008, p.6) Credible communicators formulate stories which, "Unlike the pipeline transmitters, whose memos end up stacked in an in-box on the back side of an executive's desk, along with the rest of last year's slogans for…

Pages: 9  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Examine Failure of Enron

Organizational Behavior and the Enron Collapse The first major corporate collapse resulting from organizational leadership and mismanagement throughout the company was the 2001 Enron implosion. In retrospect, the Enron case demonstrates the manner in which charismatic leadership style, dysfunctional organizational culture, totalitarian rule, and one-dimensional employee evaluations based on performance measures can destroy an organization from within. The study of Enron reveals shortcomings of exclusive reliance on certain styles of leadership and organizational management based on cult-like aspects of social psychology within the vocational realm. Leadership Issues Generally, neither the charismatic leadership style nor the transformational leadership style is considered particularly appropriate for financial services firms because, by nature, those types of organizations rely on highly skilled professionals and do not have high turnover (or change of occupation) rates among their staff (Bass, 1997). Charismatic leadership is considered much more appropriate in connection with lower skilled occupations where high turnover (and change of occupation) rates among employees is much more common, such as in retail sales and promotions. That is mainly because the working environment that corresponds to charismatic leadership tends to be much more emotionally draining and challenging for employees to endure for longer periods of employment. Therefore, organizations that are principally dependent on highly-skilled career-oriented employees much more commonly feature transactional leadership styles (Bass, 1997; Tourish, 2005). Equally important is the issue of the narcissistic personalities of Enron President Jeffrey Skilling and its Chief Executive Officer, Ken Lay (Tourish, 2005). Skilling and Lay cultivated a climate based on their totalitarian authority, one-dimensional focus, unreceptive attitude toward even objective, reasoned, constructive criticism, blind loyalty, punitive management policies, and a cult-like atmosphere that is toxic to modern business organizations and governments (Tourish, 2005; Zimbardo, 2007). Specifically, Enron corporate culture preached excessive adoration of Skilling and Lay; its managers rewarded performance based on a very narrow range of measures; management ruled by fear; and a cult-like indoctrination process which experts in cult behavior refer to as the "initiation" phase of cult membership (Tourish, 2005). In Enron's case, this manifested itself in its initial interviewing process for new prospective hires through its grueling full day-long interviewing procedures that usually included as many as eight successive hour-long interviews with different interviewers. By the end of that ordeal, applicants had already invested so much time and emotional energy in the company that, combined with indoctrination about the company's expertise in hiring only the most…

Pages: 3  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Fictional Case Study Current Situation

The employees and management should coordinate closely to facilitate the change management process throughout various phases. The organization can benefit to a large extant through implementing change management plan. The current organizational performance and employee satisfaction level is evident that it has the potential to perform and bring higher results. The expectations in betterment of organizational results provide motivation for employees and leadership to implement the plan (Von Krogh, Nonaka, & Rechsteiner, 2012). References: Anderson, L.A., & Anderson, D. (2010). The change leader's roadmap: How to navigate your organization's transformation. USA: John Wiley & Sons. Avolio, B.J., & Yammarino, F.J. (Eds.). (2013). Transformational and Charismatic Leadership:: the Road Ahead. USA: Emerald Group Publishing. Bestelmeyer, B., Brown, J., Densambuu, B., Havstad, K., Herrick, J., & Peinetti, H.R. (2013, April). State-and-transition models as guides for adaptive management: What are the needs?.In Meeting Proceedings (pp. 27-33). Cameron, E., & Green, M. (2012). Making Sense of Change Management: A Complete Guide to the Models Tools and Techniques of Organizational Change.USA: Kogan Page. Carter, M.Z., Armenakis, A.A., Feild, H.S., & Mossholder, K.W. (2012).Transformational leadership, relationship quality, and employee performance during continuous incremental organizational change. Journal of Organizational Behavior. Loorbach, D. (2010). Transition management for sustainable development: a prescriptive, complexity-based governance framework. Governance, 23(1), 161-183. Lussier, R.N., & Achua, C.F. (2009). Leadership: Theory, Application, & Skill Development: Theory, Application, & Skill Development. USA: Cengage Learning. Muller, R., & Turner, R. (2010). Leadership competency profiles of successful project managers. International Journal of Project Management, 28(5), 437-448. Rotmans, J., & Loorbach, D. (2009).Complexity and transition management.Journal of Industrial Ecology, 13(2), 184-196. Rowley, S., Hossain, F., & Barry, P. (2010). Leadership through a gender lens: how cultural environments and theoretical perspectives interact with gender. International Journal of Public Administration, 33(2), 81-87. Spillane, J.P. (2012). Distributed leadership (Vol. 4).John Wiley & Sons Inc. Storey, J. (Ed.).(2013). Leadership in organizations.USA: Routledge. Von Krogh, G., Nonaka, I., & Rechsteiner, L. (2012). Leadership in organizational knowledge creation: a review and framework. Journal of Management Studies, 49(1), 240-277. Von Krogh, G., Nonaka, I., & Rechsteiner, L. (2012). Leadership in organizational knowledge creation: a review and framework. Journal of Management Studies, 49(1), 240-277. Wright, B.E., Moynihan, D.P., & Pandey, S.K. (2012). Pulling……

Pages: 5  |  Case Study  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 15


Science and Art of Management

They can invest time in employees and train them. As a result, the whole organization will benefit from a skilled and trained workforce. This frame works on the notion that the structure of an organization is a beautiful but hollow shell if it does not allow the people to use their intelligence and energy to assist the organization. (Bolman and Deal) The human relations frame works on the following assumptions: Organization are made to fulfil the demands of human beings and not vice versa. The relationship between the organizations and people is a need-based relation and both the sides need each other. If the equation of relationship between an individual and an organization is asymmetric, the individual and the organization both will suffer. On the other hand, if the equation is balanced, both sides will benefit from the relationship. (Bolman and Deal) Political Frame This frame works on the notion that the structure of an organization is bound to fail. There are places where structure and rationality will not work. The frame portrays the idea that the structure is eventually taken over by office politics. People gather and talk about what is correct and incorrect in the organization and this leads to a chain reaction which triggers politics. According to this frame, politics is the right way to make decisions for an organization. (Bolman and Deal) The political frame works on the following assumptions: Organizations are associations consisting of different people and groups. There are certain differences between the thinking, perception and beliefs of these people. These beliefs change really slowly. Allocation of scarce resources is the most important decision made by organizations. Hence, the decisions of an organization are related to allocation of resources among people, with power being the most important resource. This leads to conflict. The final decision is reached by bargaining and struggling to get a good position among all the groups. (Bolman and Deal) Symbolic Frame The symbolic frame is the most unconventional of the four frames described by Bolman and Deal. It works on the notion that the organization and its ups and downs cannot be measured and controlled. It is dependent on the culture of the organization rather than calculations and measurement. The symbolic frame makes the management see beyond the normal tangible elements to find out the factors that matter the most. These factors are embedded to the culture of the organization.…

Pages: 7  |  Term Paper  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 3


Working in a Team Most People Have

¶ … Working in a Team Most people have been part of a team effort at some point in their lives, whether it is a sports team, a work team, a study group, or any other kind of convergence of people working for a common goal. Every team has its own unique set of dynamics. However, all teams share one…

Pages: 5  |  Essay  |  Style: Harvard  |  Sources: 5


Epistemology and Meta-Theory of Sound Marketing Theory

EPISTEMOLOGY AND META-THEORY of sound marketing theory All organizations seek to provide their internal and external customers with the best possible mix of quality and service, but many fall short of these goals. While the emergence of e-commerce and its impact of the marketing function have been profound in recent years, many of the fundamental purposes and underlying tenets of…

Pages: 4  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Policy Formulation in a World of Digital Information

Policy Formulation in a world of digital information Some view involvement in information policy, particularly in the government or public sector, as a means of asserting control over information. Describe the subtle, but important differences between "control of information" and its "management" or "organization." The dichotomy that exists in the control of information on the one hand and the pervasive…

Pages: 12  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Kaiser Permanente Is a Titan

" However, that same employee in that same review complained about the bureaucracy that "prevents changes from occurring at a bearable pace. If a large fixture is needed in a department, paperwork and numbers of doors to break down will seem endless" (Anonymous, 2012). Yet another anonymous current employee stated that the organization has "Good benefits. Good morale and work…

Pages: 3  |  Assessment  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Self-Reflection Is One of Those

I still wish that I had paid more attention and taken more care during this module. I do not go to school just to learn the things that interest me, but to learn the things I need to learn. The fourth module was absolutely fascinating. It focused on location. As you can imagine, location is one of the most important aspects of a project. Are resources nearby? Can we cut down cost by moving to a state with lower taxes? These sorts of basic considerations are what draws me into project management. Creating the most efficient and cost effective project is sort of like a puzzle, and if there is anything that fascinates me, it is puzzles. The fifth module irked me a little. Not that it was less knowledge-imparting than other modules, anything would be farther from that truth. No, it was the fact that while every other module was informative and useful to a general audience of project managers, this module was clearly tacked on and focused on a very specific concept. This module focused on e-commerce, selling your product or service online. While that is a neat idea, and one which is increasingly becoming important, I felt that my time would have been better served learning about the other modules. Indeed, as I look back over the class, there are some things I am proud of. I am proud of my hard work on the first two and the fourth modules. I learned a lot, I explored a lot, and I am proud to say that I have learned enough to consider myself competent. I am not so proud of my failure to engage in the third and fifth modules. While I did learn, I did not explore as much, or even ask as many questions as I should have. In the end, though, I am glad I took this class.…

Pages: 2  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Organization Management for Any Business, Whether Government,

Organization Management For any business, whether government, nonprofit, or profit, it is essential for managers to have an understanding about the theories of management. The most prominent theories applicable in this situation are the Scientific Approach, Bureaucratic, and Modern Theory. These theories have a unique emphasis in delivering a proven system for Planning, Organizing, Leading, Coordination, and controlling an organization (Shchermerhorn, 2011). In this light, VDOT was ineffective because it lacked the proper management. An organization is more likely to succeed under a chain of command with a clear mission. Critical organizational changes that managers can take to address VDOT situation is to focus on addressing the organization's division of labor, levels of authority, impersonality, rules, guidelines, and provide a careers based on longevity (Shchermerhorn, 2011). A few examples of large successful bureaucratic organizations are Berkely University of California, and the Manhattan Project. UC Berkeley is world-renowned for it research and contribution to society such as statistical theory, discovery of vitamin E and the cyclotron (University of Berkeley). UC Berkely has shown a history of growth and prosperity thanks to its leadership. While one might consider the organization to operate under bureaucratic leadership, the fact of the case appears to indicate that there is a focus on leadership as politically charged, without any real focus on the functions that need to be performed to reach the goals of the organization. Hence, a bureaucratic focus might be an effective way to provide a new and more effective focus for the organization. 2) According to the SPM Website (2012), the six major challenges that managers face include unrealistic deadlines, scope changes, an inability to manage risk, lack of team skills, poorly defined goals, and poor communication. At VDOT, the most significant challenge is probably to improve overall communication within the company. As it stands, there appears to be a lack of communication not only within the company as a whole, but also on a micro-level among employees within teams. The company has done little to respond to this, being more concerned with managing the politics within it. A secondary problem is unrealistic delaines, with the company completing only 20% of its assigned projects. Hence, this area is in need of significant management changes. The other areas are also in need of management, although a lot of the challenges can be mitigated by constructing a good communication basis among employees, employers, and teams.…

Pages: 3  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Organizational Behavior Book Review of a Management

¶ … Organizational Behavior Book review of a management topic of your choice The book chosen for review in this paper is 'Organizational Behavior: Managing People and Organizations' published in 2011 and written by Ricky W. Griffin, Gregory Moorhead. A number of definitions have been given for the term organizational behavior. The most important definition argues that organizational behavior deals…

Pages: 6  |  Book Review  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 6


Evaluating and Explaining Organizational Accountability in Emergency Management of Typhoon Morakot a Citizens Perspective

¶ … Organizational Accountability in Emergency Management of Typhoon Morakot: A Citizens' Perspective -- Literature Review Chapter Typhoon Morakot The contemporaneous society is unfortunate enough to be witnessing numerous natural calamities. The debate over the causes of these calamities is ongoing, with some arguing the very force of nature and its changing shapes, whilst others blaming the changes on the…

Pages: 30  |  "Literature Review" Chapter  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 30


Organizational Management -- Concepts and Terminology Organizational

Organizational Management -- Concepts and Terminology Organizational Culture and Behavior Organizational culture refers to the collective attitudes and values that characterize business organizations. Organizational behavior refers to the manner in which business organizations implement and manifest the various elements of their organizational culture (Robbins & Judge, 2009). The last organization for which I worked maintained an organizational culture that emphasized equal opportunity, ethical business practices, and the concept of developing leaders from within the organization. That organization also maintained a strong commitment to social welfare and to environmental responsibility. Employees were encouraged to participate in various efforts that benefited the local community and the organization carefully monitored compliance with environmentally conscious policies and practices. Diversity In contemporary American society and business, diversity refers to the differences among individuals comprised by society and business organizations. Generally, diversity includes such differences as gender, race, ethnicity, religion, culture, nationality, sexual orientation, and gender identity (George & Jones, 2008). Diversity is an important aspect of modern business management because statutory law as well as fundamental objective concepts of social responsibility and morality require that all individuals in American society enjoy the same basic rights, opportunities, and benefits. Certain classifications (such as race, ethnicity, religion, and gender) are recognized and protected by federal law; others (such as sexual orientation and gender identity) are only recognized and protected under the laws of some states and are neither recognized nor protected by the laws of other states (George & Jones, 2008). The most observable aspects of diversity with organizations would be the apparent makeup of their personnel in terms of race, ethnicity, nationality, and gender. Communication Communications encompasses the various ways that information is transmitted, shared, received, and stored within business organizations (George & Jones, 2008). Within business organizations, business units, hierarchical chains, and individuals must communicate with one another extensively. Likewise, business organizations must be able to communicate externally with other business organizations, customers, suppliers, contractors, customers, and government agencies. Different forms of business communications typically include electronic messages (i.e. email), written (hard copy) memoranda, telephonic, face-to-face, in addition to other industry-specific or task-specific uses of media such as two-way radios or specialized proprietary software applications (George & Jones,……

Pages: 3  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Organizational Management the Organizing Functions of Management

Organizational Management The organizing functions of management in an organization, related to human resources and knowledge, are especially crucial to an organization's success. Effective organization of human resources provides and mobilizes a framework for success. Such a framework considers the overall structure of the human resources unit, considers the needs of the business and employees, develops personnel organizational charts, incorporates internal and external factors, and establishes management practices for day-to-day operations. In terms of knowledge management, the organizing functions of management are equally crucial. In the case of knowledge management, organizing functions include effectively identifying and mobilizing intellectual and knowledge-based assets, and are focused on specific and clear goals. Further, this process includes provisions to allow employees to become actively involved in knowledge management, the integration of information technology, and is built on an understanding that knowledge is constantly updated, deleted, and amended. The organizing functions of management provide crucial value to the organization. Through organizing functions, the manager can integrate policies and procedures into the organization's operation. The functions of management include planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. All of these basic management functions are necessary in any business environment. In particular, the organizing function is a key component that is often over looked in establishing the framework for a successful business. Organizing is the part of a manager's workload that concerns mobilizing the resources that are necessary to complete a particular task. Effective management in the organizing function includes the often lengthy and complex process of setting goals and formulating specific strategies. During the organizing function, the effective manager decides what resources are necessary, and arranges these resources into a specific and useful structure that are aimed at supporting the organization's overall goals (Griffin, Ebert, and Starke). Effective organization of human resources by management is crucially important to an organization's success. In terms of the overall management of an organization, a group that can require the most consideration during the organization process is human resources. Organizing human resources is an important component of allowing a business to operate as a productive unit. In the organization of human resources, designing the overall organizing structure of the human resources unit is crucial. And ineffectively designed and mobilized structure can create chaos at worst, and company-wide inefficiency and confusion at the best. The organization of a human resources department includes the allocation of the responsibility for hiring and firing, training, and the…

Pages: 5  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Human Resources Managing Organisational Culture

d). Understanding of organisational culture and cultural types also helps the understanding of why managerial reforms may impact differently within and between organisations. An organisation with a predominantly internal process culture, for example, may be more resistant to reforms aimed at promoting innovation. It is expected that staff in high uncertainty avoidance cultures to be more concerned with rule-following and…

Pages: 34  |  Dissertation  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0

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