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Women in the Military How Has Their Role Changed Throughout the Years

Women in the Military Since the beginning of combat history in the United States, women have played an important role in the military. This occurred in both the traditional and non-traditional forms. Women could serve traditionally, for example, as nurses, water bearers and cooks for soldiers in combat. Even in the earliest years, they also served non-traditionally alongside men in…

Pages: 10  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Military Retiree Benefits Did the Government Keep Its Promise

¶ … military retirees are entitled to the sheer enormity and the scope of the endeavor are so gigantic that it borders on the overwhelming. The United States government has a plethora of benefits that encompass the health, welfare and continued treatment of medical issues involving the service men and women throughout the Armed Forces. There are also numerous retirement…

Pages: 46  |  Thesis  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 12


Wars of the Barbary Pirates: To the

Wars of the Barbary Pirates: To the Shores of Tripoli, the Birth of the U.S. Navy and Marines, by Gregory Fremont-Barnes Wars of the Barbary Pirates: To the Shores of Tripoli, the Birth of the U.S. Navy and Marines, Gregory Fremont-Barnes, Osprey Pub Co, November 2006 Main Theses Gregory Fremont-Barnes' "Wars of the Barbary Pirates: To the Shores of Tripoli,…

Pages: 5  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: Chicago  |  Sources: 1


Military IT: Army Knowledge Online

In a sense, the AKO shrinks the bureaucratic obstacles of the military while simultaneously maintaining a network of unparalleled enormity. (Rouse, p. 1) The negative impacts that may be said to emerge from the AKO largely revolve on its relatively cumbersome nature. Due to the extra precautions which must be taken to protect sensitive information and the steps that are taken toward identity verification, many end-users have complained about the system's technological limitations. According to some servicemen and women, limitations in the system include a slower-than-desirable speed of operation and some problems with universal web browser compatibility. While extra steps must surely be taken to produce the adequate level of security restriction for potentially sensitive information and correspondence, the technological shortcomings of the AKO have led some would-be end-users to favor their own email platforms over the mandatory system. (DDS, p. 1) In fact, the DDS reports that only 10% of active servicemen make use of the system today. 3) your recommendations for improving and enhancing your chosen information system. Recommendations for improving this system largely revolve on improving its efficiency without sacrificing its security capabilities. This calls for a refinement of the knowledge sharing technology while reducing the emphasis on email service and other functionalities which are fully available outside of the AKO today. This will involve moving toward a cloud-based strategy of data-basing for the improvement of speed, efficiency and accessibility. Works Cited: Army Knowledge Online (AKO). (2013). Portal. AKOlogin.us.army.mil. Defense Systems Staff (DSS). (2013). Army Knowledge Online Transitions to Next-Generation Enterprise Services. Defense Systems.com. Rouse, M. (2011). Army Knowledge Online……

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Military Structure and Capabilities of

It has twice tested the Taepodong-2, its longest-range inter-continental ballistic missile (ICBM), with a range of up to 10,500 km (about 6,525 miles). It is not known if the Taepodong-2 is operational." (Global Security Organization, nd.p.1) V. North Korea's Security Model The security model of North Korea "explains that a state develops nuclear weapons according to neorealist assumptions on the behavior of states. The weakening military ties with the former Soviet Union and China in the 1990s provided another impetus to develop nuclear capabilities." (CRS Report for Congress, 2004) Before the Soviet Union collapsed and the Chinese economic reform era it is reported that North Korea "enjoyed nuclear umbrellas from their neighboring states. However, the collapse of the Soviet Union, the integration of China and later Russia into the global economy no longer guaranteed these security commitments. In a self-help international system, the defection of two important allies compelled North Korea to increase their own military capabilities to compensate for its former military dependency on the Soviet Union and China. The lack of a credible nuclear deterrent extended by the Soviet Union and China created a lapse in deterrent capabilities leading North Korea to develop its own." (CRS Report for Congress, 2004) Summary and Conclusion This writing has examined the military capabilities of North Korea and its capabilities of producing weapons of mass destruction and has found that North Korea has highly developed military capabilities and is making headway in the production and storage of weapons of mass destructions. Bibliography An Overview of North Korea's Ballistic Missile Program (nd) The National Committee on North Korea. Retrieved from: http://www.ncnk.org/resources/briefing-papers/all-briefing-papers/an-overview-of-north-korea-s-ballistic-missiles Chemical Weapons Program (nd) Weapons of Mass Destruction, Global Security Organization. Retrieved from: http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/world/dprk/cw.htm Military Forces (nd) National. Goals. United States Central Intelligence Agency. Retrieved from: http://www.fas.org/irp/dia/product/knfms95/1510-101_chp4.html Scobell, A. And Sanford, JM (2007) North Korea's Military Threat: Pyongyang's Conventional Forces, Weapons of Mass Destruction, and Ballistic Missiles. Retrieved from: http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pdffiles/pub771.pdf Squassoni, SA (2004) Weapons of Mass Destruction: Trade……

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 6


Tuition Assistance Cutback Response Military

What might be the cost to Joe the taxpayer under the GI Bill? In excess of $90,000 (Sisk, Mar 05, 2013). One must also keep in mind that our second Marine might be the exclusion among current beneficiaries of the GI Bill. Information from the Veterans Administration and the Labor Department point toward one-in-five leaving service members turn out to be full-time students. However under 8% continue in school long enough to conclude their degree. In actual fact, the one-year failure charge among veterans studying as full-time students is well above 70% (Patton, et al. April 5, 2013). Therefore, a lot of the $18 billion presently budgeted for the GI Bill is going to waste. Although there is an enormous lack of enthusiasm to slash that program, seeing that the GI Bill's storied standing in American History. However, that looks over a few inopportune facts; mainly, the amount of veterans who made use of their benefits under preceding versions of the GI Bill was comparatively small; vets who went to college were driven about their studies and mostly committed to completing their academic course (Gore, March 12, 2013). However, present day servicemen have been informed that college is the single option for those who want to achieve something and many have been wronged by commercial schools that see students as an instrument for enhancing share-holder worth, or public universities that are not ready and badly equipped for the veterans who are coming into their classroom. That is one reason that tuition assistance ought to be increased, not cut. Think again of the above mentioned case study example of the U.S. Marine, the branch that has in the past stressed the importance of off-duty education for workers of all ranks. Presently, in excess of 45% of his higher non-commissioned officers have as a minimum an associate's degree; approximately 30% possess a bachelor's degree and eight percent have their master's (Gura, March 11, 2013). Practically all of those degrees were finished through chosen education, making use of tuition assistance. The advantage to the Marines -- and the rest of the military -- is almost immeasurable. Conclusion While spending cuts in present fiscal times are necessary, the Tuition Assistance program gave thousands of young men and women who more often than not might not have been able to financially pay for college to finish their higher education. At a period in time when…

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Military Organization Managing the Fire Without and

Military Organization MANAGING the FIRE WITHOUT and WITHIN Military Organization Problems The physical and mental welfare of men and women in the military is a fundamental concern in its management. That welfare necessarily requires sufficient funding for these soldiers, and provision for adequate diagnostic equipment and treatment of known and unknown physical and mental health problems. These health problems include…

Pages: 5  |  Thesis  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 3


U.S. Military Bias Challenges Present in Overcoming

U.S. Military Bias Challenges Present in Overcoming Biases in the United States Military: Past, Present, and Future "The few. The Proud." "Be all that you can be." "See the world." These hiring slogans for various branches of the United States military (Marines, Army, and Navy, respectively; the Air Force has never officially adopted a slogan) suggest a great amount of pride, and offer opportunities of service and of personal fulfillment and achievement. These are some of the traditional sources for honor through military service, and it makes perfect sense to invoke them in trying to encourage enlistment -- the military is putting its best foot forward, and offering a kind of training and experience that no one else can. But though these slogans are wholly democratic in their language, and though they stem are issued by the oldest democracy in existence, the actual institutions behind these slogans might not be so equitable. The various branches of the United States military have long been marked by severe biases, where opportunities provided to some -- i.e. white heterosexual males -- have been entirely denied to others quite explicitly for reasons of gender, race, and more recently, sexuality. From the segregation of troops through every major war until the Korean War to the very apparent dearth of female officers that persists to this day to the failed and discriminatory "don't ask, don't tell" policy, the military has not shown a true and concerted attempt to match their actions to the equality promised -- or at least suggested by -- their statements. Instead, the dominant power structure -- again, white heterosexual males -- has perpetuated itself by the consistent oppression of anyone different from themselves. This pattern was seen first in the segregation of African-Americans, then the barriers and degradations that women have been subjected to, and finally in the ongoing treatment of homosexuals. Perhaps the most well-known case of widespread bias in the United States military is the segregation of African-American and white troops throughout most of the country's history. Most of this occurred over periods of time when the concept of a woman serving in the military would have been simply unthinkable, and issues of sexuality -- especially homosexuality -- were simply not discussed in a sort of "don't ask, tell, or do" policy that extended to and from society at large. This does not excuse such thought or action, but the…

Pages: 4  |  Essay  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 2


Navy an Historical Account of

Of course, the U.S. had attempted to an isolationist veneer -- but the Navy, now an entity that could determine its own course -- had other plans: the naval strategy between the Wars was one of growth, and growth was to be achieved by bringing together three key points: "The first of these was War Plan Orange, which provided the…

Pages: 8  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 8


Sociology Applying the Sociological Perspective:

Many mothers in the United States were saying goodbye forever to their sons and daughters, as were the mothers in Iraq. Each one faced the uncertainty of whether their child would return and if they did return, in what condition? However, the interviewee also witnessed families that did not have resiliency and faced too many hardships without proper tools (mental, physical, and social skills and abilities) that hindered their abilities to make good decisions or any decision at all. They simply gave up, as their lives seemed too hard and too overwhelming to endure. The interviewee realized that his family is unique in that regard. He also realized that his family is why he has been able to address the trauma he faced in Iraq and with his injuries. He has resilience, appropriate development, strong self-esteem, and a social support system encouraging his complete recovery. He believes his military background added to this ability to recover so quickly and so completely, despite the physical scars he wears. References: Engel, G. The Biopsychosocial Approach. 2012. Web. 20 March 2012. Erikson, E. Erikson's Developmental Stages. Springhouse Corporation. 1990. Web. 20 March 2012. Hoge, C.W., Castro, C.A. & Eaton, K.M. Impact of Combat Duty in Iraq and Afghanistan on Family Functioning: Findings from the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research Land Combat Study. In Human Dimensions in Military Operations Military Leaders Strategies for Addressing Stress and Psychological Support, Meeting Proceedings RTO-MP-HFM-134, Paper 5. 2006. Print. Leske, J.S. & Jiricka, M.K. Impact of family demands and family strengths and capabilities on family well-being and adaptation after critical injury. American Journal of Critical Care, 1998: 383-392. Print. Meredith, L.S., Sherbourne, C.D., Gaillot, S.J., Hansell, L., Ritschard, H.V., Parker, A.M., and Wrenn, G. Promoting Psychological Resilience in the U.S. Military. Rand Corporation. 2011. Print. Smith Conway, K. And Li, M. Family Structure and Child Outcomes: A High Definition, Wide Angle Snapshotu. Review of Economics of the Household. March 2011.……

Pages: 4  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Australian Defense Force and Whole of Government Operations

Australian Defense Force and Whole of Government Operations Has the Australian Defense Force (ADF) "broken the code" to successful integration of joint-interagency support during the conduct of military operations? Following the end of Australian involvement in the Vietnam War a decision was made by the Government of Australia to reorganize the department supporting the military services, which included the Army,…

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Leadership Practice Concepts

Army Comradeship: Important to Military Institution Army Final Paper DESCRIPTION OF THE ORGANIZATION Perhaps there is no organization in the world that is as disciplined, motivated and sophisticated as the United States military. Divided into different service groups, namely, the army, the air force and the navy, this organization consists of the best trained men and women. Not only are…

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 6


Evolution of U.S. Military Combat Operations and Chemistry Warfare Defense

¶ … Evolution of Nuclear Weapons The evolution of chemical and biological weapons The evolution of U.S. military combat operations began sometime in the 1775 (Doughty et al.,1995). An examination of the American military combat operations can be traced from the campaigns as well as changing practices that have defined the Western warfare. It begins with the Anglo-American wars during…

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U.S. Military Organizational Culture the Competitive Edge

U.S. military organizational culture The competitive edge that the U.S. military continuously enjoy is greatly linked to its strong corporate culture in the entire nation. U.S. military was built on three fundamental beliefs of significant capabilities in both defense and power projection. Consequently, these principles of operation have enabled U.S. military to instill a unique culture amongst its branches like the Continental Navy, Continental Army, and the continental Marines. As a basis for their integrity, the military organization advocates for strong military values that include strength, alertness, and defensive capabilities at all times. In light of customer service, the company exists to serve its country, support the friends of the nation and its structures, and give back to the local community through security services. Finally, in regards to defense, U.S. military has created a culture of innovativeness, diversity in services, and teamwork (Culture). This analyzes five theoretical constructs and the influences that shape U.S. military organizational culture and their impact in public administration management in the United States. US military built its organizational culture based on the personality of its founder, Second Continental Congress. Second Continental Congress started this organization as just a small organization that was fostered at protecting the country from the external influences and threats like the world wars. Currently, U.S. military has is multinational departments running other retails stores countries such as Canada, Brazil, China, among others. Second Continental Congress is credited as being among the pioneer employers that referred to the security matters in the country as lethal. The strength of the Second Continental Congress, positive attitude, and nurturing heart gave the organization the qualities of charismatic performance that was directed at influencing safekeeping of the strategies of security in the country. Evidently, military personnel have been made to believe that they do not work for someone, but instead assist in getting the work executed in the country. As such, the perception that has been created amongst the employees is that those who work and perform extraordinary equally get a great share of the organization's profitability and the success of the country security details. Organizational ethics is the second factor that influences and shapes the culture of any organization as the U.S. military organization. Ethics refers to the rule of acceptable code of conduct and behavior (Driskill & Brenton, 2005). U.S. military stores have been keen on observing ethical standards of fairness, honesty, and service…

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F-35 Joint Strike Fighter the

" (Gertler, 2010) The result is that the committee states a recommendation for a reduction of $204.9 million in the APAF account within OCD. (Gertler, 2010) The following illustration shows the Summary of Action on FY2010 F-35 quantities and funding. Figure 3 Summary of Action on FY2010 F-35 Quantities and Funding Source: Gertler (2010) Tiron (2010) specifically reports that the F-35 "…has undergone significant reshaping as a result of ballooning costs and development delays. The F-35 is meant to replace older aircraft for the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps as well as international militaries. The cost of the program has risen to $382.4 billion, a 65% increase from the projected costs in 2002." Summary and Conclusion The costs for development and production of the F-35 JSF aircraft have been problematic and recently the program has experienced a decrease in funding due to the difficulties in managing development and production of these aircraft. The projected finish date for the developmental phase of the project was previously set for 2011 however, a new date is presently stated as it is estimated that the program will enter full production n 2016. The F-35 JSF will be sufficient for all branches of the service and will effectively replace aircraft presently be used by the armed forces. References Gertler, J. (2010) F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) Program: Background and Issues for Congress. Retrieve from: http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/weapons/RL30563.pdf Tiron, R. (2010) Senate Appropriators Reduce Funding for Lockheed's F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. 14 Sept, 2010. The Hill. Retrieved from: http://thehill.com/news-by-subject/defense-homeland-security/118661-senate-appropriators-slash-funding-for-f-35-joint-strike-fighter- Axe, David (2009) Report: Two-Year Delay for Joint Strike Fighter. Danger Room. Wired News. 24 July 2009. Retrieved from: http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2009/07/report-two-year-delay-for-joint-strike-fighter/ F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) International, Air-Force Technology. Line retrieved from: http://www.airforce-technology.com/projects/jsf/ Keyes, C. (2010) Closed-door Defense Meeting Reviews Costly F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. 22 Nov 2010. CNN News. Retrieved from: http://www.cnn.com/2010/U.S./11/22/joint.strike.fighter/……

Pages: 6  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Brats: Military Deployments in the War on

¶ … Brats: Military Deployments in the War on Terror The legendary advantages of being a "military brat" have been heralded for decades, especially in being able to see much of the world with the military parent. Previously the term just applied to the children of full time military personnel. However, with the increased use of National Guard and Reserve…

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First Gulf War

¶ … Gulf War Although many people believe that the current problems in the Middle East can be traced to the end of World War II and the creation of Israel, much of the current conflict can be attributed to the Cold War. In fact, the United States maintained a strong military presence in the Middle East. "The continuous, albeit…

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World History Civilization

History of Military & Weapons Systems The military and weapons systems are critical components employed by the state in ensuring two aspects; one would be their internal security and the other being to deter other states from engaging them into any form of armed conflict. An advanced and sophisticated military and weapons system translates into a more secure state and more importantly creates a condition wherein any form of hostile actions from other states are deterred. Throughout time, states have been consistently improving their military capabilities; they have made active strides in making weapons that can inflict substantial collateral damage and casualties with the effective use of technology. Moreover, weapons that can instill fear into the enemy were developed. Weapons and military systems were predicated on the use of force, as such the more force utilized corresponds to greater chances that the state's interest is upheld. This is the tipping point in any form of conflict resolution; states with advanced military and weapons system are seen as dominant players that set the rules of the game in the international arena. The Romans can be cited as a good example of how dominant states can become with the possession of an advanced military and weapons system. The Roman Army was divided into units known as legions, which combined from 4,500 to 6,000 men. Each legion was divided into smaller groups of 60 to 120 legionnaires, as the soldiers were called. Because these smaller groups could separate and attack an enemy from the sides and rear as well as the front, the Roman Army had much maneuverability. The weapons developed during this time was the double edged swords used by the infantry, the iron headed ram utilized for breaking down gates and walls, offensive weapons such as catapults which functions at throwing iron darts and ballistae used to hurl heavy stones at the enemy. (Stearns et.al. 1991, 217) With the strength of the Roman Army they were able to expand Rome's sphere of influence throughout Europe and in Africa. Roman soldiers were professionally trained in the art of warfare and their military leaders have been honed by their battlefield experience and were defined by their tactical prowess. The Roman Army gave the Roman Empire a distinct advantage over their enemies because of the characteristics I have mentioned. With the collapse of the Roman Empire, the world witnessed a shift from the focus…

Pages: 3  |  Thesis  |  Style: Chicago  |  Sources: 2


Civil Military Relations

Civil-Military Relations Civil military relations are an important subject of discussion in almost every state. However it is even more crucial in countries undergoing transition to democracy and countries plagued by years of military rule. Armies have a strong hold on politics of all societies, they represent the ultimate defense of a state and stand as the symbol of their…

Pages: 8  |  Thesis  |  Style: Chicago  |  Sources: 5


Women in Combat Units Women in the

Women in Combat Units Women in the army are nothing new. During the Second World War, women served in the front as much as men, both among the allied and the axis powers. The separation of duties resulted in companies called the WAC -- Women Army Corps that had details in medical, and other non-combatant operations. They were also subject…

Pages: 12  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 8


Effects of War on Soldiers

PTSD Comparative Study of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder between military and private contractors stationed in Iraq Americans at War Conflict is a part of the human condition. Although most would prefer peace, sometimes war represents an inevitable reality. Since the founding of our nations, Americans have been called to serve our nation in the armed forces numerous times. The latest…

Pages: 10  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 11


Douglas Macarthur and the Inchon Decision

Douglas MacArthur and the Inchon Decision Most historians today would agree that Douglas MacArthur (1880-1964) has not "faded away," but remains a source of ongoing research and scholarly investigation concerning his career and the decisions that ultimately contributed to his downfall. A brilliant tactician, military leader and communicator by most accounts, General MacArthur also possessed an oversized ego and some…

Pages: 15  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 8


America and the Great War

World War I American Participation in World War I When America declared war against Germany and Austria in 1917, the Armed Forces of the United States were rather unimpressive in the eyes of the Europeans. Europe had been at war for several years and the participants considered themselves to have the most experienced and most capable forces in the world. And the Americans' performance in recent military expeditions left much to be desired. While the Europeans fought hard, gritty battles, the American military was failing to capture a simple Mexican bandit named Pancho Villa. In spite of this, the Americans were an industrialized nation with huge population, and within a year of declaring war against Germany and her allies, the Americans would not only raise an army the strength of which equaled any in the world, but one that would play an invaluable role in the Allied victory. It was on April 6th 1917 that Congress acceded to President Woodrow Wilson's request and declared war against Germany, officially entering the conflict. But the United States was far from ready to immediately intervene on the side of the Allies. The performance of the American Army in 1916 expedition into Mexico after Pancho Villa led the Germans to believe that "the United States would be in no position to add significant military strength to the Allies." (Ziegler 38) and they had some right to think this as the United States Army consisted of "just 128,000 and 81,000 Reservists, and lacking almost all the equipment necessary for modern warfare…." (Henry 3) However, the Germans' were wrong and within two and a half months of the American declaration of war, "more than 500,000 men had volunteered in the American Army and Navy." (the World War 158) and these troops were desperately needed by the Allies. By the beginning of 1918, the Russian withdrawal from the war was imminent, the British had suffered catastrophic losses during their 1917 campaigns, the Italians had been soundly defeated at Caporetto, "and the demoralized state of the French army made an enormous infusion of American troops imperative." (Ziegler 61) but when the new Communist government in Russia made peace with Germany, freeing up hundreds of thousands of German troops, they decided to make one last all out offensive against the Allies in the West. It was in March of 1918 that the Germans sent 65 divisions against the Western…

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Air Power Command and Control Lessons Learned at Operational Level of War

Vietnam: A Bird's Eye View of the historical and strategic past of U.S. Operations Strategic Setting The territory of the former French colony of Vietnam was occupied by two opposing armies, that of the North Vietnamese, armed by the Soviets, and the South Vietnamese, backed first by the French, then later by the Americans. Vietnam at the time of the conflict was divided into two opposing nations, as Korea is, still, to this day. (Phan, 2002) Opposing Forces Ho Chi Minn, a communist nationalist led the North Vietnamese. The United States Air force was devoted to training the VNAF (South Vietnamese Air Forces) to fight for this evolving independent nation, an objective that was not achieved. Command Relationships / Adjustments made to Doctrine From the beginning, the White House was criticized as exercising undue influence over the waging of the war. For instance, during the first major air offensive known as "Operation Rolling Thunder," the White House, it was alleged selected targets designed for public relations rather than real strategic value. It did not focus on advice from military leaders from the actual theater of operations. "President Johnson and Secretary McNamara maintained detailed tactical control of the missions. President Johnson and his advisors chose the targets from an Armed Forces' suggested list." (Humphrey, 1980, p.36) All the while during this first operation, the South Vietnamese remained unable to effectively mobilize civilians to support their cause, nor function independently, while the North Vietnamese nationalist emphasis on their own struggle, the North's perceived resistance to foreign forces during "Rolling Thunder," and its greater perceived independence from the Soviet Union by the Vietnamese themselves all rallied support to the cause. (Thies, 1980) Of course, this independence goes against the White House 'domino' theory that preached that if Vietnam were to fall under Soviet control, so would the rest of South East Asia, much along the lines of Eastern Europe. However, this view did not take into consideration recent Vietnamese resistance to colonial French oppression, the actual level of Soviet influence over the Vietcong, and fundamentally highlights the faulty analogy of Europe and East Asia. (Phan, 2002) Employment Concepts Another less well publicized aspect of the analogies of World War II and the Vietnamese Conflict is the use of the carpet bombing that proved so successful in trampling the remnants of Nazi Germany, and so ineffective in taking Vietnam. True, the tactical focus of…

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Army Structure; From 3-Brigade Division

With the Division-86 system change, the Army also published a Training and Doctrine Command guide in order to execute successful implementation. On October 1, 1982, the Command published tables of organization and equipment in order to implement this second attempt at achieving the heavy division concept. The tables, which outlined both armored division and mechanized infantry, set out five variations…

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Guerrilla Warfare Is a Successful Tactic

Guerilla Warfare The Efficacy of Guerilla Warfare Terrorists, in some ways, are just as organized and effective as a police force or the military. The police force and more so with the military, there is a great abundance of resources and supplies dedicated for training purposes. Terrorists and militarized groups from third world countries often have to be more inventive because of their lack of financing and lack of supplies. Guerilla warfare is a way that terrorists and groups from third world countries get attention and accomplish some of their goals. Guerilla warfare involves not military personnel, often called civilians, to participate and serve vital functions in guerilla activities. Participants in guerilla warfare have advantages that members of large armies do not. While there are advantages and disadvantages to the use of guerilla warfare, guerilla warfare, overall, is a successful tool of small countries and terrorist organizations. In Guerilla Warfare, famous revolutionary leader and physician, Che Guevara defines guerilla warfare early on in the text as: …the basis of the struggle of a people to redeem itself, has diverse characteristics, different facets…geographical and social conditions in each country determine the mode and particular forms that guerrilla warfare will take, there are general laws that hold... (1961, 2) Guerilla warfare is a type of strategy that takes place within a context where many people are suffering and struggling for basic human rights, despite the political views or agenda of those in power and those without power. Guerilla warfare is a term that was coined in the 20th century, yet there is evidence that guerilla warfare and tactics have existed since the times of ancient human civilizations. Guerilla warfare, according to this definition, is not uniform in practice, but is uniform in philosophy. This means that depending on the physical and social conditions in which guerilla warfare is used will predominantly determine the precise plans and maneuvers of the guerillas. Guerillas have to use what is available in their physical environment, what they may already have access to or possess, what they could gain access to or possess by theft, and what the precise nature of the targets of the warfare are. These are the factors that determine what exactly will play out for guerillas, whether they are from terrorist organizations or from small and/or third world countries. Guevara continues by arguing that while the form of the guerilla warfare takes varies,…

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FDR and LDB, War Leaders

FDR and LDB, War Leaders Franklin D. Roosevelt was considered by many to be an amazing leader. He was elected President of the United States for four terms, a feat unheard of even today. He also demonstrated many leadership qualities that made him stand out from past and current political leaders. Numerous scholars and research agree FDR was not just…

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Sexual Assault Policies Involving Military Members

Sexual Assault Policies Sexually Assault Policies involving military members Sexual Assault Policies Involving Military Members A Study of the Anatomy of Rape in Military and Legal Recourses Available To Victims Rape within U.S. Military -- A Perspective Any study of rape in U.S. Military should perhaps be put in proper perspective by analyzing the underlying reasons that prompt a soldier…

Pages: 8  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 12


DIMHRS vs. HRIS

¶ … Department of Defense (DOD) has been using the HRIS Human Resources Information System which is a "..."software or online solution for the data entry, data tracking and information needs of the Human Resources, payroll, management and accounting functions within a business." (Heathfield, 2009) The Department of Defense (DOD) is "transforming the services to face current and future challenges." This is because recent studies have indicated a need for DOD to integrate its forces to better serve the requirements of the nation. However, there is a challenge as noted in the work of Koch (2009) who states that DIMHRS with all its potential has not been implemented in a timely manner and this has created other complications and specifically in the work of Koch (2009) noted are Navy applications that are presently on hold until DIMHRS has been fully implemented. Funding cuts are stated to have resulted in impairing "readiness and retention" as well as impact the ability to "support migration to the DIMHRS" and specifically from the view of the Navy to "develop Navy-unique functionality that will not exist in the DIMHRS." (Koch, 2009) DIMHRS VS HRIS Introduction The Department of Defense (DOD) has been using the HRIS Human Resources Information System which is a "..."software or online solution for the data entry, data tracking and information needs of the Human Resources, payroll, management and accounting functions within a business." (Heathfield, 2009) Typical provisions of HRIS include: (1) Management of all employee information; (2) Reporting and analysis of employee information; (3) Company-related documents such as employee handbooks, emergency evacuation procedures, and safety guidelines; (4) Benefits administration including enrollment, status changes, and personal information updating; (5) Complete integration with payroll and other company financial software and accounting systems; and (6) Applicant and resume management. (Heathfield, 2009) This system however, has been revamped as this work will demonstrate. I. Consolidation of the Department of Defense Human Resources System The work of Ladra (2005) entitled: "Personnel Transformation -- Consolidation of the Department of Defense Human Resources System Into a Joint system" states that the Department of Defense (DOD) is "...transforming the services to face current and future challenges." This is because recent studies have indicated a need for DOD to integrate its forces to better serve the requirements of the nation." (Ladra, 2005) II. Services to be Combined The current DOD system was stated in the work of Ladra (2005) to…

Pages: 4  |  Thesis  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 5


Air Force United States Air Force During

Air Force United States Air Force During World War II, the U.S. Army Air Corps established the significance and value of air warfare. Air power contributed greatly in the Navy as well. So, when President Harry S. Truman signed the National Security Act of 1947, a separate U.S. Department of the Air Force was created and the U.S. Air Force came into existence. Its initial focus was on creating flying weapons using the new jet rocket technology. In the intervening years, the U.S. Air Force has become the supreme air force in the world. (Saunders, 2008) The vision of the U.S. Air Force is "Global vigilance, reach and power. " the Air Force mission is to "fly, fight and win." (Air Force Link, 2008) The Air Force played a vital role as part of the United States nuclear arsenal throughout the Cold War. Its Strategic Air Command (SAC) controlled both ground-launched Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles (ICBMs) and nuclear bombs carried on long-range bombers like the B-52 Stratofortress. (Grabianowski) The end of the Cold War did not mean completion of the Air Force's mission. The Air Force's speed, range, precision, leathality, and flexibility gave America what Secretary of the Air Force Donald B. Rice called "global reach, global power." (U.S. Air Force - USAF History) The Air Force recognized the need for streamlining in the post Cold War period. In the 1990's, it consolidated from thirteen to eight major commands. It closed bases, and downsized from 600,000 personnel in 1988 to less than 388,000 in the late 1990s. Despite the smaller force, the Air Force has been called to action and successfully completed those missions in places like Bosnia, the Gulf War, and Iraq, and has supported humanitarian operations in Somalia, Rwanda, and around the world. (U.S. Air Force - USAF History) The Culture of the Air Force The U.S. Air Force Culture and Language Center defines culture as, "the creation, maintenance and transformation across generations of semi-shared patterns of meaning, sense making, affiliation, action and organization by groups. It would seem easy to simply put the Air Force into……

Pages: 2  |  Thesis  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Role of Women in World War II

Role of Women in World War II The Women's Auxiliary Corps The role of women changed in the 20th century without precedence in history. The change began with events during World War II, which altered and even reversed women's social servility and traditional role. Women's rights reached a peak during this time, especially with the formation of the first female…

Pages: 9  |  Thesis  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 8


Douglass Macarthur and the Inchon Decision

Inchon Described as being "the most brilliant and among the most flamboyant American generals of the twentieth century," General Douglas MacArthur would launch an amphibious offensive in Korea that proved a major turning point in the war ("The Politics of Getting an Idea Adopted: The Inchon Decision," p. 295). In spite of being forced to step down from his post…

Pages: 15  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Intelligence Agencies

Intelligence Agencies What exactly is an Intelligence Agency? It is an agency that is responsible for gathering information about an enemy of any kind, and assimilating this information in such a way that it would be useful to them in their fight against the enemy. One of the more famous Intelligence Agencies of the world is the Central Intelligence Agency…

Pages: 28  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Vietnam War - Web Sources

It provides links to "Timeline," "The Jungle Years," and "The Bitter End" - each in turn provides detailed timelines of the events of the war. There are also links to The History of Vietnam War, Vietnam at a Glance, Hotspots, Who's Who in the History of Vietnam, Combat Chronicles, Military Photographs of the Vietnam War, Executive Order 11231 -- Establishing the Vietnam Service Medal, and numerous other links to information concerning the war. It is a very detailed account of the war and provides a wealth of information. Another site, "Vets With a Mission" at http://www.vwam.com/vets/hisintro.html. provides a short history on its home page with side links to the Early History of Vietnam, Research, Tet Offensive, Allies in Vietnam, Marines, Army Airforce, Navy, and Memorabilia. Each of these links provides a short essay concerning the topic. Although it is an informative site, it is not very impressive and does not relate any information concerning the "unpopularity" of the war or the toll it took on Americans, both in the military and at home. The first two sites gave a much broader portrait of the war and also included outside sources as well as a generous number of photos. The last site was rather one-sided and provided zero links to outside sources. Works Cited Vets With a Mission. http://www.vwam.com/vets/hisintro.html Vietnam War: 1965-1973. http://www.vietnamwar.com/ The American Experience: Vietnam Online. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/vietnam…

Pages: 2  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Inequalities Rampant Among the Dod

Recently, according to one article surveyed, the principal director for equal opportunity at the DOD was present at an African-American History Month celebration at Tougaloo College, a black college, in order to "inform African-American students and minorities of military civil service opportunities" (Sample, 2003). The article points out that at present the current representation of African-Americans as officers within all branches in the military is only 8%, while representation in general is at 20% (Sample, 2003). This has proven a somewhat effective method thus far, as any candidate wants to know that the people recruiting them are going out of there way to meet them on their turf and in their environment. Bowling (1995) notes in his observation that the Navy and other military branches are stepping up to the plate, implementing affirmative action programs and even establishing quotas for recruiting minority candidates even though none are necessarily required by government agencies. The impetus behind this is a desire to not only meet but also exceed the expectations that have been established by EEO programs and policy initiatives. The goal isn't simply to correct past wrongs, but to make sure that they do not happen again, and that all members of society are adequately represented whether they work as officers or in the civilian workforce. Historically efforts at recruiting and retaining minority candidates have been minimal at best as pointed out by the article (Bowling, 1995). However, this is rapidly changing as evidenced by new Human Resources requirements and programs that are sending military officers out to recruit young candidates. The lure of a stable work environment and a future where rapid promotion and advancement may occur may be too much for candidates to resist, particularly in an economy where the future is as Navy and other department officials point out, uncertain (Bowling, 1995). Further the article points out that while the relative numbers of women's and minorities in key jobs has steadily increased at management levels, they are still underrepresented in the highest grades of military organizations (Bowling, 1995). Agencies are now required to conduct affirmative recruitment for occupations and grades where historically minorities have been underrepresented (Bowling, 1995). It is important that these agencies not only work to recruit candidates at basic levels, but work to promote them specifically to high up levels within their organizations. Only then will past inequities be resolved and will government and other…

Pages: 5  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Joint Interoperability Review of the Literature Seeking

Joint Interoperability Review of the Literature Seeking to Define and Understand Joint Interoperability Fundamental Challenges Lack of Fully Integrated Interoperable Communication Systems Problem for Military Joint Interoperability Spans Decades Network Centric Warfare Plays a Prominent/Dominant Role in Emerging Joint Operations JOINT INTEROPERABILITY The objective of this study is to examine the definitions and applications of 'joint interoperability' in terms of…

Pages: 12  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


U.S. Intelligence Strategy History the

One of the most important aspects of this was that intelligence collaboration was finding its start during this time. At this time, during 1942, Army staff were cut back by the hief of Staff General Georg C. Marshall, and the operations in the War Department Operations Division were also centralaized. Duties that were historically handled by administartive personnel were now…

Pages: 5  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


Representations of War in the

Under normal circumstances, the life of one soldier would not be as important as to risk the lives of seven men, however, Ryan is the last remaining male descendent in his family as it is revealed during the course of the film that all of his brothers, who enlisted in the Armed Forces, were killed.[footnoteRef:15] The film's narrative is inspired…

Pages: 8  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 7


Child Soldiers the Question of

This way children are the first target to any enemy and are used as frontline targets becoming the first to give and receive the attack. In most of the cases as it is expected kids die in crossfire, if in the event they survive the minefields and are able to dodge away from the bullet then they become murderers. Everything…

Pages: 10  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 8


Intelligence Community the History of

Intelligence Community The history of deception and intelligence is deeply seated within the American way of life and the roots of democracy. The creation of the republic which began with a declaration of independence from a tyrant monarch gave birth to the institution that is protected by intelligence gathering techniques and operations. Since that time, enemies of the state have…

Pages: 11  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 11

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