Home  >  Subjects  >  current page My Profile

Essays on "Music / Musicians / Instruments"  |  Term Papers 1-40

 1 2 3 . . . Last › Filter Options:  

Identify the Context of Electronic Computer Generated and Electro Acoustic Music Performance

Electronic Music: instruments, techniques & PERFORMERS For the most part, electronic music began in the 1950's in Europe, where the various governments provided funds for special recording studios to meet the new demand for different types of music. During this time, the use of tape recorders "became popular and some engineers and composers gathered together various sounds, such as that…

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Innovations and Developments in the Music Festival Industry

¶ … business today, the music industry has seen rapid and extreme changes. Not least of these is the change towards the digital media and the Internet. These have changed the face and nature of the music industry, as well as the development and purchase of music by the public. In addition, the current drive towards more green technologies has…

Pages: 12  |  Essay  |  Style: Harvard  |  Sources: 12


Music Appreciation Describe the Characteristics of the

Music Appreciation Describe the characteristics of the twentieth-century concept of melody. Refer to at least one listening example in your response. (Textbook p.301-302, 309-310) Melody only seems to have taken a back seat in contemporary music when compared to old times. Melodies of innovative new composers are often hard to read as they turn to scales which are not the…

Pages: 15  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Jazz "Blues After Dark," Dizzy

The piano does not really play a major role here but it is still a team effort. Performance: "Loverman," Dizzy Gillespie (trumpet), Sonny Stitt (tenor saxophone), Belgium 1958 The style is not bebop, but ballad The role of the piano is delicate The role of the bass is regular bass line The role of the drums is brushing The role of the saxophone is to play lead and melody Piano adds accent and punctuation, when necessary. Suddenly the saxophone speaks more, packing sixteenth notes into each bar. The overall feeling is soft and mellow, even as the melody becomes more urgent and complex. At about two minutes, the backing band ceases to play. It is Stitt, on his own. He is speaking directly to the listener. His approach allows him to be his own rhythm as well as his own melody section. It is apparent now that this was his solo. The phrasing at the end, the way he plays the last notes, is iconic. Although the song itself is very slow and languid, it leaves the listener with a deep emotional impact. The title, "Loverboy," does suggest that there is a love song written here. Performance: "Blues Walk." Dizzy Gillespie Quintet Live in Belgium 1958 with Dizzy Gillespie (trumpet) Sonny Stitt (tenor saxophone), Lou Levy (piano), Ray Brown (bass), Gus Johnson (drums) Style = BeBop Role of Piano = Stride and Comping Role of the Bass = Walking Role of the Drums = Brushing and Riding but also mallets and sticks Role of the Trumpet and Saxophone = Lead and Melody Then, the tempo slows somewhat so that the meat of the song begins. Central phrases are repeated, and the trumpet and saxophone play together. The drumming is lively and integral to the song, adding a fast tempo and coaxing all the other instruments to follow suit. Drumming is not just brushes, but also using sticks. This is also a complex song. The first solo is the saxophone. Stitt plays a continuous flow of notes, barely stopping to breathe. The piano accompanies with some punctuation. A walking bass line also plays sixteenth notes. In fact, the title of the song could easily refer to the walking bass line. Toward the end of the saxophone solo, the phrasing changes briefly and it has an overall improvised feel. Conclusion The Dizzy Gillespie Quintet concert performed with Sonny Stitt on tenor saxophone,…

Pages: 4  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Relationship of Music and Culture

Author Asai notes, "The taiko is a cylindrical drum with two drumheads. Each drumhead has a wide rim with up to twelve holes, through which ropes (himo) are strung. D? is the term for the drum body and wa or mimi refers to the rim" (Asai, 1999, p. 120). The drums are played with drumsticks called bachi, which are often…

Pages: 10  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 3


Music Misconception Is a False

The rap music is a genre filled with diversity of sonic expression; but the fact remains that many rappers "talk about women like they're animals," just as Big Ru does in Ferrell's story (448). As Crouch puts it, "This misogynistic and brutal turn in music is damaging the image of black American women to the point that they are approached outside of the U.S. As freelance prostitutes," (3). The misconceptions have gone so far that they are impacting the lives of individuals in real ways, which is why the media needs to take greater responsibility for its actions. In "The Negative Influence of Gangster Rap and What Can be Done about It," author Anthony Giovacchini agrees that the media has a direct social responsibility to create positive role models with their music superstars. Musicians, artists, actors, and anyone who becomes famous has the personal responsibility to be a role model because young people are looking up to them as idols. Role models who glorify killing and "bitches" are not doing a service to themselves or to society; yet the trend in gangsta rap continues. "Lives have been lost and people have suffered, yet the gangster rap industry is still flourishing. Society has noticed the negative influence this music has had, yet we still continue to make it succeed through number of record sales," (Giovacchini). In "Go Brooklyn!" Ferrell describes the way the media has a direct influence on the creation of the gangsta mythos. Big Ru, for instance, is a "constructed bad boy" whose story "rivaled any fairy tale on the market," (446). Taking greater social responsibility and personal responsibility, musicians and the media can work together to eradicate misconceptions and create a better world. Music has a transformative potential, and can build social bonds between disparate groups. The power of music as a unifying force should not be undermined to favor a greed-driven media model that is built on the "cliche" of the gangsta (Ferrell 446). Consumers do need to take their own responsibility for what they listen to; the blame is not with the media alone. However, many young people have yet to develop the critical listening faculties that adults should have. By taking Ferrell's approach of probing to the truth in every gangsta rapper's story and dissecting it, the media can find inspiring role models that reduce violence and promote the economic betterment of disenfranchised communities. The…

Pages: 3  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Jazz Performance: "Blues After Dark,"

Suddenly, the trumpet and the saxophone begin to diverge. Whereas they were once playing the same melody in unison, they start to "talk" to one another. Dizzie Gillespie actually walks a few steps away to symbolize the changing relationship between the two lead instruments at this moment in the song. This relationship is solidified at the end of the song with the interesting vocals. Style = BeBop Role of Piano = Stride and Comping Role of the Bass = Walking Role of the Drums = Brushing and Riding Role of the Trumpet and Saxophone = Lead and Melody Performance: "Loverman," Dizzie Gillespie (trumpet), Sonny Stitt (tenor saxophone), Lou Levy (piano), Ray Brown (bass), Gus Johnson (drums). In Belgium 1958 "Loverman" begins with Sonny Stitt, and his saxophone doles out ribbons of sound in a flourish before launching gently into the main part of the melody. This is a down tempo number, and a little slow. However, Stitt lifts up the dynamics with his playing. The mood is sad, it is a ballad ideal for a slow dance. The sax, although unaccompanied by the trumpet or any other lead instrument yet, is not quite a solo, it is more of an introduction. The bass backs him up. Style = Bebop ballad Role of Piano = comping Role of the Bass = rhythm and comping Role of the Drums = Brushing Role of the Saxophone = Lead and Melody Performance: "Blues Walk." Dizzie Gillespie Quintet Live in Belgium 1958 with Dizzy Gillespie (trumpet) Sonny Stitt (tenor saxophone), Lou Levy (piano), Ray Brown (bass), Gus Johnson (drums) The drums feature firmly here, especially at the beginning. The drummer taps in the song, at first indicating a low tempo but then quickening it for the introduction of the head instruments, saxophone and trumpet. This is a lively, upbeat introduction. The trumpet and the saxophone start together, singing loud and clear with one another for a few bars. The same phrase is repeated for another bar, connected by the drums in between. Style = BeBop Role of Piano = Stride and Comping Role of the Bass = Walking (lots of walking) Role of the Drums = Mallets, sticks, riding Role of the Trumpet and Saxophone = Lead and Melody Conclusion Dizzy Gillespie's 1958 Belgium performance is quintessential bebop. It is impossible not to appreciate and enjoy this music. Every instrument comes together in unison and…

Pages: 4  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Electronic Music the Creation and

Electric technology and music have been closely associated since the discovery of usable electronic power. As early as the 1850s, French inventors were looking into ways in which music could be recorded for posterity. However, it would not be until Thomas Edison's invention of the phonograph in 1878 that recorded music would be able to be played back at the…

Pages: 12  |  Essay  |  Style: Harvard  |  Sources: 10


Censorship in Music Censorship Under

The Spanish-born Pablo Casals (1876-1973), who enjoyed a spectacular international career as a violin and cello virtuoso and conductor, was considered to be one of the finest musicians of his day. However, he had a rather harsh assessment of rock and roll in the early 1960s, one that should be viewed through the filter of a person whose life was…

Pages: 36  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Role That Patronage (Royal, Ecclesiastical, Private) Played

¶ … role that patronage (royal, ecclesiastical, private) played in the lives of musicians and the repertoire that was composed / performed. At least three different types of case studies should be examined in terms of their most significant musicians-in-residence, its socio-cultural environment, opportunities for performance and composition, and locally preferred musical styles. One case study should be taken from…

Pages: 7  |  Case Study  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 10


Jazz Styles Analysis "Blues After Dark" Dizzie

Jazz Styles Analysis "Blues after Dark" Dizzie Gillespie's "Blues after Dark" is a striking example of the concert takes place in Belgium in 1958. It was set in a dark venue, where the true highlight is on the musicians, with no distractions in terms of other stimulus present on stage. This is obviously a later performance from Dizzie Gillespie, as…

Pages: 4  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Jazz Gillespie Live in '58: Analyzing and

Jazz Gillespie Live in '58: Analyzing and Appreciating a Historic Jazz Concert The live performance given in Belgium in 1958 by Dizzy Gillespie and some notable band mates is both historically important, helping to solidify the spread of modern jazz to Europe, and aesthetically pleasing today. Despite being a half-century old, the sounds that this group produces still sound fresh, causing almost any listener to start toe-tapping and finger-snapping. Joining Gillespie on his ubiquitous trumpet are Sonny Stitt on saxophones (tenor and alto), Lou Levy at the piano, Ray Brown on bass and Gus Johnson on the drums, and this quintet puts modern jazz through its paces with a variety of songs and sounds. The varying roles that each player and instrument has in each song demonstrates the level of mastery that each of these musicians brings to the group and the performance. Blues After Dark A mute solidly in his upward-slanting trumpet, Gillespie is joined by Stitt on the tenor sax as they begin "Blues After Dark" by playing the simple melody in unison, with Lou Levy's piano breaking in only to fill the spaces between the sparse melodic spurts provided by the fronting duo. The song gives way relatively quickly to a solo by Gillespie, during which Gus Johnson's drums become slightly more noticeable if only for their almost non-presence under the lightly brushed strokes of the restrained percussionist. Neither Johnson nor Brown ever move out of the basic rhythm section on this piece, and Levy's piano also remains primarily in the background though without the strong rhythm of a stride piano or of the bass and drums. After Gillespie's solo, throughout which Stitt stands silently to the side, the saxophonist steps to center stage for his own solo, which Gillespie punctuates with short blasts on occasion before standing aside and letting Stitt take over. Johnson has moved from brushes (or a brush) to sticks at some point, and the song picks up intensity ever so slightly under his insistence. His solo completed, Stitt steps off to join Gillespie on the sidelines while Levy enjoys a brief yet relatively tame solo, interesting becoming more predictable in its rhythm -- a heavier left hand more reliably hitting every downbeat -- before the horn players come back to the melody. Levy again fills the silences, though with les improvisation and much greater simplicity. Throughout these final repetitions of the melody,…

Pages: 4  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Jazz "Blues After Dark," Feat.

The saxophone is occasionally staccato, but mainly smooth, dancing around the bass notes. Brushes can be heard in the background, with the occasional cymbal. The saxophone solo is long, and nuanced, moving through various registers. Occasionally, Stitt packs in several notes into a bar, and sometimes fewer. There is also a trumpet solo in "Sunny Side of the Street" that starts delicately with thin high notes. The bass responds with thin, high notes. This solo does not necessarily have a lot of structure. It allows the basic structure of the song to remain…while laying on top a curiously thin upper register melody, before Gillespie changes the height of the mike. Even then, the muted trumpet works and then suddenly, unexpectedly, the vocals kick in "sunny side of the street," and both Gillespie and Stitt are singing. Performance: "Loverman," Dizzy Gillespie (trumpet), Sonny Stitt (tenor saxophone), Lou Levy (piano), Ray Brown (bass), Gus Johnson (drums). In Belgium 1958 Style = Ballad BeBop Role of Piano = Comping Role of the Bass = Comping Role of the Drums = Brushing Role of the Saxophone = Lead and Melody "Loverman" is very slow and languid, but it leaves the listener with a deep emotional impact. The title, "Loverboy," does suggest that there is a love song written here. Performance: "Blues Walk." Dizzy Gillespie Quintet Live in Belgium 1958 with Dizzy Gillespie (trumpet) Sonny Stitt (tenor saxophone), Lou Levy (piano), Ray Brown (bass), Gus Johnson (drums) Style = BeBop Role of Piano = Stride and Comping Role of the Bass = Walking Role of the Drums = Brushing and Riding; he uses mallets at the beginning in a more aggressive way Role of the Trumpet and Saxophone = Lead and Melody The first solo is the saxophone. Stitt plays a continuous flow of notes, barely stopping to breathe. The piano accompanies with some punctuation. A walking bass line also plays sixteenth notes. In fact, the title of the song could easily refer to the walking bass line. Toward the end of the saxophone solo, the phrasing changes briefly and it has an overall improvised feel. Conclusion This performance was enlightening in the sense that is shows the role of different instruments in the bebop jazz performance. I especially appreciated the way that in "Blues After Dark," the song begins and ends in much the same way. The effect like alpha and omega makes the…

Pages: 4  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 1


Listening "Blues After Dark." Belgium

Role(s) of bass: The bass serves to provide a deep baseline, keeping the overall sound downbeat and somber. Role(s) of drums (including sticks or brushes or mallets): Use of brushes at beginning creates a very light sound as the sax plays. Role(s) of horn players: The alto saxophone is the primary instrument in this piece. Much of the time, the other players are not even touching their instruments in fact. In Greater Detail: For your selected solo within this song: Identify the Solo: Saxophone played by Sonny Stitt How did the solo progress from beginning to end? The solo begins the song with a downbeat, torch song sound to it, picking up tempo to the point where it is a series of runs before the song ends. Was the solo successful? Why or why not? The solo was not successful because it took up the entirety of the song and did not allow for the real emotion to carry through, although it was successful at the start of the song. What was your emotional response to it? The beginning of the song was emotional in that it carried a deep, depressing sound to it. It seemed that the player was missing someone or lacking something but then when the sax player continued into his runs, that feeling of sadness disappeared into a complex series of notes which confused the emotion. 4. "Blues Walk" Belgium 1958 ~ Dizzy Gillespie (trumpet), Sonny Stitt (tenor and alto sax), Lou Levy (piano), Ray Brown (bass), and Gus Johnson (drums) Style(s) of the piece: blues; upbeat jazz (Afro-Cuban Jazz) Role(s) of piano: It is hard to make out the piano amid the other more powerful sounds, indicating that its function is to create a rainbow of musical textures until the point of his own solo. Role(s) of bass: The bass keeps the upbeat tempo and serves to dovetail the prevailing drum. Role(s) of drums (including sticks or brushes or mallets): The drum is very prevalent in this song, setting the tempo and elevating it to a jubilant song. Role(s) of horn players: The horn and sax perform the function of the vocals of the piece, singing with their instruments. In Greater Detail: For your selected solo within this song: Identify the Solo: How did the solo progress from beginning to end? Which soloist(s) heard in class did it remind you of? Was the solo successful?…

Pages: 4  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Music There Is an Old

In fact, contemporary music can be a way of bringing a subculture to society's awareness, a way of legitimizing a subculture. Music is an essential thread in the fabric of every culture and subculture. It memorializes the culture, distills its essence, and offers it a path to the future. How does one judge the cultural strength of any particular style of contemporary music? One can look to anthropology, which evaluates customs according to their ability to foster the emotional involvement of participants. It should communicate clearly the message and meaning of the music -- which should have relevance to that particular culture. It should foster group identity and social cohesion, a sense of belonging, and it should have integrity. If it has true integrity, it will inspire new compositions and further strengthen the culture. A good example of contemporary music that served our culture well were the anthems and songs sung on 9/11/2001. A few songs were chosen again and again at ceremonies, gatherings, commemorations and fundraisers, and these songs had an even greater impact than the American flags that were waved in so many towns, in so many homes across the country. Although we have a national anthem, and a beautiful one, simpler songs often won the day. "God Bless America" could not be more homespun in its words and simple melody. Like a poem of the people, it inspires and reverberates through the cultural fabric. Another song that was almost always performed was "America the Beautiful." The melody is simple and memorable, the words evoke the majesty and myth that is America -- her spacious skies, her amber waves of grain -- and the song inspires emotions that very few Americans can resist. High-minded classicists may say these are not truly great pieces of composition, but they satisfy all the requirements of true folk music, of music that has meaning. One of the most interesting aspects of contemporary music is that it is so inventive. It is not bound by strict forms -- as sonatas or symphonies, ballads or hymns once were. Contemporary music can use any instrument from around the world, as well as invented instruments created by computers and digital synthesizers. For instance, the genre called 'new classical music' tries to infuse classical music with the energy of contemporary culture. New classicists may compose for traditional instruments like violins and flutes, but they compose for the…

Pages: 4  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Charlie Parker Music: The Music

These houses also normally employed a solo piano player who was called "Professor" by the girls. Jelly Roll Morton had also taken up employment as a professor and that had resulted in his being kicked out from his family. The importance of New Orleans as the center for Jazz ended when Storyville was closed down by the Navy. But, by…

Pages: 20  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Music Slow Hora/Freylekhs the Klezmer Conservatory Band

¶ … Music Slow Hora/Freylekhs The Klezmer Conservatory Band (Klezmer)Dancing in the Aisles "Slow Hora/Freylekhs" is a traditional Klezmer song performed by the Klezmer Conservatory Band. The song represents the style and instrumentation of Eastern European Jewish music, and includes the strong representation of woodwinds. The instrumentation may include clarinet, oboe, and bassoon with the percussive punctuation added by bass instruments. Actual percussive elements are present but kept to a subtle minimum to allow the woodwinds to carry most of the song; the melodic lead is carried by the highest-pitched woodwind, which may be a clarinet. 26.E Baiana Clara Nunes (Brazil) Meus Momentos: Clara Nunes Clara Nunes performs the quintessential samba in "E Baiana." Here, African beats and African vocals blend with some European instrumentation including the guitar on top. The song is very danceable and shows how African music influenced Brazilian music. "E Baiana" is also highly percussive and includes the shakers and syncopated clapping at the end of the song as well as the pervasive and persistent drumming that make the hips move. Also the background vocals and notably African in nature. 27.Malaguena Salerosa 4:13 Rodrigo, Remedio Flores (Spain) Flamenco Caravan This Flamenco song starts as many other Flamenco songs do with acoustic solo guitar, which is characteristically intricate and complex. The odd vocalization punctuates the guitar solo. The melody changes, ranging between somber and mellow to perky. The guitarist also accomplishes his own percussion. However, the quintessentially Flamenco foot-tapping is integral to the song. The vocals come in relatively late. The vocalist is a male with a very chiseled voice. This sounds like a love song. 28.Ishar 5:05 Fairuz (Lebenon) Beirut Pop This Lebanese song starts off with some interesting organ sounds, and reminds me of something from an Eastern European wedding. The vocals are very sultry, and the singer draws out each word, enunciating the Arabic very clearly. There are some background vocals, as well as accordion or an accordion-like instrument. Although I don't like the vocals, this song is captivating and mysterious. 29.Hristiankova Kopanitsa 3:29 Ivo Papasov & His Orchestra (former Yugoslavia) Balkanology 30.Rind De Hore 8:16 Taraf de Haidouks (Roumania) Latcho Drom The traditional music of the Roma people is well-represented here in "Rind De Hore" by the Romanian group Taraf de Haidouks. The song was featured in the film about gypsies (Roma) people called Latcho Drom. Instrumentation includes flute, violin, and some kind…

Pages: 2  |  Journal  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Music Business

¶ … Right to Listen for Free One of the most controversial issues in the music business today is the issue of selling music through the Internet. The ongoing and evolving process of selling and disseminating music through the Internet has provoked a number of economic as well as artistic debates for the music business and for the computer and technology businesses that allow such technology to be accessed. This paper will address some of these concerns with a particular focus on the anti-trust issues that have arisen over the course of this debate. First of all, the issue of disseminating music over the Internet provokes the perplexing question of who really 'owns' the commercial product of a pieces of music, anyway? Is the owner the person or persons who simply hear the tune and keep humming it? Is the owner the musician who produces the product? Or are the owners the music companies musicians have signed artistic rights to? Clearly, to survive musicians must be able to charge for the product they produce, and the companies have control over the specifics of how to market that product. But once a song is in the public sphere, do not consumers have a right to 'pass on' that music product in ways that they see fit, even if those ways may inhibit the sales of recordings of that music? The issue of musical downloads on the Internet also raises the question of numerous anti-trust issues. How can the music industry and recording labels stem the spread of specific kinds technologies, produced by other computer or technological companies, which allow individuals to download music free of charge? These recording labels and musicians wish for those individuals to pay for the privilege of downloading and listening to such music, yet such controls necessitate a kind of collaboration between industries that is unprecedented and possibly in danger of violating anti-trust laws. Of course, music has never been an easily controlled commodity because of the nature of the artistic medium itself. Even before the invention of the World Wide Web and Napster, the question of controlling music as a commodity has been an issue for recording labels and musicians. 'Bootlegged' recording of concerts has always been a problem for musicians when selling concert tickets and tapes. This has also been true of the circulation of taped music from the radio and CDs. Even simply the…

Pages: 3  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Role of Viola Da Gamba as a Solo Instrument in the Sixteenth Century

Viola Da Gamba Terms, Structure, and Origins Viola Da Gamba as a Solo Instrument Decline of the Viola Da Gamba ROLE OF THE VIOLA DA GAMBA AS A SOLO INSTRUMENT IN THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY The viola da gamba, a member of the viol family, first appeared in Europe during the late fifteenth century. Its popularity soared during the Renaissance and…

Pages: 7  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Capsule From the 1960's Peers,

Other items such as handheld calculators, ATMs, bar code scanners, and artificial hearts also were invented in the 1960s. The 60s were a decade that presented us with many lessons to learn. There is a lot of evidence of creative expression. This period was also a time of great change and transition. We must also not forget that this era was very violent. Many people suffered injuries and lost their lives as part of their struggle for various forms of human rights or protection. The 60s showed us how much we can achieve when we are united and focused about social causes. The 60s showed us how we are not alone when we stand up for ourselves and others. The 60s opened our eyes to each other and to the world. We began considering ourselves as players on a larger stage, the galactic stage, as we began manned missions into space. The 60s, more than anything, I think, showed humanity its potential for greatness and for tragedy. It was a decade of great achievements, and great failures & losses. There many lost heroes of this era that went on to live on in the memories of the future generations. In short, the 1960s were epic in magnitude. A lesson we can learn from this time is that humanity is powerful and there is a persistent tension between our positive and negative potentials, both of which are infinite. It was a decade of extremes, of transformational change and bizarre contrasts: flower children and assassins, idealism and alienation, rebellion and backlash. For many in the massive post-World War II baby boom generation, it was both the best of times and the worst of times. (Walsh, 2010) References: BBC News. (2013). The 1960s -- World Events. BBC, Web, Available from: http://news.bbc.co.uk/dna/place-lancashire/plain/A3768537. 2013 February 12. Dikkers, S. (1999). The Onion Presents: Our Dumb Century -- 100 Years of Headlines from America's Finest News Source. New York, NY: Three Rivers Press. Kurlansky, M. (2005). 1968: The Year that Rocked the World. New York, NY: Random House Trade Paperbacks. Walsh, K.T. (2010). The 1960s: Polarization, Cynicism, and the Youth Rebellion. U.S. News & World Report, Web, Available from: http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2010/03/12/the-1960s-polarization-cynicism-and-the-youth-rebellionredirect. 2013 February 05.…

Pages: 5  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Philip Glass Biography Philip Glass

" There also was the curious effect Glass' music had on the listener's sense of time. The constant beat and subtly shirting rhythms over a static harmonic structure tended to hypnotize and make the listener lose track of time. However, Glass' music soon showed signs of becoming decidedly larger (some of it, like Music in Twelve Parts ran for hours),…

Pages: 24  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


54th Symphony

Garden State Philharmonic Presents: Master Works IV Sitting quietly reading my program for the evening, I notice the first piece will be the Overture of the Bartered Bride. I do remember that this is a piece from a comic opera by Bohemian composer Bedrich Semtana. Most overtures are written as an afterthought of an opera but Semtana thought so much of the lovely story of the opera (a love story that comes out with a positive twist) that he wrote the overture before he wrote the rest of the opera. I am anxious to experience this piece with the Garden State Philharmonic. The lights are dimming and Maestro Anthony LaGruth is advancing towards the podium. A thunderous applause erupts and Maestro LaGruth turns to take an appreciated bow. He turns and is now tapping his baton impatiently, calling the entire orchestra to attention. The quiet is then interrupted by strings; violins, cellos as if there were thousands of bees singing happy melodies. The quiet sounds now burst into a forte; full sounding music of dance and merriment. I am enjoying this happy, uplifting music with great fervor. The cellos are now leading the orchestra giving a heavy, boisterous sound, including drums. The lighter violin strings are playing giving way to drums and going back and forth from wind instruments and then drums ushering in the light dance music again. The maestro is weaving back and forth as he passionately brings full orchestra into a resounding conclusive forte. The audience is now whistling and applauding as Maestro LaGruth is bowing to the audience and then to his famous orchestra. The Bartered Bride was first performed May 30, 1866 in Prague. It is a lively entertaining story of a young rural girl who outwits her family and her marriage broker to marry the son of a wealthy landowner whom she loves instead of marrying his half-witted brother whom her family wants her to marry. Bedrich Smetana was a pioneer of a music style which identified with his country's aspirations of independence. In his homeland of Czechoslovakia he is known as the father of Czech music. He was a gifted pianist and had his first concert at the age of six. He started his career in Prague but became entangled in the politics of the Prague uprising in 1846. He then left for Sweden and in Gothenburg became a teacher and conductor. This…

Pages: 4  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Robert Schumann's Dichterliebe Song 4

¶ … Robert Schumann's Dichterliebe Song #4 Robert Schumann's Dichterliebe: Song Musical compositions have long sought to emulate the human voice. This is exactly the case in the Song 4 of Robert Schumann's Dichterliebe. Not only does the score emulate the sound, tone, and pitch of the vocalist, but the actual composition mirrors the rise and bittersweet ending of the…

Pages: 7  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Development of Pierre Schaeffer's Musique Concrete

¶ … PIERRE SCHAEFFER'S MUSIQUE CONCRETE Pierre Schaeffer succeeded far beyond his expectations in that he not only was able to conceal the object sources of his musical compositions from the listener but simultaneously for a time, concealed the very primitive base of his musical compositions from other composers who in that period post-war 1948 adjudged Schaeffer not to be…

Pages: 25  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 7


Tchaikovsky and Romantic Period

Tchaikovsky and Romantic Period Tchaikovsky The artifacts which reveal the most about our society give us information not only about the culture in which it was created and the place the creator held within that society, but also show us a reflection of that culture through the eyes of the creator. Some of the greatest pieces of music are also…

Pages: 7  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Huge Difference Between Japanese

¶ … huge difference between Japanese anime and Japanese drama and the difference can be seen by the juxtaposition. As a start, the anime shows a boy going past various musicians. The musicians are drawn in cartoon style. We hear their music. We are briefly told something about the pedestrian. The entire is a 1-minute plot in naive outline with…

Pages: 3  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Chaucer and Dryden Dedicated Odes

Because the poet chooses verbs regularly delegated to the realm of human experience, music becomes anthropomorphised. Furthermore, because these verbs tend to be uplifting in nature, music becomes deified. The third stanza describes the war cries of the trumpet, which "excites us to arms," (line 26). Possessing and providing "shrill notes of anger," the trumpet is a metaphor for military might. Its "double double beat" serves as warning to troops: "hark, the foes come," (lines 29; 31). Using a natural metaphor, Dryden also compares the trumpet to thunder. The sound of the trumpet hearkens to the deep war cry of the gods, thunder. Dryden also reminds us that the drum serves a similar purpose as the trumpet: "the thund'ring drum," (line 30). Switching gears in Stanza 4, Dryden depicts the flute as a "soft complaining" instrument (line 33). The flute's sound can be melancholy and thus Dryden characterizes the flute as whispering dirges' "dying notes," (line 34). The lute's songs sing the "woes of hopeless lovers," (line 35). By personifying the flute and conveying its tone in terms of death and despair, Dryden defines the instrument with metaphor. Likewise, the "sharp" sound of the violin epitomizes "jealous pangs," "fury," and "frantic indignation" in Stanza 5 (lines 38-9). Music conveys mood, and the poet verbally paints this mood using skilfully chosen words. Dryden reserves the organ as the final instrument delineated through metaphor. Because it was Saint Cecilia's instrument of choice and that which she used to speak with God, the organ deserves several stanzas of praise. The organ exists beyond all other instruments, including the human voice: "what art can teach / What human voice can reach / the sacred organ's praise," (lines 42-44). The organ's melody is the epitome of prayer; its notes "inspire holy love," as they did for the legendary Cecilia (line 45). Hearkening to the saint's story, Dryden details the organ's divine qualities. Notes produced by the organ "wing their Heav'nly ways" upward; they carry prayer and have the potential to touch "the choirs above," (lines 46-7). Comparing the organ to they myth of Orpheus leading "the savage race" and to the lyre uprooting trees, Dryden again elevates the organ to the penultimate musical instrument (lines 48-50). For when an angel heard the transcendent tune of Cecilia's organ, it mistook "earth for Heav'n," (line 54). So ambrosial is the organ's song that it transforms and transmutes…

Pages: 3  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Gamelan Music Overview- the Gamelan

It does take more than one exposure to be able to pick out the layers, or even the harmony because of the intricate nature and complexity of the style. Within these orchestra "themes," though, no performance is the same, because the individual musicians are trained to improvise, dialog, and create a unique performance based on their own emotional experience at the time. In addition, the gamelan experience is also enhanced both visually and emotionally by the use of puppets. These puppet shows accentuate Javanese myth, and also introduce younger listeners to their past. Examples of Gamelan Styles 1. The Soundscape Gamelan At Soundscape: http://www.soundscapemusicproject.com/music/gamelan/index.html 2. Compositions, technique, world Balinese music: http://www.dmoz.org/Arts/Music/Styles/R/Regional_and_Ethnic/Gamelan/ 3. Traditional Examples of gamelan: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hlap5WulHOw 4. Education presentation with audio examples: http:/ / education.northumberland.gov.uk/music/.../Gamelan/Gamelan.ppt Bibliography "Akira Fan Site." January 2012. Akira. Web. June 2012. . "Balinese and Javanese Gamelan." 7 October 2005. Sinisterfrog. Web. June 2012. . Brown, A. "Creating Her Own Destiny: Anggun Cipta Samsi." June 2009. Gadfly Online. Web. May 2012. . Gold, L. Music in Bali: Experiencing Music, Expressing CUlture. New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Print. Kirman, P. "Robert Macht on the Javanese Gamelon." 28 May 1999. Inside World Music. Web. June 2012. . Lentz, D. The Famelan Music of Java and Bali. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 1965. Print. Martin, B. Listening to the Future. Chicago, IL: Open Court Publishing, 1997. Print. Peterman, L. "Indonesian Music." July 2008. trumpet.sdsu.edu. Web. May 2012. . Prikosusilo, B. "Indonesia Needs the Harmony of the Gamelan." 22 February 2011. Jakarta Globe. Web. May 2012. . Spiller, H. Gamelan Music of Indonesia. New York: Routledge, 2008. Print. Sumarsam. Gamelan: Cultural Interaction and Musical Development in Central Java. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1995. Print. Susilo, H. "Enculturation and Cross-Cultural Experiences in Teaching Indonesian Gamelan." July 2010. Gamlean.org. Web. June 2012. . Tenzer, M. Balinese Music. North Clarendon, VT: Turtle Publications, 2011. Print. "The Gamelan in Contemporary Music." March 2011. Soundtrack.net. Web. June 2012. .…

Pages: 6  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 6


World Music of the United Kingdom

¶ … Music Interview Report: "Martin" Martin was born in the United Kingdom. Most of his family comes from the Midlands, around the industrial city of Birmingham. Much of Birmingham was destroyed by the German air bombs during the Blitz, and this recent history was still a potent memory for members of the previous generation, as the city was rebuilt.…

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 5


Amazing Contributions of Blind Musicians to Music

Amazing Contributions of Blind Musicians to Music Of the five senses, sight is perhaps the most valued of all by many people. In many cases, when a person is deprived of this important sense, the other senses tend to try to compensate for the loss by becoming more sensitive. It is not surprising, then, that some blind people seek vocations…

Pages: 5  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


General Music and Genres

¶ … Music and Genres List 3 music Genres that most socially and politically influential over time. Music plays a critical role in the social and political spheres of the United States. Various music genres were most socially and politically influential in relation to the history of the United States. Three critical music genres that were socially and politically influential…

Pages: 5  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4


Humanities Role of Music in

Most of the drums are made from wood while some can also be clay pots or shells of turtles. Drums are not only used for composing music but they have several uses. For instance, Africans use talking drums to announce the news of birth of a child, death of a person or information about any public event. Interesting thing about…

Pages: 5  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4


Shared Characteristics of Music and Dance Capoeira House Dance

Capoeira and House Dance/Music Capoeira and House Dance and Music The slave trade between Africa and the Americas had a significant cultural impact on music and dance, which can be seen in traditional capoeira -- the martial art developed by Brazilian slaves that incorporates song and dance, as well as house dance and b-boying. These three different styles share similar characteristics that include dance moves, the dance environment, and music. Capoeira has its roots in African foot fighting which was a culture cultivated by Brazilian slaves. Capoeira blends dance, music, rituals, and fighting, all of which have roots in Africa and in the individual tribes the slaves were abducted from. Capoeira was developed in the "senzalas" where slaves were kept ("History of Capoeira"). Traditionally, capoeira is set up as a "battle" between two individuals. In a traditional capoeira showdown, two dancers compete head to head. One of the dancers assumes the role of the slave, whereas the other assumes the role of the master, which emphasizes the context in which capoeira was developed as well as allows capoeiristas to vent their frustrations and practice the martial art (Rousseau). Capoeira quickly became recognized as a threat to white slave holders, and white society in general, and was eventually outlawed; however, this did not stop individuals from practicing the martial art-dance style. Capoeira was effective in concealing the martial arts aspect of its style through music and dance. Capoeira dancing takes place in a roda, a circle of composed of musicians, singers, and dancers. Forming a roda requires participation from all participants (Brown). In the roda, music is used to set the tempo of the dance. Singing, also referred to as ladainhna, provides the narrative for the dance. Singing usually incorporates a call and response element that is referred to as chula (Brown). Capoeira dancing is structured similarly to the call-and-response singing as the movements are both offensive and defensive. Capoeira dancing focuses on basic kicks, sweeps, and head strikes, which can be countered through evasive moves and rolls. Capoeira dancing begins with ginga, which is a triangular, rhythmic step; this step is comparable to the footwork often seen in boxing. Other basic capoeira moves include the au, which is a cartwheel move; balanca, which is a side-to-side step used to prevent the opponent from anticipating the next strike; bananeira, a handstand move; macaco, which is commonly referred to as a monkey…

Pages: 4  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Music Enjoyment Some of the Things I

Music Enjoyment Some of the things I learned during this course go well beyond music per se. I have come to be more comfortable with how and why the past truly participated in creating the present. The past cultural foundations are not just isolated window of time that we as students should know about to complete out educations. The cliche about the past being "prologue" to the present is more than a cliche to me now. Prior to this class I have taken history classes and have become fascinated with the origins of and early stages of art, politics, language, culture. Added to my knowledge now, the history and evolution of music forms and styles. I have come to be familiar with many composers through this class and have, on my own, conducted some research into these musical icons. We are so bombarded with media in this era of history, it takes opening one's mind to the past to fully appreciate how the world looked and sounded in the ancient world -- and why things evolved into what we have today. I have learned to be open to understanding how history, even ancient history, links us with the present. When I took philosophy courses I became very interested in the ancient Greeks, especially Plato and his writings for and about Socrates. That was the beginning of the field of philosophy. And now I understand that the Romans adopted much of the basics of Greek music; as time went on the Greek lyre and aulos gave way to horn instruments in Rome. And today we have so many amazing musical instruments -- we live in a richly musical time. Question #2: My favorite composer that I came to learn about and be fascinated by was George Gershwin. The iconic composer of course is among the most prolific of songwriters, but though I was familiar with some of his music prior to the class, I am now far more aware of the litany of great music this American composer has created. All the times I have sung "Summertime…and the livin' is easy…" as a soloist and in choirs, and I loved singing and hearing it because the music and the lyrics are so stunningly beautiful and evocative. My all time favorite Gershwin composition by far is Rhapsody in Blue. I remember my sister had the tune on an LP and I used…

Pages: 2  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


America Popular Music

America Popular Music The objective of this work is to discuss popular music in America today as well as to examine today's musicians. This work will historically place today's music in context and will discuss the style of music of today. Popular music, "...reflects a kaleidoscope of contributions, a cross-fertilization of styles and a blending of dreams. It could hardly be otherwise in this nation of immigrants." (Starr and Waterman, nd) Just as America is the melting pot of many nations the many and various forms of music that traveled with people as they immigrated to America is integrated within the fabric of American music. Starr and Waterman state that the United States "is a perfect musical laboratory: take people from every corner of the globe, give them freedom to create. Distribute their effort: by sheet music, phonograph, radio- or, for the younger ready: by Blu-ray Disc, mp3, Internet stream. And what results! European ballads recast with African polyrhythmic textures or blended with a Cuban-flavored habanera (boldfaced terms are defined in the glossary) or a more "refined" rumba. "Cold" bop. "Hot" jazz. "Acid" rock. "Gangsta" rap." (Starr and Waterman, nd) I. SOURCES of POPULAR MUSIC in AMERICA Starr and Water man writes that American popular music was "almost entirely European in character...until the middle of the 19th century..." (nd) Because the English language was dominant in the United States the music of the Europeans "established early on a kind of mainstream around which other styles circulated." (Starr and Waterman, nd) Influencing early popular music were Irish, Scottish and Italian songs." (Starr and Waterman, nd) French settlers influenced music in North American and the Caribbean and millions immigrated from Ireland and Germany followed by waves of migration which included Cajun fiddling, Jewish klezmer music and the Polish polka, all contributing to the popular mainstream music. According to Starr and Waterman: "The genesis of African-American music in the United States involved two closely related processes. The first of these was syncretism, the selective blending of traditions derived from Africa and Europe. The second was the creation of institutions that became important centers of black musical life -- the family, the church, the voluntary association, the school, and so on." (Starr and Waterman, nd) Certain features of African music form the core of African-American music and, by extension, of American popular music as a whole." (Starr and Waterman, nd) Included in African-American music…

Pages: 3  |  Essay  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 4


Music of Ludwig Van Beethoven

Beethoven The Music of Ludwig Van Beethoven Ludwig Van Beethoven was a German composer born on December 17th, 1770. However, there is a debate about whether he was born on the 16th or the 17th, as babies were traditionally baptized within 24 hours of being born and his official baptism took place on the 17th (Biography.com, 2012). He died on March 26th, 1827, after his health had completely deteriorated and his hearing was completely gone. The fact that he was deaf is very well-known; he somehow managed to write his best work without being able to hear a sound. Beethoven started demonstrating interest in music early on in life; while his father was known to be a less than stellar court singer with a strong alcohol problem, his grandfather was one of Bonn's most famous musicians (Biography.com, 2012). History has it that Ludwig would be forced to spend hours at the piano while his father criticized and beat him at every mistake. He made his first debut at 7 years old -- his father had declared that he was six years old, which was a source of confusion for Beethoven later on life (Prevot, 2001). After that, Beethoven went on to study with Gottlob Neefe, with whom he studied organ and composition. He published his first work, 9 variations in C minor, in 1782 (Prevot, 2001). Beethoven's Work Unlike other composers who often stayed within on particular genre or style, Beethoven's body of work extends itself over many different musical styles. While he has written beautiful piano pieces, such as concertos and sonatas, he has also made his mark through impressive symphonies, string quartets and an opera. His most widely acclaimed pieces include the Piano Sonata op.13 in C minor (Sonata Pathetique), Piano Sonata op. 27 no.2 in C. sharp mino (the Moonlight Sonata), Missa Solemnis, String Quartet no. 14, Symphony no.5, Symphony no.9 and Fidelio, his only opera (Biography.com, 2012; Dalhaus & Whittall, 1991). Of course, the list goes on, as Beethoven's body of work is immense and includes many masterpieces still heard in concert halls across the world today. Beethoven's body of work is often divided into three periods: Early, Middle and Late periods. His first period, referred to as Early, was influenced by other composers such as Mozart while the Middle period is characterized by his debilitating loss of hearing (Biography.com, 2012). However, the disease led him…

Pages: 3  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Music in the Upper Grades

An association of music and math has, in fact, long been noted. Creating and performing music promotes self-expression and provides self-gratification while giving pleasure to others. In medicine, increasing published reports demonstrate that music has a healing effect on patients. For all these reasons, it deserves strong support in our educational system, along with the other arts, the sciences, and…

Pages: 4  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Irish Music Is Interesting Because

When Irish people immigrated to the United States, they brought their music with them. Many of these people moved to the South. Because of this, traditional southern music has a lot in common with Irish music (Wikipedia). The Irish also developed "set dancing" to their music, which is a lot like American square dancing (Wikipedia). Both are done to the music of fiddling, a traditional Irish way of playing the violin. Traditional Irish music is still performed today in pubs and concert halls, and many modern Irish musicians, including rock musicians, include things they have learned from traditional Irish music in their hit songs. Irish music became much more popular in the United States after the Broadway show "Riverdance" opened. This show combines traditional Irish music and dancing in a modern setting (Wikipedia). SOURCES 'Classification of Musical Instruments," in Online Music Encyclopedia (OME). Accessed via the Internet 9/16/05. "Music of Ireland," in Wikipedia. Accessed via the Internet 9/16/05.

Pages: 1  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Music Therapy According to Gary Ansdell, the

Music Therapy According to Gary Ansdell, the music "product" created through Creative Music Therapy is like a "magic mirror" that reflects "physical and emotional vistas," (128). The role of music in therapy has been explored in formal and informal contexts because, as Langer states, "most people connect feelings with music," (213). While listeners and musicians both undeniably and unavoidably associate emotions with music, music in itself is not necessarily emotive. Kivy describes the difference between expressing emotions that are actually there and being expressive of an objective emotional condition (257). Music by itself is a tool, and its instruments are means through which people can express their personal emotional states. However, the use of music in a therapeutic session works mainly because of the communication created through the client-therapist connection. Music is not just a form of self-expression, which would make music ego-centric and allow the client to remain insular. Ansdell emphasizes the importance of listening for the therapeutic process to be effective. Langer describes the various potential functions of music in a therapeutic context. First, music can be a form of pleasurable sensation. However, as Langer notes, many musical expressions are deliberately discordant and therefore not purely pleasurable. Therefore, music cannot be used in a therapeutic context as a means by which to evoke pleasure in a depressed client. Second, music can evoke an emotional response, any emotional response (211). Music can cause the heart rate to increase or decrease depending on tempo, for instance. Yet the enduring emotional and physiological effects of listening to music are questionable at best. Referring to scientific experiments, Langer states that music's "somatic effects are transient, and its moral hangovers or uplifts seem to be negligible," (212). Thus, listening to music in a therapeutic setting may not evoke any healing results. Two other potential functions of music in the therapeutic setting include playing music as a form of self-expression, and using the product of that self-expression as a symbolic code. Even here, Langer notes weaknesses in music therapy theory. For example, playing music allows for self-expression but more importantly, music demonstrates an "exposition of feeling," (221). The semantics underlying the musical composition may be as important, or more important, than the cathartic effects of self-expression that many music therapists advocate Ansdell agrees and questions the "almost unquestioned assumption that music is a straightforward expression of feelings," (124). Kivy calls the same unquestioned assumption…

Pages: 3  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Music Make You Fee Strung Out Granted,

¶ … Music Make You Fee Strung Out Granted, I am by no means a fan of classical music. Yet as a music aficionado, I have found that there is very little music I can experience live that I do not connect with on some basic level. Perhaps it is the nuances of live music, the acoustics involved, the reaction from the crowd, as well as the element of performance augmenting the mere playing of music. It is more than a simple auditory experience, which is why I am not altogether surprised that I did not thoroughly dislike the recent performance of the Johannes String Quartet playing at Town Hall as part of the People's Symphony Concerts on Sunday, April 7. I must admit, I was partially drawn to this particular performance because of the nature of Johannes String Quartet. They have garnered quite a reputation as classical musicians, with a string of accolades and performances at major venues across the country. More enticing still was the fact that the quartet is made up entirely of strings, with Soovin Kim and Jessica Lee on the violin, Choong-Jin Chang on the viola and Peter Stumpf playing cello. In the form of music that I listen to most often, strings carry a haunting, foreboding sound which has always appealed to me. Even though this application of these instruments is not always realized in classical music, I was pleased to see that more than one of the pieces the musicians played incorporated certain elements of the type of sting performances I am partial to. Still, one of the more disappointing facets about this performance, to me, at least, was the crowd reaction. True enough, classical music is supposed to be reserved and 'sophisticate', and attracts an audience that is typically difficult to impress and would rather listen than actually feel the music. Yet there were certain passages of some of the pieces played in which the musicians attacked their instruments with a degree of ferocity that even impressed me. Proper decorum in such venues is to wait until the end of the performance to issue applause. Yet the entire feel of the afternoon could have been greatly enhanced if the crowd had been more of a participant, and less of a reserved spectator in the music -- which isd generally the case in more popular and contemporary forms of music. As the preceding…

Pages: 3  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0

 1 2 3 . . . Last ›

 

Disclaimer