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Malpractice in Advanced Nursing Practice

If a nurse specialist, her conduct should be compared with the reasonable practice of a similar or equivalent specialist. In addition, the courts recognized the extent of her role in patient care. While she may not modify the course of treatment set by the physician, she may consult nurse supervisors or other physicians to discuss her difference in view from…

Pages: 10  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 8


Managing Futility in Oncology Settings Partnerships in Peril

MANAGING FUTILITY IN ONCOLOGY SETTINGS; PARTNERSHIPS IN PERIL ABSTRACT Ideally, doctors and nurses work as a team to try to achieve a similar, overall goal: Contribute treatment to foster improvement in patients' health. In consideration of contemporary concerns in this area, this proposed study primarily aims to examine an aspect of the medical professional that requires a partnership approach, the…

Pages: 10  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: Harvard  |  Sources: 10


Nurse Practitioners' Autonomy the Current Role of

Nurse Practitioners' Autonomy The current role of nurse practitioners in the United States will need to be upgraded significantly in the near future for two important reasons. For one, as components of the new Affordable Care Act (ACA) become law, and the Act covers an additional 32 million Americans who will need healthcare, there will be a critical shortage of…

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 6


Nursing Education Has Come a

During my course of study, I intend to familiarize myself with two areas of research that interest me the most: anesthesia and midwifery. I do not currently intend to specialize, but may later choose to do so if I feel my skills would be developed best by focusing in one of these core areas of research. There are several important issues in contemporary nursing that affect all nurse practitioners, and ultimately all patients. The issue that has weighed most heavily on my mind lately is the relatively slow process of transitioning towards electronic medical records. I understand this is largely a regulatory and administrative issue, but as a nurse practitioner, I will also be impacted by the choices made my institution. In the future, I expect that there will be more uniformity in the use of electronic medical records. Right now, I fear that electronic medical records are not being used to their fullest potential to prevent patient error and facilitate our practice as nurses. While there are federal guidelines and new regulations related to the use of medical records, there has been much reluctance among health care practitioners to embrace information technology. Much of the resistance comes from physicians, but I have also witnessed my colleagues in nursing view electronic medical records with suspicion. Some administrators have expressed concern that they cannot make the transition to electronic medical records because they have yet to receive adequate guidance and the ability to train employees. The expense of training employees, and the time we need to take from our daily practice also merits concern. However, I think it is important to make the transition soon. I am certain that electronic medical records and their implications for health care will be addressed during the Doctor of Nursing Practice program of study, as it will become a major clinical methodology shift. Thank you for your consideration.…

Pages: 2  |  Admission Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Nursing Law and Ethics

Nursing Law and Ethics Name two (2) functions of the Nurses Board that are relevant to you as an Enrolled Nurse. 1.Centralized and universal licensure. 2.development and enforcements of legal responsibilities and practice rule of nurses. State two (2) contributions Florence Nightingale made to healthcare. The development of nursing as educated role. 2. Establishment and precedence of professionalism in nursing.…

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 4


Physicians and Registered Nurses Is

Furthermore, the difference between nurses and GP in diagnosis was mostly in diseases where doctors themselves may also face diagnostic difficulties (Al-Almaei et al. 2000)." The level of communication and the relationship between the doctors and the nurses was good. This also contributed to the agreement amongst the nurses and physicians because the nurses felt comfortable giving a diagnosis and suggesting treatment (Al-Almaei et al. 2000). Exploring this relationship is important in third world countries where there is a shortage of both doctors and nurses (Al-Almaei et al. 2000). Having the two work together and learn form one another improves the quality of healthcare that the patient receives. In addition, such an environment provides nurses with positive outcomes. They learned new skill sets and interacted with physicians in a relaxed atmosphere because the physicians were unaware of the study. Overall, this particular study encourages nurses to get additional education so that they can better serve patients and assist doctors in a more effective manner. The study concluded that the project reinforces 'the role of the nurse practitioners as health care providers with limited resources, able to help people, but who must refer to the local health center for guidance and medical expertise. With organized training, none of the nurses missed any life-threatening conditions (Al-Almaei et al. 2000)." Discussion and Conclusion The purpose of this discussion was to provide a description of current research, synthesis, demonstrations and other projects that have resulted in positive nurse physician relationships. More specifically the discussion focused on the relationship between the two as it relates to increases in nurse satisfaction, decreases in nurse turnover, better working environment, and better patient outcomes with an emphasis on patient safety. Our research found two descriptions of the relationship between nurses in physicians. The first report discussed the relationship between RNs and physicians on a setting where they are collaborating and consulting. We found that in an ideal situation the nurse and the collaborating doctor work in the same facility. The research also suggests that the physician view the nurse as an associate rather than a subordinate. The findings reveal that the physician should also have an understanding of the types of responsibilities the RN is ailing and able to handle. When these issues are addressed appropriately, the outcome is positive for the nurse and physician. In addition, the quality of care the patient receives is improved. In the…

Pages: 8  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Advanced Practice Roles in Nursing

This was a viable lesson in community health nursing for me as the treatment of choice tends to be limited by a patient's economic condition (Mason, 2013). Leadership attributes you currently possess, and attributes you may need to develop I am a team builder; a participative climate is defined by collaborative efforts. As a leader, I tend to guide my…

Pages: 8  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 8


Nursing Professional Boundaries There Are

Role Development and Role Boundaries The nurse leaders draw professionals from the best utilizing the most appropriate management theories to develop an individual management style and performance. In addition, the nurse leader will act with the assumption that nurses and other professionals wish to attain competence, which if they receive the motivation, they will achieve it, in addition to higher…

Pages: 8  |  Essay  |  Style: Harvard  |  Sources: 20


Nursing Conceptual Model Develop Your Own Conceptual

Nursing Conceptual Model Develop your own conceptual model Nurse conceptual model: Nurse 'burnout' The most common reason nurses cite for entering the profession is their desire to help others. However, because nurses are often placed in the position of caretakers, they seldom have the ability to engage in positive self-care, especially under highly stressful situations when a patient's life is at risk, or when the organization for which they work is understaffed yet depends upon split-second, accurate reactions by the nurse. The result of these pressures is the phenomena of nurse burnout, a state of being which manifests itself in physical, emotional, and behavioral symptoms and, if left untreated and ignored, can result in the nurse leaving his or her current position and even the profession of nursing entirely (Burnout: Warning signs, 2009). Nurse burnout is a serious issue, given the increasingly critical shortages of nurses across the nation. To reduce the rate of burnout amongst nurses, it is important to define its core features, which contain physical, emotional, and behavioral manifestations. Physical symptoms Physical symptoms of burnout are manifestations of burnout that affect the physical body or person of the nurse. Nursing is a demanding profession, mentally, emotionally, and physically. Because of the lack of nurses at many facilities, "many nurses work 12-hour shifts and have more schedules during which they work on their feet all day, lifting, rolling, and moving equipment and patients" (Gelinas 2003). A nurse can never simply 'coast' through her day: unlike an office worker, he or she must be 'on' every second of a shift. The physical demands may manifest themselves in back pain, swollen feet, or other occupational injuries. Also, the mental and intellectual demands put upon the person of the nurse may result in physical symptoms, such as high blood pressure, nausea, a craving for high-carbohydrate food or an inability to eat, and other manifestations of a high-stress response. Additionally, like many shift workers, particularly those who do not see a great deal of daylight because of their eccentric hours, nurses may find it difficult to eat and sleep properly simply due to their schedule. This is how the nurse's 'environment' may predispose the nurse to an unhealthy physical state. A poor diet, addiction to caffeine or nicotine, and even prescription and non-prescription stimulants are ways that nurses may self-medicate to get through a difficult day, ironically sacrificing their own health while…

Pages: 4  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 3


Nursing Leader's Perceived Role in Nurse Recruitment

LR Explor/The nurse leader role in recruit. Nurse Leaders as Recruiters Nurse leaders serve an integral role in the field to demonstrate skill in recruitment of future nurses. To do this they must work within existing systems as well as advocate for the expansion of other recruitment essential systems and system change need awareness. Nurse leaders must work collaboratively with…

Pages: 30  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 25


Future of Nursing in Texas

Future of Nursing in Texas Like all other states in the U.S. Texas is on the brink of what many assume will be a disruptive nursing shortage (Texas Team, 2009). Nurses are the largest demographic portion of the health care delivery system, and they are in some way involved in the care of nearly every patient in need of care…

Pages: 8  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


Neo-Natal Nurse I Want to

In addition, because I am a black female, I feel that I could relate to black babies in areas where there are few black nurses, and I feel this would be a help to the families, as well. As of 2003, only 4.9% of nurses in the United States were African-American, and the number of neo-natal black nurses is even smaller. I feel I have much to give to the field, and could help create an environment that was more supportive for children and their families in the black community. As a high school student, I have been committed to my education, and my future. I hope to attend nursing school when I graduate, and specialize in neo-natal nursing. I have a BLANK (ADD HERE) GPA, and will graduate in the top numbers in my senior class. I feel I have much to offer to nursing school, and I hope you will accept my application to attend school beginning with the Spring Semester 2005. Thank you. References Author not Available. "Minority Nurse Statistics." MinorityNurse.org. 2003. 15 Oct. 2004. < http://www.minoritynurse.com/statistics.html Author not Available. "Neonatal Nurse." Nursesource.org. 2004. 15 Oct. 2004.……

Pages: 1  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Admission to Nursing Training Thank

I am invited to participate in nursing conferences in the community and I take part in staff development programs offered in our community. Under the nursing home guidelines I am obliged to have conversations with our patients but I do far more than engage in small talk. Since I see them 5 days a week is should come as no…

Pages: 4  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Family Nurse Practitioner Is a

This supervision can come in multiple forms. It is not unusual to see stand-alone clinics that are staffed by nurse practitioners with a supervising doctor who does not routinely appear at the clinic. In other instances, family nurse practitioners may work with doctors in family medical care centers, so that they literally work together on a daily basis. One of the more interesting, but also somewhat controversial, uses for family nurse practitioners is the role of the mobile nurse who visits rural areas and provides healthcare to people who would otherwise not have access to a primary healthcare professional. Those nurses may work almost completely independently of doctors, only utilizing them when a patient needs a referral for care. One thing that does seem to separate the family nurse practitioner from the family doctor is nursing's emphasis on a collaborative care model. "Family nurse practitioners approach patients with an understanding of the value of collaborative, family-centered care" (Britt, 2012). In other words, nurses focus on treating the family rather than just the patient. This can be especially useful when dealing with chronic diseases, such as diabetes, where lifestyle changes aimed at disease management should involve the entire family dynamic. Furthermore, that collaborative approach extends beyond the focus on the family and includes the entire potential of healthcare providers. "In addition to the focus on family dynamics, nurse practitioners have referral and consultative relationships with other healthcare providers, such as physicians, pharmacists, and psychologists. Effective collaboration has proven to promote better communication, healthcare management, and positive health outcomes" (Britt, 2012). In other words, family nurse practitioners know that in many cases their patients' healthcare needs will be outside of the scope of routine care and management, and then, instead of focusing on providing treatment, they focus on ensuring that their patients have access to the appropriate care. The role of the nurse practitioner is gaining traction, not only in the United States and Canada, but also around the world. In a recent survey examining the spread of the nurse practitioner, 71% of 31 countries indicated that they had some type of nurse practitioner program (usually through a master's degree program), with 23 countries formally recognizing nurse practitioners as something distinct from nurses (Pulcini et al., 2010). What this change may mean is that that the traditional family doctor as the primary initial healthcare provider may be undergoing a transition, and family…

Pages: 3  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Nursing Course Project Milestone #1:PICOT

Nursing and Allied Health Collection has 400 titles, and offers work of professionals working in the field and students in nursing-focused curriculum. This database offersnursing profession issues hence I find it useful. 2. How can you focus or expand the search if initial search results are not satisfactory? The research on the nursing communication issues can be carried on the journals mentioned above. If these journal articles are not found enough to cover the subject, two more things can be done. The internet research can be conducted to find what problem other nursing departments and organizations are facing and how did they solve them. Besides that, there can be a primary research conducted on the nurses to find what is hurdle in the confident communication and how do they feel they can overcome it. 3. Describe ways you might refine your general search to reduce the number of results from your search. Can you use the EBSCO subject headings? What about the advanced search option using Boolean limiters such as AND. Once you have a reasonable number of relevant search results (10-30) what final limiters will, you set to reduce the search results further (i.e., English language limiter, age limiters, publication year limiters, peer-reviewedjournallimiter, and/or human subject limiter)? The research can be refined using several procedures and sources. The EBSCO subject headings deal with maintaining Comprehensive Subject Index of subject terms that can be applied to all articles that are indexed through EBSCO. This offers a disciplined approach to research. The advanced search using Boolean limiters like AND help find what sources are must to come to a final solution. These sources should be qualitative AND quantitative etc. Normally publication year limiter and peer-reviewed limiter are used to refine research. Besides that, matching exact key words in the problem statement also play a vital role in selection of resources. Literature Review Worksheet Your Name: Date: July 15, 2013 Your Instructor's Name: Purpose: To find evidence to support an intervention that will change the outcomes. Search Question: APA Reference for Article Peer Reviewed Brief Description of Research Type of Research Study Outcomes / Recommendations 1 Anderson, L, (2012), "Why Communication in the Nursing Profession is Important?," Retrieved from: http://www.nursetogether.com/why-communication-in-the-nursing-profession-is-important No Discusses how lack of confidence in communication results into conveying or wrong message among patients, peers and doctors. Qualitative Facilitate nurses in their communications. 2 MacKay, R. C, Matsuno, K, and…

Pages: 4  |  Capstone Project  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 6


Nursing Definitions Autonomy in the

Nursing negligence claims have been increasing for several years and there is no sign of a slowdown on the horizon. Because of health insurance limitations more responsibilities are being delegated to assistants who do not have proper training and patients are being discharged earlier than before without proper referrals. There is also a nursing shortage in the country which contributes…

Pages: 10  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 10


Nurse as Patient Advocate Persons

Mary Brophy (2001) discusses the role of nurse advocacy in the neonatal unit. The doctors and nurses are acting in the best interest of the infant. However, they also must not forget the infant also has a family who also has an opinion as to what is best for the infant. This can get into a struggle as to who…

Pages: 4  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Ethical Analysis: Nursing Situation

D: Current law / regulation at use The Nurse Practice Act touches on this ethical situation where nurses have to promote patient's autonomy at all times. E: Ethical Theory plus Resolution In his approach to virtue ethics, Aristotle identified courage, truthfulness, and autonomy as some of the aspects defining one's professional character. In the quest to resolve this ethical dilemma, the nurse in question should desire to empower the patient buy providing all the required information relating to the ailment. This will foster autonomy because the patient will be able to make an informed decision without feeling short-changed. Medical and nursing education should include joint discussion sessions to addressing treatment and ethical issues (Peirce & Smith, 2013). The curricula should be designed to avail more information on the processes and principles considered in the provision of most complementary patient care contributions. F: The outcome is supported by the ANA Code The ANA Act considers the nurse as the essential element of resource management (Fry, Veatch & Taylor, 2010). The professionals give the patients relevant information regarding their condition, treatment, and ways of coping. G: How the proposed resolution promotes ethical justice New medical frameworks allow nurses to adopt more responsibilities in planning and identifying strategies to reduce or resolve illness-related problems (Butts & Rich, 2013). The success of such schemes requires freedom in the acquisition of information related to the patients' welfare. The concept fosters new ways of addressing problems and selecting health care priorities together with the patient and other stakeholders. References Butts, J., B. Rich, K., (2013). Nursing Ethics: Across the Curriculum and Into Practice. New York: Jones & Bartlett Publishers Fry, S., T. Veatch, R.M. Taylor, C., (2010) Case Studies in Nursing Ethics. New York: Jones & Bartlett Publishers Peirce, A.G., & Smith, J.A. (2013). Ethical and Legal Issues……

Pages: 5  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Promoting Advanced Nurse Practitioner and Common Errors Made

ANP Advanced Nursing Practice: Promotion and Accountability Promoting ANP to the Public: In its traditional sense, the nursing profession is often thought of as an assistant class to medical professionals such as doctors, surgeons and clinical specialists. In spite of the important functions performed by nurses, their job roles and prospects for advancement in practice have been historically stagnant. However, that is changing considerably today as the nursing professional's role is evolving in an array of compelling directions. Even as this occurs, the public seems largely to be retained in its limited view of the role of nursing in healthcare. However, in order for the public to reap the benefits of the expanding research and the resulting improved capacity of public and community agencies to serve demographics specifically in need, it is necessary for key populations to better understand the role of the ANP. The best route to accomplishing this is likely to be the use of outreach programs for targeted need populations. This concurs with the findings by McGee & Castledine (2003), who observe that reforms in the role of nursing have been "aimed at reducing health inequalities by improving both access to and the quality of healthcare by, for example, involving service users in service design and delivery and tailoring services to meet local needs." (p. 2) This means that an important function of ANP is to place nurses in community roles that can help them to employ these expanded professional abilities to the specific benefit of underserved demographics. Public health agencies and community clinics should be seen as the path for promotion of advanced nursing practice, with a greater presence of these qualified professionals improving the service capabilities of otherwise frequently understaffed and resource-poor health outlets. Avoiding Common ANP Mistakes: That said, even as the role of the nursing professional expands, so too does the relative liability of the healthcare worker. Accordingly, we find that myriad risks to one's professional and legal status may be incurred when one takes to this next level of……

Pages: 2  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Wide Neighborhoods a Story of the Frontier Nursing Service

¶ … Neighborhoods Breckenridge, Mary. (1981). Wide neighborhoods: A story of the frontier nursing service. Mary Breckenridge was born to a privileged family, and grew up amongst European aristocracy. Yet much like nursing founder Florence Nightingale, Breckenridge rejected a life of comfort for the rigors of medicine. As Florence Nightingale was drawn to serve soldiers during the Crimean War, Breckenridge felt compelled to bring healthcare services to rural communities in the American South. Wide neighborhoods: A story of the frontier nursing service is Breckenridge's 1954 autobiography and the story of her mission. It is compelling reading, partially because of the author's considerable accomplishments but also because it is rare to read firsthand soul-searching examinations, written by nurses in their own words. Breckenridge clearly had a kind of calling: she could recall nursing a sick baby when she was still a child herself (Breckenridge 1954, p. 16). This event would later be a harbinger of her field of specialty, that of pediatrics and midwifery. She also spent time amongst the Native American population, which solidified her passion to help the underprivileged (Breckenridge 1954, p. 43). However, according to Mary, she was not born with a desire to become a nurse. Not until her husband died an untimely death did she put aside her old dreams of becoming an explorer, and instead became interested in the career of nursing (Breckenridge 1954, p. 51). Because of her spotty education and her footloose childhood which lead her from Russia America, Breckenridge did not even have a high school education. It is a testimony to how far nursing has evolved as a scientific profession that a woman with little education in arithmetic could reach Breckenridge's level in the healthcare field! Even during her training, however, she was an advocate for the ailing and disabled children on the ward where she served, in an era where their needs were often ignored. After World War I, she worked to give aid to the people of France, particularly the children, who were often emotionally and physically shell-shocked because of what they had witnessed. This hardened her to living in difficult conditions. Even after she suffered a broken back, she was still determined to realize her goal of improving healthcare for the nation's poorest. Breckenridge founded the Frontier Nursing Service in Kentucky. Previously, poor, rural women giving birth often had no skilled assistance whatsoever. Breckenridge reached women on horseback,…

Pages: 3  |  Book Report  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


From RN to Nurse Practitioner

Nurse Practitioner R.N. From R.N. To Nurse Practitioner Summary of Research & Clinical Problem Analysis of Literature on Nursing Practice - Use of Self-Report Tools Nurse Practitioner vs. Registered Nurse Reasons for Transfer Gaps in Research Strengths & Weaknesses of the Concept Summary of Overall State of Knowledge of the Concept & Related Problem Discussions & Summary Conclusions This paper…

Pages: 10  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 10


Nurse Barriers Nursing Care and Barriers to

Nurse Barriers Nursing Care and Barriers to Evidence-Based Practice In a recent and rather typical nursing setting, I was tasked with delivering care -- including the provision of advice -- to a patient with Type II diabetes. The care provided was very standard and straightforward, as the patient was present in the medical office for a check-up/monitoring of her condition and not due to any new or recently aggravated symptoms or other complaints or concerns. Insulin and fasting glucose were tested and assessed in accordance with established guidelines, dietary records were taken as reported by the patient, and dietary choices were discussed in light of the patient's reported eating habits and history of insulin needs as well as other parameters of her condition. All of this was accomplished in keeping with evidence-based practice, as far as this nurse is aware, and yet this really is the crux of the issue (Polit & Beck, 2012). The degree of standardization and established practice guidelines for such check-ups is assumed by the nurse to be in keeping with research and thus to constitute evidence-based practice, and yet the regularity of the interpretation of results and of the advice given does not appear to be individually customizable nor has this nurse been able to independently verify the recommendations made for practice and care delivery. The primary barrier to delivering, or more correctly to confirming the delivery of, evidence-based care, is a lack of time available to the nurse to engage in reading the relevant research (Zeitz & McCutcheon, 2003). Especially in a general practice setting where no real specialization exists, nursing staff are not only expected but required (due to a variety of ethical, medical, personal, and legal constraints) to provide care along established guidelines and to make significant adjustments to care only after lengthy discussions with nursing leaders and/or physicians, and must be able to do so for a variety of patients in……

Pages: 2  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Registered Nursing

Registered Nursing Registered nurses are medical practitioners who offer and coordinate patient care in addition to advising and providing emotional support to patients and their families. These professionals work in diverse health care settings including home healthcare services, hospitals, nursing care centers, and physician's offices. Moreover, registered nurses work in schools, with the military, correctional facilities, and summer camps. Since these medical professionals work in different settings, they have three education paths i.e. diplomas from authorized nursing programs, an associate nursing degree, and a bachelor's in nursing. In addition to either of these education paths, registered nurses must be licensed through passing a national licensing exam. As part of their initiatives to provide and coordinate patient care, registered nurses carry out several duties including recording patients' symptoms and medical histories, giving medicines and treatments, and developing patients' care plans. They also observe patients, record their observations, consult with other healthcare practitioners, manage and supervise medical equipment, and help conduct diagnostic tests and evaluate results. With regards to advising patients' families, they teach patients and their families on management of diseases or injuries and explain necessary procedures after treatment ("Registered Nurses," 2012). In some cases, these professionals are mandated with the task of supervising licensed practical nurses, home care aides, and nursing aides. The duties and titles of registered nurses is usually dependent on their work settings and their patients since they can focus on several specialties like a specific health condition, a particular body part, a certain group of people, and a specific working environment. While some of them combine two or more of these specialties, there are several possibilities for specializing. In the current……

Pages: 2  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 1


Role of APN

Role of an advanced practice nurse (APN) has changed and evolved over the years to the point where an APN has more authority, more respect and more responsibility -- and this paper delves into those responsibilities. The paper also reviews the intelligent use of the APRN (or APN) and the not-so-intelligent use of these well-trained healthcare professionals. The prescriptive authority…

Pages: 10  |  Research Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 7


Adult Nurse Practitioner Marketing Portfolio

NPs bring in income on a fee-for-service basis or a per-member-per-month basis. Figuring an NP's share of income for a fee-for-service practice is done by multiplying the number of visits by the collected fee per visit. . . . Until NPs no longer need a physician on written agreement, all NPs should expect in pay something for physician consultation. Experienced NPs often pay physician employers/consultants 10 to 15% of their net income brought to the practice. Most employers will want a percentage of an NP'S earnings as profit. (Buppert, 2007, pp. 315-316). Buppert (2007) recommends that NPs who believe they deserve higher salaries than surveys indicate should present their rationale for requesting a higher figure during salary negotiations. The following three points prove worth not only considering but remembering and implementing the concepts: 1. A nurse practitioner who does not ask for a higher salary figure will not receive one. 2. A nurse practitioner who does not deserve a higher salary figure will not receive it. 3. Even when a nurse practitioner asks for and may actually deserve a higher salary figure; that NP will need to "sell" the rationale to receive a higher salary figure to secure it (Buppert, 2007). The NP will also need to negotiate benefits. The package may vary according to the following three measures: 1. What benefits best match the needs of the NP? 2. What benefits appear most reasonable? 3. What specific benefits are other NPs routinely receiving? (Buppert, 2007). Numbers 1 and 2, however, depict the only considerations that matter. The NP also needs to consider whether the employer pays for continuing education. Additional concerns that need to be addressed that affect the bottom line of the NP's revenue potential include: A retirement plan Job-related expenses like a cellular telephone, beeper, and travel Vacation Sick leave Malpractice insurance Relocation expenses Any sign-on bonus Professional dues Reference books and/or subscriptions to professional publications The following table relates a comparisonof salaries relating to nurse practitioners a 2010 survey indicates: TABLE Average Earnings by Job Title (adapted from IOM Institute of Medicine, 2011, p. 4-20). Position Average Earnings Staff Nurse $61,706 Management/Administration $78,356 Nurse Anesthetist $154,221 Clinical nurse specialist $72.856 Nurse Midwife $82,111 Nurse Practitioner $85,025 Patient Educator $59.421 Patient coordinator $62,978 Informatics nurse $75.242 Marketing Plan To market one's self as an adult NP, the NP could benefit from using a selection of promotional tools…

Pages: 7  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


Nursing Quality Improvement Activities Providing

New Nursing Standards and Guidelines The emergence of new nursing specialties -- like the certified nurse anesthetist -- have shown that in order to improve quality, standards and guidelines are crucial. Nurse anesthetists have been providing care in America for close to 150 years. According to the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists, nurse anesthetists are the oldest nurse specialty group in the U.S. There is a set of standards and guidelines that these CNAs must follow to get certified -- ones which ensure total quality of services. Nurse anesthetists, for example, initially complete a bachelor's degree in a science or nursing. They must then pass the examinations to become a registered nurse. Candidates are required to have a minimum of one year of full-time nursing experience in an acute care setting, i.e. A medical intensive care unit. Following this, applicants apply to a Council on Accreditation (COA) accredited program of nurse-anesthesia. The training is offered on a masters degree or doctor degree level and the program length spans from 24 to 36 months. The curricula of nurse-anesthesia programs are governed by the Council on Accreditation (COA) standards and provide students the scientific, clinical, and professional foundation upon which to build sound and safe, and high-quality practice. Clinical residencies provide supervised experiences for students during which time they are able to learn anesthesia techniques, apply theory, and knowledge to clinical situations. Students work with patients of all ages who require medical, surgical, obstetrical, and pediatric interventions. Many require study in methods of scientific inquiry and statistics, as well as active participation in student-generated and faculty-sponsored research. In my opinion, if rigorous training like this were required for all nursing specialities, there would be a huge improvement in overall quality of nursing care. I also believe that ongoing, continuing education programs, given at the hospital, the place of employment, are vital to improving the skills of nursing generalists. Clinical Audits A Clinical audit is a total quality management process that has been defined as "a process that seeks to improve patient care and outcomes through systematic review of care against explicit criteria and the implementation of change." The key element of clinical audit is that performance is reviewed to ensure that what should be done is being done, and if not it provides a general outline to enable improvements to be made, continually. Clinical audits have been formally incorporated in the healthcare…

Pages: 3  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Beyond the Critical Incident Itself,

Reflexivity, the final dimension, has many salient questions. These questions include how current experiences dovetail and mesh with prior experiences, how prior situations could/should have been handled better, what would be the consequences of alternatives for the patient/others/self, how one feels NOW about the experience, whether one can support one's self and others better as a result of the new…

Pages: 8  |  Essay  |  Style: Harvard  |  Sources: 13


Reality Shock and Nursing

In general, the ideas of utilitarianism and deontology may be used as a paradigm for the issue of reality shock for nurses. Deontology says that we cannot make the determination about actions only by looking at the result. To make this affective, the individual should find the motives that allow us to translate actions from simply the philosophical idea into reality. Utilitarianism is an outcome-based theory, focusing primarily on the results of an action. In this theory, an action is ethical if it produces the most good and the least harm for everyone affected by the action ("the greatest good for the greatest number."). Stated another way, an action is ethical if more of society benefits; the social benefits for society are the positives less the social costs. There are several important issues surrounding this theory. This view tends to place the onus of responsibility solely in terms of the result produced by any action. It looks only at the conclusion, not the means to get there. Second, the benefits and costs include any kind of good or harm, including things (such as the value of a human life) that may be difficult to value in precise noncontroversial ways. Third, the benefits and costs include those that happen now and those that will happen in the future; future benefits and costs must be discounted to present value. Fourth, to be considered ethical, it is not enough that the action does more good than harm; the action must do the most good and the least harm to be judged ethical (MacIntyre, 2006). Using deontology as a personal model though, it is not just the outcome of patient care and service to the profession that is paramount, but the manner and way of modeling the appropriate behaviors in order to help the greatest number. The means to the end has already been established -- X amount of dollars and time should, in theory, not only result in a career that provides personal satisfaction and actualization, but actually helps people. Overall, the utility of this is helping the greatest number of people in the least amount of time in the most effective way. However, when dealing with the reality shock of modern nursing, it is the manner in which the nurse transitions from student to actual clinician, caregiver and above all, patient-advocate. For me, understanding that it is the long-game, the notion of…

Pages: 3  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


Specific Stages of Education of Adults

Nurse Management Education In today's world, knowledge is a product. Successful individuals and companies obtain additional expertise that others require, so it pays to continually learn. As noted by Malcolm Knowles, learning must be an ongoing process that continues throughout one's life. This is especially true in the healthcare fields, such as nursing, where there is continually changing technology and…

Pages: 5  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 5


Nursing Contract for Nurse Practitioner

¶ … Agreement entered on * (date) between *, APN and * institution (afterwards referred to as 'the Parties') is as follows: APN is duly licensed as an advanced practice nurse under * (state's) Law and is duly recognized under the aforesaid law as capable of engaging in advanced practice nursing and she also holds a graduate degree that is approved by the Board of Nursing. Therefore APRN and * Physician each recognize the compatibility of each other and desire to enter into the Nurse Protocol agreement that is applicable with the * (state) law's and regulations. Now, therefore, the parties agree as follows General requirements Description of Parties to the Agreement (Names / contact info.) Description of the practice C, Physician warrants that he will provide the APRN's DEA number to the Board within thirty (30) days of its issuance. II Consultation A. Physician shall be available to APRN for immediate consultation by telephone or by other telecommunications. In the event physician is not available, another readily located and specified physician will take his place. III. Duties In rendering her services, APRN shall exercise the required amount of care as defined by her profession and requirements of her profession and evidence the degree of skill, care and diligence that is expected of advanced nurse practitioners under similar circumstances and to this specific patient population Physician delegates to APRN the authority to perform the delegated acts expected of her position 1. Any……

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System Analysis of T-System Because

According to Ms. Small, the server for the T-SYSTEM is located in Massachusetts. The go-live date was set for one month in advance while preparations such as training nurses, doctors and all others was performed in two hour sessions arranged by the director of nursing for the emergency room and the medical director for doctors. At the end of the…

Pages: 10  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Conflict Resolution the Objective of

Getting people involved helps to spark creative energy and build commitment for turning ideas into action! Be sure to discuss any additional resources or support that might be needed in order to follow through on each suggested solution. (4) Agree. At this point, the group will decide on a plan of action, including the ways in which they'll support those who must take action. You'll also want to agree on what follow-up actions are necessary, whether it's another meeting or a series of monthly reports to track progress. (5) Close. Summarize the plan for resolution and check that everyone is clear on what needs to be done! (American Sentinel University, 2011, p.1) The work of Heimer (2011) reports that research has stated conclusions that "styles of conflict resolution are strong predictors of the level of morale, burnout and job satisfaction of the nursing profession. The use of negative coping mechanisms, such as confrontation and avoidance styles, result in increased negative outcomes, increased burnout and occupational stress." (p.1) Heimer (2011) additionally reports that the process of conflict resolution "is an opportunity for growth and change in a work environment, with great potential for a positive outcome. On an individual level, conflict resolution is important for personal achievement. On an organizational level it is important for the bottom line and overall success." (p.1) Summary and Conclusion This study has examined conflict resolution in the workplace and specifically in regards to the nursing role. Communication has been found to be of primary importance in the attempt to resolve conflict that is inherent in the nursing care environment. Bibliography Hiemer, Antoine (2011) Conflict Resolution -- Tools for Nursing. RN Journal. Retrieved from: http://www.rnjournal.com/journal_of_nursing/conflict-resolution-tools-for-nursing.htm Johansen, ML (2012) Keeping the Peace: Conflict Management……

Pages: 6  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Computers Used by Nurses the

Electronic patient record It is UHN's standard Clinical Desktop which gives healthcare professionals with immediate access to integrated patient records available in real time. EPR can operate with more than one patient record at a time as well as access to other applications such as the Internet, Intranet, Virtual Library and GRASP. The EPR is the hub of the patient record. It is used for order entry of medications (TGH and TWH), labs, and radiology and displays results. The online admission assessment can be launched or reviewed in the EPR. Nursing internet The Corporate Nursing Internet gives precious information about University Health Network (UHN) to the world. The Nursing Internet site provides UHN and chance to profile nursing practice, education and research to the whole world. The Web Enabled Nursing Innovation Team is responsible for the creation, design and maintenance of the UHN Nursing Internet site. (UHN Nursing) Key characteristics required in nursing software Capabilities, portability, ease of learning, use, reliability and cost. Conclusion There are multiple soft wares available in the market, which can assist nurses in their profession, however apart from use of quick and efficient softwares, it is also needed that nurses should be highly educated with proper training and their hesitation against use of softwares can be removed. Moreover, the shortage of nurses can also be overcome by the use of computer softwares. Bibliography Cornell University. 2012. Retrieved from Medical calculators: http://www-users.med.cornell.edu/~spon/picu/calc/medcalc.htm Evidence-based medicine_BMJ Journals. Evidence_based Medicine for primary care and internal Medicine . 2012 Nursing Informatics for BSN Nursing students. (n.d.). Retrieved from Data Analysis Nursing Informatics: http://www.nursing-informatics.com/kwantlen/nrsg4120.html Online journal of nursing informatics. (n.d.). Online journal of nursing informatics . PDA CORTEX. Retrieved from Nurses and technology: 2010 http://www.pdacortex.com/nurses_technology.htm searching and navigation. (n.d.). Retrieved from Searching and navigation: http://www.micromedex.com/support/training/healthcare_starter/starterkit/02_training_nav/page25.htm UHN Nursing. (n.d.). Retrieved from UHN nursing_ Nursing informatics: http://www.uhn.ca/about_uhn/nursing/site/informatics/computer_applications/grasp.html Ulmann, C.C. (n.d.). Using Online Technology to Enhance Educational Mobility. Online Journal of Nursing Informatics . World health organization. (n.d.). Retrieved from WHO laboratory manual for the examination and processing of human semen: http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/infertility/9789241547789/en/ind…

Pages: 6  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 10


Moral Distress: An Emerging Problem for Nurses

¶ … Moral distress: an emerging problem for nurses in long-term care? By several authors talks about moral distress in nursing - what it is, what causes it, and how nurses should deal with it. There have been studies into moral distress in nurses who work in high-stress areas, like intensive care, but there have not been studies into nurses who work in long-term care, and that is what this study is doing. Moral distress happens when nurses know they should do something, but cannot because of limits or rules in the healthcare system, and this can be difficult to manage. The article says, "Jameton suggested that moral distress arises when 'one knows the right thing to do, but institutional constraints make it nearly impossible to pursue the right course of action'" (Pijl-Zieber, et al., p. 40). This is a hard place for a nurse to be, and this is why this is such an important issue to study. Moral distress can affect the mind, the body, and other relationships, according to the researchers, and it can lead to nurses leaving their jobs, or even choosing another career over nursing if it keep on long enough. If this happens, it can lead to more understaffing, more nurses leaving, and the problem never gets solved. This study shows that several things contribute to moral distress, like when a nurse cannot be a patient advocate, the nurse and doctor do not work together, and the nurses don't get support from management and administration. The study also looks at the effects of moral distress, like anger and shame, anxiety and even depression (Pijl-Zieber, et al., p. 44). It can lead to stress and stress-related symptoms like headaches and bad habits, and it can lead to guilt, and nurses may stop caring about their patients, which leads to poor care for the patients and unhappiness in job. The article gives some ways to deal with moral distress, like education, understanding the nursing code of ethics, learning to assess problems, and speaking out about problems and conditions. The authors also think that nurses should look for support from their peers, and……

Pages: 2  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 3


Interning at an Addiction Rehab

Within this context, data is being used within a qualitative capacity to help provide strength for larger underlying assertions about how the patient should have their drug treatment regiment outlined. Interviewing methods can help provide clear insight into drug patterns and behaviors of patients that will help care providers best provide for the scenarios of withdrawal and post care. Qualitative interviews can help care professionals adopt the best post care regiments and help patients transition back into the fold of regular life after undergoing drug treatment. Thus, data is being used within the capacity of influencing care strategies to provide the most effective care plan for individual patients with much different drug and addiction histories. According to Sullivan's approach to applied research, this is implementing many steps of applied research in that it is relying on critical thinking on the ground floor of care strategies. Critical thinking can help adjust care strategies without lengthy adjustments to care strategies that would require more formal methods of data observation and recording. This more informal type of data collection and on site analysis does show clear differences to how research shows up within a more formal academic context. More informal methods actually used in the field lack the lengthy time periods of data collection and analysis within a more structured setting. Rather than having to prove data measurements through statistical analysis, research in the field often relies on more qualitative data and the informal evaluations conducted by staff of all ranks, including nursing staff. This also has an impact on policy design, because it allows drug rehabilitation centers to provide more fluid care strategies that can be more easily adjusted to individual patient needs within a changing context, rather than have to wait for more traditional and formal methods of care strategies that rely on more quantitative methods for data collection and design.…

Pages: 2  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Domestic Violence and Low Birth Weight

Domestic Violence in Pregnancy and Low Birth-Weight Infants Implications for the Nurse in Care Delivery Domestic Violence and Low Birth Weight Babies The specific responsibility and one of the most vital factors is the critical assessment of the nurse, nurse practitioner and the treating physician of the pregnant women who is a victim of abuse. The pursuit of conducting a…

Pages: 20  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Perioperative Shaving

Perioperative shaving [Student name] [Instructor name] Date Perioperative shaving * Describe the process or procedure you have chosen and why you think it needs change. In a surgical procedure, it is better to remove the hair from site of surgery before the operation starts. This perioperative shaving is normally carried out a night before the surgery. The procedure is normally…

Pages: 6  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


Health Administration the Purpose of

There are many things that make up an education, and in the helping professions such as nursing, much of this information is a hands-on type of learning that cannot be obtained anywhere but on the job. Financing is another large concern, as many hospitals have cut back their staff in the face of rising costs. There are arguments that hospitals…

Pages: 59  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Sexual Harassment in Hospitals Existence

Negligent attitude from the supervisory officials or human resource department will definitely post a wrong sign and encourage opportunistic individuals to get on with their misbehavior with impunity. The onus lies with the human resource professionals to ensure that work ethics are not compromised in any way and that professional stature of the person or other individual reasons do not interfere in an impartial hearing of the reported abuses. The hospital management must encourage an open atmosphere where employees can apprise them of their concerns without any hesitation and promote an impartial discussion pertaining to any reported misbehavior. It certainly takes a combined effort on the part of the human resource professionals and the employees to create a congenial working climate and to prune up the weeds that in any way threaten to destroy the positive, hope giving, and curative hospital ambience. Bibliography 1) Anita Hoffman, Louis Hamlin, 'Perioperative Nurses and Sexual Harassment', Retrieved on February 16th 2004, from http://www.findarticles.com/cf_0/m0FSL/5_76/94538204/p1/article.jhtml?term= 2) Michele T. Pathe, "Patients who stalk doctors: their motives and management," Retrieved on February 16th 2004, from, http://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/176_07_010402/pat10750_fm.html 3) Phoebe Dey, "Nurses Face High Rate of Workplace Violence," Retrieved on February 17th 2004, from, http://www.expressnews.ualberta.ca/expressnews/articles/news.cfm?p_ID=4063& s=a 4) Gilbert A. Bouchard, " Nurses Place Violent Workplace: Study" Retrieved on February 17th, 2004, from http://www.expressnews.ualberta.ca/expressnews/articles/news.cfm?p_ID=651& s=a 5) Susan P. Phillips, and Margaret S. Schneider, "Sexual harassment of Female doctors by patients," The New England Journal Of Medicine, Volume 329:1936-1939, December 23, 1993, Retrieved on February 17th, 2004 from, http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/full/329/26/1936 6) Church of Scientology, "Psychiatrists and Sexual Abuse," Retrieved on February 17th 2004, from, http://www.scientology.org/reform/new/75psych.htm 7) Henry R. Fenton, "Physicians and Sexual Misconduct, retrieved on February 16th 2004, from, http://www.millerhealthlaw.com/publications/pdfs/physicians_misconduct.pdf.…

Pages: 7  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Evaluation of Home Care and Community Care in Canada

Home Care and Community Care in Canada The commitment towards reducing, eliminating and reducing inequities aims at extending the prevention timeline and modalities to victims of any disease. Health promotion promotes good health and sanitation to citizens. It also aims at providing and creating conducive environments that enable the society to be self-reliant in forming a robust community that can…

Pages: 15  |  Research Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 8

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