"Computers / IT / Internet" Essays

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Digital Divide Term Paper

Term Paper  |  2 pages (697 words)
Bibliography Sources: 2

SAMPLE TEXT:

Digital Divide

Many see the digital divide as a concept that is applicable not only on a global scale, but also on a national one. Rather than rich countries reaping all the rewards of the digital age, while those in poor countries continue to suffer because of a lack of resources, the rich and poor within a single country, and particularly in the United States, face the same paradigm.

Much has been said and written about the abject poverty of some citizens within Westernized societies. The United States is a particularly poignant example of this problem. The country, claiming to have opportunities for all, in reality has opportunities only for some, and particularly for the rich. Like other basic resources, such as food, water, and literacy, the concept of information literacy is becoming increasingly important in the world today. The rich, with access to computers and Internet software, have the power to become information literate and to make use of the many opportunities offered by the Internet. The poor, on the other hand, have no such resources and remain bewildered in a world where information is exchanged at increasing rates, with no opportunity for those left behind to catch up.

Another rather sad reality, as cited by DigitalDivid.org, is the fact that software engineers, like most business people, cater to those perceived as profitable for their business, and not particularly to those most in need of resources. Those who do cater for the lower income groups in the country do so with lower quality software, and therefore tend to widen rather than close the gap between the rich and the poor. The problem within the United States is therefore perpetuated by digital software countries who see the only function of their assets and solutions to be one of profit.

On a global scale, the problem is even more significant. Countries such as the United States, regardless of the ever widening divide within its borders, are generally perceived as rich. And indeed, these countries also act rich in the global arena. Continents such as Africa and other third-world countries,…… [read more]


Life Case Study

Case Study  |  13 pages (3,503 words)
Style: APA  |  Bibliography Sources: 3

SAMPLE TEXT:

Life Span Case Study Project: An Analysis of How Computers Have Affected the Lives of Three Different Age Groups

This life span case study project interviewed three individuals from the following age ranges, representing a mother, father and child in the same family who all live together:

Interviewee No. 1: "Mary," age range middle and late childhood (age 12 years);… [read more]


Software Development in Cloud Computing Research Proposal

Research Proposal  |  2 pages (581 words)
Bibliography Sources: 4

SAMPLE TEXT:

Cloud Computing

Reliability of Cloud-Based Software

As the pace of technology -- and specifically computer and Internet technologies -- continues to increase, it has become clear that "cloud computing" will mark the next major revolution in the way in which communication, information sharing, data manipulation, and all manner of other digitized processes will occur. There have been tremendous leaps forward in making cloud computing a full functional reality, and indeed many cloud platforms and programs are in regular use by millions worldwide. This does not mean that there are not certain problems yet to be surmounted by the planners, programmers, and engineers working on tomorrow's software solutions, however, and an acknowledgement of these issues is necessary in order to develop truly effective and successful solutions to such problems.

Reliability is one major concern for cloud computing software applications, as ensuring access to such applications as well as ensuring the integrity and ongoing functionality of cloud software meets with new and more intricate complexities than traditional software applications (Dikaikos et al. 2009; Mell & Grance 2009). Certain research has linked some of the reliability issues currently faced by cloud computing software applications with the lack of a clear and direct monetization model for cloud computing, noting that infrastructure and support services simply have not been provided in adequate amounts due to a perceived lack of profitability (Dikaikos et al. 2009). Other researchers have found that ambiguities and confusion in the theories underlying cloud computing also contribute to reliability issues by creating a muddled understanding of goals and objectives (Youseff et al. 2008).

There are several theoretical and practical solutions that have been developed and proffered as a means of addressing and countering these perceived (and real) reliability issues in the world…… [read more]


Information Flows and Financial Management Case Study

Case Study  |  2 pages (522 words)
Bibliography Sources: 2

SAMPLE TEXT:

Kuali Test Drive: A Look Into the Future

Information Flows And Financial Management

Kuali Test Drive:

A Look into the Future

The Kuali Financial System is an open sourced, internet-based financial system designed to function as well as current Financial Systems. In essence it is "in the cloud," a web application which can be used anywhere a computer has internet access. In this way it is unique, especially when compared to legacy Financial Systems, which are bound to company servers. The Kuali Model may come to embody the future of administrative systems.

Kuali has multiple "test drive scenarios" which allow prospective customers to use the software before purchasing. The first two are, in order, "Project Code" and "Transfer of Funds." The first focuses on starting up a project. It teaches the user how to start a project, name it, send an ad hoc request, and review the Route Log. In truth, this was a supremely easy task. Going through it took two minutes, and in no way stretched any capabilities.

The second task, on the other hand, provided a tad bit more challenge. This task teaches the user to create an eDoc, a Transfer of Funds, which will be used to route funds to other accounts ("Test drives of," 2010) ). The most interesting, and useful, thing about open sourced software is that it tends to work with other software. This is especially true for Kuali, as it uses Comma Separated Value files to import information directly into the eDoc. Comma Separated Value files are common files which are generally used…… [read more]


Secondary Research Business Information Systems Essay

Essay  |  4 pages (1,247 words)
Bibliography Sources: 6

SAMPLE TEXT:

The skills required to operate the systems included PC skills and basic networking. The focus at this stage was that of automating the existent processes.

During the 1990s decade, the WANs became increasing presences in corporations and the focus of management was that of integrating the data and the systems. Stand-alone systems gradually become obsolete. The skills required to operate these systems included network supports, integration of systems and the administration of the databases. The goal of the business information systems at this stage was that of creating central control and promoting corporate learning.

Finally, during the 2000s decade, the WANs expanded with the aid of the Internet and came to include global enterprises and business partners, including purveyors. The desires of managers relate to data sharing across systems and the main focus of the systems is that of increasing speed and efficiency in inventory, manufacturing and distribution operations. The skills required from the people operating the business information systems in the twenty-first century include network support and systems integration (University of Wisconsin).

Today, the IT community is characterized by the advancement of the mobile technologies and the speed of evolution is so rapid that it is believed that some day in the not so far future, everyone will have a tablet (Hon, 2011). These developments have impacted not only the personal leisure time, but also the business information systems.

The specific field of mobile technology applied to business information systems is quite restricted for now, especially when compared to a multi-purpose application of mobile devices. Nonetheless, developments are also being made at this level. Hana Mohelska for instance pin points some of the most business usable mobile devices as follows:

Mobile telephones, as the largest category of mobile devices used in the business context

Netbooks, as the second most popular category of mobile devices used by economic agents

Personal digital assistants represent the third largest category of mobile devices used by business agents, with the specification that they be equipped with GSM capability

Other types of mobile devices used in business operations include the notebooks with a 4G card, pagers, BlackBerries, iPhones and GPS with GSM capabilities.

All in all, the technology is advancing at an unprecedented rate and this impacts all aspects of life, including the professional tasks. Within the context of economic agents, the advancements are materialized in more capable business information systems, which create efficiency and support the managerial teams in attaining their greater objectives.

The specific field of business information systems has undergone numerous processes of change and evolution. It has evolved from an isolated and difficult concept into one which integrates all aspects of business operations. And the field has not stopped from changing and a major component of its future evolutions is represented by the mobile technology.

References:

Curtis, G., Cobham, D., 2008, Business information systems: analysis, design and practice, 6th edition, Pearson Education, ISBN 0273713825

Hon, A., 2011, New technology: one day, everyone will have a magic tablet, The Telegraph, http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/technology-topics/8799481/New-technology-One-day-everyone-will-have-a-magic-tablet.html last… [read more]


Effects of Technology on Personal Relationships Dissertation

Dissertation  |  50 pages (13,203 words)
Bibliography Sources: 22

SAMPLE TEXT:

¶ … Technology on Personal Relationships

The rate at which information is shared in today's world is very different than just a few years ago. More and more, individuals, particularly college students are living both in the "real" world and in the virtual world provided by the internet, Facebook and other social media sites. There is a concern, raised by… [read more]


Defeating the Threat of Malware Term Paper

Term Paper  |  7 pages (2,198 words)
Bibliography Sources: 10

SAMPLE TEXT:

38). The manner in which botnets can be used by hackers appears to be limited only by their imaginations. In some cases, botnets can be used to generate revenues that involves only a few cents per transaction, but multiplied times tens of thousands or even millions, hackers and crackers can make large sums of money. In this regard, Perrow reports that, "Companies that place ads on, say, Google's search site, pay Google a few cents every time a computer clicks on that ad, and Google gives some of that money to the Web site that carries the ad. Through the botnet the hacker, with a Web site, can get many computers to click on the ad and will get a percentage of the fee the advertising company gets from Google" (p. 252). In other cases, botnets can be used to flood a particular Web site with queries to cause a denial of service attack that will completely disabled the site (Perrow, 2007). Taken together, of the two sources of infection, external and online attacks, the latter appears to represent the most formidable in terms of developing anti-malware protections, and these issues are discussed further below.

Future Trends

According to Gale (2006), "Just as real viruses mutate to evade antiviral medication, the writers of computer viruses and other forms of malware change their code to elude our antivirus software" (p. 19). Even as anti-malware developers build their walls higher and their moats deeper, it is clear that malware developers are standing by, ready, willing and able to defeat these improved defenses. Indeed, Gale suggests that it is reasonable to suggest that these trends will become even more pronounced in the future as malware developers improve their networks of communication and share industry-wide proprietary secrets in ways that will be increasingly difficult to counter. With respect to future trends, Gale concludes that, "The good news is that rootkits are difficult to write; the bad news is that they can be easily downloaded from the internet. Expect to see more of them being used to attack your computer" (p. 19). Alas, there is plenty more bad news as well with respect to future trends in malware development, with current signs indicating that attacks in the future will be directed at national security resources and major commercial enterprises (Hua, 2011). As one industry observer concludes, "Unfortunately, in their continuing game of cat-and-mouse, the hackers are outrunning the antivirus code vendors. But a solution will come; it's just a question of when. Until then, the only prescription is a regular dose of the same old: Make sure your virus protection software is current. And stay tuned" (Gale, 2006, p. 20).

Conclusion

The research showed that malware stands for "malicious software" and is an umbrella that includes adware, viruses, worms, Trojans and cookies. These applications can be introduced into a computer system through external means such as flash drives or DVDs, but the far more common approach is through various online connections. The research also showed… [read more]


Printer Plug-In: How Parallel Ports Term Paper

Term Paper  |  3 pages (807 words)
Bibliography Sources: 0

SAMPLE TEXT:

If there is not a charge on a pin that is signaled with a volt of zero. This is an efficient method of transmission of information that is digital across an analog cable effected in real-time.

Pin Ten: This pin has the responsibility of sending the signal that acknowledges that the printer has received the transmission from the computer. It operates as does Pin One in that the charge is maintained and voltage drop to that below 0.5 volts in signaling the computer that receipt of the data has taken place.

Pin Eleven: This pin receives a charge only if the printer is busy thus charging pin eleven and maintains this charge until the voltage goes below the 0.5 voltage level in signaling the computer acknowledging receipt of the data.

Pin Twelve: Pin Twelve is only signaled at the point in time that the paper has been depleted in the printer.

Pin Thirteen: Pin Thirteen services the purpose of signaling the computer that the printer is online

Pin Fourteen: This is the 'auto feed' signal sent to the computer by the printer and utilizing a voltage charge of 5.

Pin Fifteen: Voltage drop to under 0.5 on this pin signals to the computer that an error exists at the printer.

Pin Sixteen: This pin is only utilized if the computer through remote removes the printer from online status to that of offline status.

Pin Eighteen through Twenty-Five: These pins are used as grounding for the connection and are all under 0-5 volt charges.

The following page contains a chart showing each pin and its' respective function on both the DB25 connector and the Centronics. Pins 'One" through Pin "Twenty-Five' are all designed to match functions on each. The following chart is Chart 1.0 for the purpose of this work.

Centronics 36

PIN

SIGNAL

PIN

SIGNAL

1

Strobe

1

Strobe

2

data0

2

data0

3

data1

3

data1

4

data2

4

data2

5

data3

5

data3

6

data4

6

data4

7

data5

7

data5

8

data6

8

data6

9

data7

9

data7

10

acknowledge

10

acknowledge

11

busy

11

busy

12

paper end

12

paper end

13

select

13

select

14

auto feed

14

auto feed

15

error

15

error

16

Init

16

Init

17

Select In

17

Select In

18

gnd

18

gnd

19

gnd

19

gnd

2

gnd

2

gnd

21

gnd

21

gnd

22

gnd

22…… [read more]


Contracts Law Term Paper

Term Paper  |  3 pages (1,043 words)
Bibliography Sources: 0

SAMPLE TEXT:

Therefore, it was necessary for the contract to be in writing.

It is unclear whether or not all of the terms of the agreement were contained in the writing. Although the facts state that the parties agreed on the delivery date for the computer, it is unclear whether or not the date of delivery was contained in the writing.

There was a breach of contract. A breach of contract occurs when one party fails to fulfill its contractual obligations to the other party. Galaxy breached its obligation to deliver a Pentium 4 to Gabrielle on the specified date. Gabrielle may or may not have breached her obligation to deliver her trade-in and a $1,000 down payment on that date, depending on the terms of the parties' agreement. From the factual situation, it is unclear whether Gabrielle's obligations to Galaxy were conditioned on Galaxy's delivery of the Pentium 4. A breach is material if a party's failure to complete a condition of the contract affects the matter, as distinguished from the form, of the contract. Galaxy's breach was a material breach because the purchase of a Pentium 4 by Gabrielle was the entire subject of the contract. If Gabrielle committed a breach of contract, her breach may also have been considered material because the terms of the purchase involved her tender of a trade-in and $1,000 to Galaxy. However, if Gabrielle was ready, willing, and able to complete her obligations under the contract on the delivery date, and her failure to do so was because Galaxy failed to deliver the Pentium 4, she would not have been found in breach.

A court of law would enforce the parties' contract. The agreement complied with the terms of both the UCC and the Statute of Frauds. Furthermore, even if the delivery date was an additional oral term to the contract, nothing in the UCC or the Statute of Frauds prevents oral modifications or additional terms unless the contract specifically stated that it embodied all terms of the parties' agreement. Even if the contract contained such limiting language, the UCC imposes open the parties a duty of good faith, which would have required Galaxy to tender a Pentium 4 within a reasonable time.

The fact situation is not clear as to whether Gabrielle suffered any actual damages. The guiding principle in determining contract damages is to put the injured party in the position it would have been in if the contract had been performed. If the prices of Pentium 4s were generally greater than the value of her trade-in, $1,000, and two years of $40 payments, then Gabrielle could be entitled to the price difference. Furthermore, the court could order specific performance by requiring Galaxy to tender the Pentium 4 to Gabrielle in exchange for her completion of the conditions of the contract. However, specific performance is an unusual remedy. If Gabrielle could be made whole by purchasing a computer from another vendor, it is unlikely that the court would order specific performance. However,… [read more]


Apple Computers Term Paper

Term Paper  |  2 pages (570 words)
Bibliography Sources: 0

SAMPLE TEXT:

Apple Computers

In looking at many of the key ratios for Apple Computers, it appears that the company is slowly improving from problems that they had dealt with in the past. For example, Morningstar.com shows Apple's return on equity as being 5.94% in 2004, while it was only 1.66% in 2003. In addition to this, Apple had a strong negative return on equity in 1996 and 1997, so the company is generally improving. It has not been an easy road, however, since the return on equity in 1998, 1999, and 2000 was around 20%. Looking at these figures indicates that Apple did very poorly for a time, then did very well, and then began to do poorly again - although not as poorly as in the past - before finally beginning to pull itself up from the slump that it was dealing with. The return on equity is not as high as it was during the prosperous years of the late 1990s, but the slower gains indicate a more stable company and possibly a more stable environment as well, which is very good for Apple to continue into the future.

There are many other ratios that can be considered, but the return on equity ratio appears to be the most significant, especially when compared with that of one of Apple's top competitors - Dell Computer Corporation. The same ratios for that company show that Dell Computer Corporation has had a steady climb, and that none of the years listed indicate that Dell has ever had difficulty with a negative return on equity. In 2004, Dell Computer Corporation's return on equity ratio was 47.62%. In 1996 and 1997, years during which Apple struggled, Dell's return on…… [read more]


Security Issues of Online Communities Term Paper

Term Paper  |  60 pages (15,576 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

SAMPLE TEXT:

Security Issues of Online Communities

Online communities have emerged in recent years as a result of the rapid growth of the Internet, arousing intrigue in citizens, policy-makers and government officials. An online community is a group of people who interact in a virtual environment. They have a purpose, are supported by technology, and are guided by norms and policies. The… [read more]


Global E-Commerce Challenges Due to the Internet's Footprint and Availability to the Average Household Term Paper

Term Paper  |  10 pages (3,126 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

SAMPLE TEXT:

Global E-Commerce Challenges Due to Internet Availability

In the Average Household

There can be no question that technological advance in countries around the world has dramatically influenced global marketing concepts for many companies. As smaller developing nations begin to access the World Wide Web and as household penetration of the Internet increases across the world, nearly all companies are able… [read more]


Emerging Technologies Term Paper

Term Paper  |  9 pages (2,370 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

SAMPLE TEXT:

Technology

Emerging Technologies

The shift in the teaching and learning model is steadily evolving as technology evolves (Reid, 2003). Students are becoming more and more responsible for discovery and self-learning while teachers are assuming more of a facilitator role. Occupying a seat in a physical classroom is no longer necessary. With online access and a computer, students have unprecedented opportunities… [read more]


Jack the Ripper Case Study

Case Study  |  3 pages (1,055 words)
Bibliography Sources: 3

SAMPLE TEXT:

If the Ripper had been a prior offender and his sample was found on any of the bodies, it would have been pretty basic to figure out who he is, find him and capture/convict him. Granted, the ability to track down and capture people was a much taller order in the 1880's, but it probably would have happened (ExploreForensics, 2013).

3. In your opinion, if the Ripper were active today, would modern death investigation techniques, modern forensics, and medicolegal advancements of recent years have resulted in his arrest and conviction?

Yes…and from DNA alone not to mention profiling and verifying whether a death is a signature Ripper killing or if it's a knockoff or simply unrelated. Another reason the Ripper would have been caught is that if the communications to the media and authorities were truly him, it would probably be quite simple to track him down using internet and data technologies that would tell investigators the type of printer/computer that the communication came from and that assumes the computer itself that was used was not traceable and this would include internet cafes and such because many of those locations have login and surveillance information in case illegal activity is engaged in from a public computer (Palm, 2011).

A sterling example of a serial killer/rapist getting himself caught because he couldn't keep his mouth shut was Dennis Rader, aka BTK. After being dormant for years (which is exceedingly rare except when the killer/rapist is caught or dies), Rader was caught in large part because he started spouting the public and the media. That would not have happened, in all likelihood, in the time of the Ripper. Sure, there is a lot of skepticism as to whether some deaths and killer communications were actually the Ripper but that was due to the technological and procedural limitations of the time. If the Ripper was pulling his stunts now, he almost certainly would have been caught and the number of dead collected before that occurred would almost certainly have been a lot less. The immense power of the police to track down killers like that is maligned by the ACLU and others all of the time and the recent bad behavior of the NSA in the United States is no help, but it's invaluable when a mass killer is on the loose (ACLU, 2013).

References

ACLU. (2013, July 7). American Civil Liberties Union. ACLU On The Hill: NSA Surveillance. Retrieved August 30, 2013, from https://www.aclu.org/blog/national-security/aclu-hill-nsa-surveillance-intrusive-and-unconstitutional

Explore Forensics. (2013, August 30). Rigor Mortis and Lividity. Forensic Science, Crime Scene Investigations and Pathology. Retrieved August 30, 2013, from http://www.exploreforensics.co.uk/rigor-mortis-and-lividity.html

Palm, A.M. (2011, April 20). Video released from fatal shootout at Internet cafe's- Orlando Sentinel. Featured Articles From The Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved August 30, 2013, from http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/2011-04-20/news/os-apopka-robber-shot-dead-20110419_1_fatal-shootout-surveillance-video-internet-time

Slifer, S. (2013, August 30). Jack the Ripper Case: 125 years later, murders of London prostitutes by notorious serial killer remain unsolved - Crimesider - CBS News. Breaking News Headlines: Business, Entertainment & World News - CBS News. Retrieved… [read more]


Cyber Crime Essay

Essay  |  2 pages (690 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

SAMPLE TEXT:

The cyber criminal builds up an inventory of "…thousands of bot-infected computers" and from those computers he or she "resends spam" which makes the messages appear to be coming from legitimate source. When the computer user hits on one of those links, the bot can allow the criminal to "…extort protection money from businesses" (Latamore, p. 12).

A common scenario that could and does occur. For example, a criminal hacks into a computer in a business; from there, the criminal can "download malware to any computer" within the business's network (Latamore, p. 12). The criminal then steals the keys "…to the most valuable information" in the business. Solution? Companies need to continually upgrading their anti-virus, anti-malware software. Another scenario: criminals put up fake internet banner ads that look exactly like real banner ads; business employees click on the fake ad and "…they end up at a malware site," Latamore explains (p. 12). Even if the business has anti-malware protection "…traditional anti-virus software is always behind the malware" (Latamore, p. 13). The solution to the second scenario? Prevent employees from clicking on ANY banner ad on company computers.

Possible solutions to prevent intrusions into company servers and computers: Latamore says that encryption of data is expensive (because to use the data it must be de-encrypted, which is time-consuming and expensive) but it is worthwhile, Latamore explains. Legitimate users can see the encrypted data, but criminals cannot see it. Some companies are going beyond encryption, Latamore continues. They are using "…new storage technologies to break up data files across several separate storage devices," and with important company files "broken up, even if the bad guys access a few hard drives in an organization, they only get random parts of an encrypted file" (Latamore, p. 14).

Works Cited

FBI. (2012). Internet Crime 2012 / IC3 Releases Annual Report. Retrieved June 28, 2013, from http://www.fbi.gov.

Latamore, Bert. (2010). Cyber Threat Growing More Focused and More Sophisticated. Seybold Report: Analyzing Publishing Technologies, 19(1), 11-14.

Nykodym, N., Kahle-Piasecki, L., and Marsillac,…… [read more]


Planning, Assessment and Measurement Essay

Essay  |  10 pages (2,939 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

SAMPLE TEXT:

Fiber Network interface cards are available in single mode and multimode configurations that are 10/100 or 1000 Base-X transmissions speeds.

Hubs

Hubs are common devices that interconnects group of users. Hubs are responsible for forwarding data packets that includes word processing documents, e-mails, spreadsheets, print requests, and graphics to other ports through workstation. The computers connected to a single or… [read more]


Communications New Media CARE2 Discussion and Results Chapter

Discussion and Results Chapter  |  4 pages (1,439 words)
Bibliography Sources: 4

SAMPLE TEXT:

Evolving Media

Our generation is somewhat unique in regards to fact that we have had the opportunity to experience the rapid evolution of media channels first hand. For example, most of us are still old enough to remember having pen pals from different locations in which letters were mailed back and forth through conventional postal services. Depending on the distance,… [read more]


Google Apps, Should a Company Research Paper

Research Paper  |  11 pages (3,342 words)
Bibliography Sources: 6

SAMPLE TEXT:

And while there may be some initial costs involved in retraining staff to use the Google Apps system, Google provides interactive training in the use of their system.

Another reason to use Google Apps for Business is their ability to store data at a centralized location. This is a very useful application as it means that documents created using Google… [read more]


New Regulatory Framework for Telecommunications Discussion and Results Chapter

Discussion and Results Chapter  |  18 pages (5,019 words)
Style: Harvard  |  Bibliography Sources: 0

SAMPLE TEXT:

22

0.18

0.12

Evidence

15

0.21

0.29

0.12

0.75

0.22

0.02

0.08

0.14

16

0.31

0.33

0.35

0.71

0.14

0.06

0.16

0.22

Economic Growth

17

0.12

0.08

0.32

0.09

0.70

0.08

0.08

0.04

18

0.15

0.12

0.21

0.11

0.76

0.12

0.05

0.09

19

0.22

0.14

0.14

0.06

0.76

0.14

0.14

0.11

20

0.32

0.22

0.19

0.15

0.78

0.22

0.16

0.06… [read more]


Information System Central Processing Unit Term Paper

Term Paper  |  1 pages (338 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

SAMPLE TEXT:

The function of all these disk storage devices is to store data.

Upgrading an Older Computer

While upgrading an older computer, upgrading the hard disk will increase the storage capacity but will not increase the speed of a computer. Upgrading the RAM will add to the speed of the computer provided the processor is not too old. Upgrading the processor only will not make the computer faster if it has insufficient RAM. Generally speaking upgrading of RAM only (or the RAM and the processor) is a better option than upgrading the hard drive, since information can also be stored in external storage devices such as floppy disks and CD-ROMs. However, the cost of a new processor may be prohibitive if funds are limited.

Bibliography

Computer." Chapter on 'How Computers Work.' Article in Encyclopedia Encarta, 2003. CD-ROM version.

Information…… [read more]


History of Laptop Computers Term Paper

Term Paper  |  5 pages (1,501 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

SAMPLE TEXT:

Since the emergence of laptop computer, computing has been made better. Laptop computers provide services that characterize the advantage of portability. In the continuous development of different technologies, determining the future effects of laptop computers to humans is a subject of many possibilities. This can be proven by how laptop computers affect the many tasks of humans then and now. All we can forsee is that the technology of laptop computer will continuously evolve as it did yesterday and today.

Bibliography

2004. History of Laptop Computers.

Retrieved on June 09, 2004, from About.Com.

Web site: http://inventors.about.com/library/inventors/bllaptop.htm

Freudenrich, C. (2002). How Laptop Works.

Retrieved on June 10, 2004, from Laptop Worldwide.

Web site: http://www.laptopworldwide.com/ri/howlaptopswork/fact.htm

Gasch, S. Alan Kay.

Retrieved on June 09, 2004, from CS.UMD.EDU

Web site: http://www.cs.umd.edu/hcil/muiseum/kay/kay_page.htm

Locker, H. (2003). The Future of Notebook Computing.

Retrieved on June 11, 2004, from Extreme Tech.

Web site: http://www.extremetech.com/article2/0,3973,890294,00.asp

Stevenson, K. (1999). Laptop Computers and Their Impact on Sixth-Grade Learning.

Retrieved on June 11, 2004, from The Michigan Virtual University.

Web site: http://ts.mivu.org/default.asp?show=article&id=39

History of the Laptop Computers.

Retrieved on June 09, 2004, from Cheap Laptops Notebooks.

Web site: http://www.cheap-laptops-notebooks.com/history-laptop.html… [read more]


Enterprise Wide Networking Term Paper

Term Paper  |  12 pages (3,269 words)
Bibliography Sources: 0

SAMPLE TEXT:

The author argues that there are several factors that will ensure good internet security for an enterprise. These factors are risk based, holistic, dynamic and pragmatic.

The risk based aproach ensure that security is based on the greatest risk. This means that the enterprise examines all the risk involved in doing business over the internet and directs resources to the… [read more]


Security Issues Creating a Site Using Trend Research Proposal

Research Proposal  |  17 pages (4,754 words)
Bibliography Sources: 15

SAMPLE TEXT:

security issues creating a site using trend technologies such as PHP and MySQL

My research proposal is about the security issues creating a site using trend technologies such as PHP and mySQL. My research will expand in what are the security threats using such technologies and what are the solutions that these technologies provide as well as what are their… [read more]


New Media Essay

Essay  |  5 pages (1,615 words)
Bibliography Sources: 6

SAMPLE TEXT:

New media technologies have driven technological innovation and economic change in the past couple of decades. There are, however, costs associated with adopting new media in the form of both capital and time. Some people and some regions are better equipped and have more economic and intrinsic incentive to adopt new media technologies that others. The result of this is… [read more]


Digital Divide Thesis

Thesis  |  3 pages (850 words)
Style: APA  |  Bibliography Sources: 1

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Digital Divide

In this knowledge-based global economy, the power of information is the key to success in any sphere of activity. Having equitable access to telecommunication technologies is crucial for countries that strive to improve their economic status and life standards. Access gap is a civil rights issue with information technology finding its way into every aspect of our living. From educational institutions to job markets computer skills have become indispensable and the lack of amenities for communities to access this vital technological domain undermines the foundations of our civil rights, which promises equitable access to knowledge resources. While the cities have more penetration, rural areas are the places where the digital divide is more prominent. Government and the NGO's should make computer and Internet technology more useful to rural communities by developing technological programs that are more related to their environment and creating sustainable digital opportunities.

A classic example of bridging the digital divide is the case of Lalashan, a remote mountain place in Taiwan with an indigenous population making a living out of selling peaches. Due to the abundance in production, price of peaches fell down drastically making it an unprofitable trade for many of the indigenous families that cultivated peaches in Lalashan. The government-supported project in Lalashan helped this remote community in establishing a DOWEB (Digital Opportunity Within E-business) that enabled them to sell peaches over the Internet. This promised the native villagers annual income of atleast NT$3,000,000. By this innovative method of creating demand for information technology, the government of Taiwan succeeded in making the local farmers interested in learning about the technology. In 2000, the average income for the families was NT$2,000,000 and most of the families were computer illiterate but by 2005 80% of the households had computers with broadband connectivity and 91 families sold their peaches online and doubled their income compared to 2000. This is just one example where opportunity driven technological intervention proved to be an ideal solution for bridging the digital divide. [Liu et.al (2006)]

One of the high priority initiatives is to develop evaluation agendas to ascertain quality of access. This aspect is grossly ignored in most of the governmental and non-governmental initiatives to tackle the digital divide. Such a feedback system would highlight the needs, and the gaps in the current system and provide positive information for the development of appropriate content that would address the real needs of the specific communities. Catering to the diverse population in a community by including multi-lingual support and content specific to different cultural groups are important…… [read more]


Ten Flatteners Research Paper

Research Paper  |  5 pages (1,388 words)
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¶ … Flatteners' in the World is Flat by Thomas Friedman

In his latest, seminal work The World is Flat (2006), author Thomas Friedman provided a "brief history of the 21st century," detailing how, as human society approached this century, technological advancements defined the changes that occurred in societies and cultures all over the world. Friedman brought history not only from Americans' worldview, but more importantly, it also delved deeper into the implications that these technological advancements brought to societies outside of the United States. Ultimately, the author argued that computer-mediated technologies and the Internet changed the way societies all over the world interacted with one another, "flattening" socio-economic (and even political) structures through these new media technologies.

Friedman set the foundation of his discussion of the enormous benefits computer and Internet technologies by introducing the 'ten flatteners' specifically called, "The Ten Forces That Flattened the World." These forces, or flatteners, determined the course of history of the 21st century, and Friedman aptly discussed each flattener in the order of their relevance and/or inception as a new media technology or system. Discussion of the history and relevance of each flattener enlightened the reader on the roots of new media technologies, and how they have evolved from being simple hardware or software to critically influencing the lifestyles of people and the way business is conducted in specific countries, even between countries. Integrating these flatteners is more than just putting together bits of histories critically important to this century; this integration also brings together a complex system of computer and Internet technologies with the aim of discovering yet another innovate way wherein the world can be further flattened and societies can be brought closer to one another.

The ten flatteners were enumerated as follows: (1) 11/9/89-The New Age of Creativity: When the Walls Came Down and the Windows Went Up, (2) 8/9/95- The New Age of Connectivity: When the Net Went Around and Netscape Went Public, (3) Work Flow Software, (4) Uploading, (5) Outsourcing/Y2K, (6) Offshoring, (7) Supply Chaining, (8) Insourcing, (9) In-forming, and (10) The Steroids- Digital, Mobile, Personal, and Virtual.

It would indeed be informative if this book review will discuss each flattener Friedman enumerated. However, it is worthy to note that each flattener addresses one or more human need, and this book review discusses the flatteners based on their relevance and responsiveness to the following human needs: the need to connect, the need for knowledge, the need to become efficient, and the need to want and get what we want as users of these new media technologies. There may be other "needs" that any of the flatteners could address or respond to, but this review will focus on these four (4) needs, as they are recurring themes discussed in the book. Ultimately, these needs became the motivators and catalysts to the development of new technologies, structures, and systems (social, economic, and political) of countries/societies in the 21st century.

The human need to connect with others is the most innate:… [read more]


Strategies for Information System Thesis

Thesis  |  4 pages (1,398 words)
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¶ … Information System Recovery

In the Age of Information, organizations of all types and sizes are increasingly relying on sophisticated information technology system to support and drive their enterprises. Although Moore's Law continues to hold true and computer processing speeds continue to double approximately every 18 months, Murphy's Law is also a factor to consider because these information systems can and will fail for a wide variety of reasons, including manmade and natural disasters. In order to respond in a timely fashion to such information technology disasters, organizations must have a viable information system recovery plan in place before such events take place. To this end, this paper provides a step-by-step plan for organizations for creating strategies for restoration of information system operations in the event of an attack or failure and for the recovery of data that may be stolen, altered, or destroyed. An analysis of the respective strengths and weaknesses of current approaches and technologies that are designed to protect information systems and data is followed by a summary of the research and important findings in the conclusion.

Review and Analysis

Information systems can fail for a number of reasons, including the vagaries of the weather. In this regard, Reagan (2006) emphasizes that the incidence of weather-related information system failures has increased in recent years. "In the past year," Reagan advises, "the U.S. has experienced some of the most devastating storms in our history, resulting in catastrophic telecommunications failures. These disasters have highlighted the importance of enterprises planning for recovery in the event of network outages" (p. 60). Likewise, the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 made it abundantly clear that companies of all sizes and types are vulnerable to unexpected manmade disasters as well and it is apparent that when it comes to information systems, "prior planning prevents poor performance." For instance, according to Cohen (2004), "Businesses are not ultimately interested in backups per se; they are more concerned with having their mission critical data available or easily retrievable when disaster strikes. Do not look at data protection from the backup perspective; turn the idea on its head and think about planning for data recovery" (p. 3).

The first step in developing a viable information system recovery plan is to take stock of existing information systems and determine the major applications and system that host the organization's mission-critical documents and data files (Cohen, 2004). Such documents and data files will include, of course, financial records and accounting information, but should also include correspondence and email exchanges that have an impact on the organization's performance. Some of these documents and data files will inevitably be in different storage formats that may require different types of data backup approaches. The strength associated with this step is relates to the ability of an organization to take a "snapshot" of what information is relies upon at a given point in time in order to better respond to the unexpected; however, a clear weakness involved in this step is the need… [read more]


Society & Technology How Technology Stratifies Essay

Essay  |  3 pages (909 words)
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Society & Technology

How Technology Stratifies Society

The modern era if often lauded as the Information Age and the Computer Age, two defining characteristics of the world we live in today. It is difficult to imagine living in a world without computers -- they are in our cars, they operate our streetlights, control the complex flow of power through an electrical grid, and myriad other things that have a minute-by-minute effect on our lives. The availability of information -- and misinformation -- is arguably even more powerful than the simple presence and use of computers. The Internet has opened communication and distribution to whole new level; it is now possible to transmit a piece of information, be it text, and audio file, or even video, almost anywhere else in the world at nearly instant speeds. Like previous technological advancements of the twentieth century -- the telephone, the automobile, the airplane -- the technology found in computers and the Internet has served to make the world effectively smaller, creating quicker and more efficient bonds between people and nations across geographic and cultural barriers and distances.

The picture is not quite so simply rosy, however. Technology certainly helps those that have access to the technology, but it doesn't do anything for those that do not. This seems obvious, of course, but the implications of this statement are far more complex than they seem on the surface, for two primary reasons. First are the actual effects of the rising levels of technology and the availability of information in the world. Though generally beneficial, there are some unforeseen consequences of the world's new interconnectedness. These problems are exacerbated by the second major complicating feature, that of exactly who has access to the new technologies and who does not. In equality is greatly increased by the rise in high technology in both simple, obvious ways and through more subtle and complex interactions.

The most important factor regarding the utilization of computers and the Internet are the direct effects these have on the people who have access to them. The pace and breadth possible in business has changed dramatically due to the technological advancements made in the past few decades. People with access to technology are generally all moving at this increased pace, and have developed skills in combination with their use of computers. As their skills and the technology increase in tandem together, those with access to technology not only ride the wave of technology but push it ever higher. New opportunities open up as technology advances further, and these in turn require new skills to be learned. None of this is a problem for those who regularly use these new technologies; these things evolve over time.

But while…… [read more]


Executive Information Systems and Digital Dashboards Essay

Essay  |  3 pages (1,122 words)
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Executive Information Systems and Digital Dashboards: What They Are, How They Work, And How They Can Add Value

Today, computer applications are available that can help companies of all types and sizes improve their performance and profitability. Therefore, identifying appropriate technologies for a given company represents a timely and valuable enterprise. To this end, this paper provides detailed descriptions concerning what executive information systems and digital dashboards are, how they work, and how they provide value to today's business organizations by providing two examples of each. A summary of the research and important findings concerning these executive management tools is provided in the conclusion.

Review and Discussion

Executive Information Systems.

Definition. According to Thierauf and Hoctor (2003), executive information systems (hereinafter alternatively "EIS") can be defined as "systems for business that can turn selected information, knowledge, and intelligence into optimized solutions for decision makers to solve problems and explore new opportunities" (p. 17).

How Executive Information Systems and Digital Dashboards Work. Executive information systems work by providing a "snapshot" analysis of business processes and functions at a given point in time (Desouza). Like the digital dashboards which are a subset of EISs and which are discussed further below, executive information typically provide "dashboard" displays of data for executives who need to review various metrics of their company's performance (Desouza). According to Abel (2008), "Digital Dashboards provide users with one single interface through which they can view information from a variety of sources that have been chosen specifically for that user" (p. 4).

How Executive Information Systems and Digital Dashboards Can Add Value. In some cases, executive information systems will only have limited application because they are mostly static in nature (Desouza). Although EISs can provide executives with an overall picture, they have limited functionality for diagnostic purposes (Desouza). According to one authority, "Generation of accounting statements such as profit-and-loss statements and balance sheets are to a large extent akin to executive information systems. They provide investors with a snapshot view of a business's state but have low analytical or decision-making value" (Desouza, 2002, p. 37). Therefore, the potential value added by the use of executive information systems relates to how these tools are used. As Thierauf and Hoctor (2003) emphasizes, executive business systems "enable decision makers to access data, information, and knowledge in ways they never could before to obtain a better understanding in order to optimize a company's operations. This simple fact is the main thrust behind the growing popularity of smart technology" (p. 16). Likewise, Thierauf (2001) suggests that EISs provide executives with the types of information they need when they need it: "For the most part, these systems are helpful in making comparisons, analyzing trends and patterns in business, and presenting historical and current information to decision makers. Essentially, these systems assist decision makers in making better informed decisions that affect all aspects of a company's operations" (p. 4). Furthermore, digital dashboards in particular are capable of providing executives with customizable displays for reporting data from the… [read more]


Identity Theft in America and the Rest Term Paper

Term Paper  |  10 pages (2,851 words)
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Identity Theft

In America and the rest of the world that uses internet regularly the emerging issue or the problem is that of identity theft. It is considered to be the fastest growing crime in America as millions of victims have been reported over a period of last couple of years. Identity theft is a crime when someone uses the… [read more]


Microstat, Inc Term Paper

Term Paper  |  4 pages (1,631 words)
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Microstat, Inc. Case

Patrick McKinsey founded Microstat to work on marketing Notebook computers that he designed during his senior engineering project. To give his project commercial fruition, following some initial efforts he zeroed in on Leesung Electronics with whom he collaborated for manufacturing the most innovatively designed Notebook Computer. Patrick's point of differentiation was to include the state-of-the-art technology and… [read more]


Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Essay

Essay  |  7 pages (2,107 words)
Bibliography Sources: 4

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However, the important thing is that rules have been placed to protect the public at large from any abuses of the computer and Internet technology providers. No doubt though that some important contributions of the FCC to the betterment of computer and Internet technologies include "establishing the policy of the Computer Inquiries, deregulating the Customer Premise Equipment market (i.e., modems), and promoting ubiquitous and affordable flat-rate telephone lines (i.e., universal service). All of these were necessary precursors to the success of the Internet. (Cannon 2003)"

Wireless communications is one aspect of the provision of computer and Internet technologies. In this regard, the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau of the FCC is charged with the "development and execution of policies and procedures for fast, fair licensing of all wireless services, from fixed microwave links to amateur radio to mobile broadband services (FCC 2011)." This is done in coordination with other regulatory bodies charged with monitoring and supervision of information and communications technologies particularly with regards to computers and the Internet. More than likely, the mandate of the FCC will further increase once other innovations in wireless communications technologies become part of the mainstream of society especially when this type of technology will overshadow the wired technologies more common now.

The FCC can really be deemed as a government body that have always helped improved the communications milieu of the American society. It may still be a bureaucracy but nonetheless it is a bureaucracy that has continually redefined itself in order to meet the needs of the times. When it first started out as a small government body, the FCC ensured that radio communications are managed properly and provided the services they should provide the public. When television came into the picture, the FCC was not far behind and developed measures that would protect the viewing public especially the children.

The evolution of the computer and the Internet may have initially stumped the FCC because of the disruptive nature of these technologies; however, true to form as always, the FCC made headways into how these modern and emerging technologies improved the lives of the American public. The Computer Inquiries that the FCC initiated have been wildly successful [and] they followed a layered model of regulation and sought to constrain anticompetitive behavior where it occurred (Cannon 2003). Thus, some of the more improved services we are now experiencing with computers, the Internet and various wireless technologies were due in great part to the efforts of the FCC. Indeed, it may seem only fair for the agency to have a bigger budget in the next fiscal year because of the positive contributions it has been providing to American society. In addition, these contributions are not only confined to the United States but some of the FCC's policies have been adopted by other nations' communications regulatory bodies because of the workability of these rules and regulations. Thus, the FCC serves not only as a model government body for the country but for other nations as well --… [read more]


Technical Writing Instructions How to Use Writeboard.com Essay

Essay  |  6 pages (2,412 words)
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Technical Writing Instructions

How to Use WriteBoard.com

WriteBoard.com is a collaborative writing software program available online at http://www.writeboard.com. It is unique in that it allows multiple users to work on the same document at the same or different times, it allows you to save multiple versions of a document so you never lose a good idea (if you decide a… [read more]


Presence of Multiple Views and Voices Term Paper

Term Paper  |  30 pages (11,160 words)
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¶ … presence of multiple views and voices that includes mainly lay voices and to examine its interactions. (Eysenbach; Till, 2001) From a variety of resources, Marie Hoepfl tries to explain the important characteristic of qualitative research as that: Qualitative research uses the natural setting as the source of data. The researcher tries to study, explain and infer settings as… [read more]


Operating System Analysis Report: Microsoft Windows Server Term Paper

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Operating System Analysis Report: Microsoft Windows Server 2003 vs. Red Hat Enterprise Linux as

Operating System Analysis Report: Microsoft Windows Server 2003 vs. Red Hat

Enterprise Linux as

Microsoft Windows Server 2003 is a product of the Redmond-based software giant Microsoft Corporation which was founded in 1975 to supply MS-DOS Operating System or OS meant for the first generation of… [read more]


Cyber Crime Enforcement Term Paper

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Cybercrime

As little as ten years ago, few people could have conceived of the Internet and its capabilities, let alone know how to illegally take advantage of this new communication vehicle. Yet today millions of people use the Web, and online crime is increasing at breakneck speed. Although much discussion has occurred about cybercrime worldwide, much more is needed to… [read more]


Virtual Training the World Today Term Paper

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People will soon become more and more aware of this trend and I anticipate that it would affect the conventional form of training. Increasing number of people will opt for virtual training for its ease and efficiency. We will find more students using these services to learn about computers etc. At their ease and convenience. Professionals normally do not get enough time to go through formal training and thus they would also prefer to undergo virtual training where they can be trained through the phone or using webconference etc. Moreover people have noted that their ideas are more accepted in virtual group training as compared to conventional training where appearances can lead to people being judgemental about you. In virtual training programs people do not need to go through the artificiality of "dressing up" for their class. As it is its use is on the rise and without doubt I personally feel that the use of this trend will increase greatly as time passes.

REFERENCES:

(1) Ben Dean, Ph.D. -- How Therapists Can Coach Virtual Groups. [Online website] Available from: http://mentorcoach.com/vgroups.htm [Accessed on: 27/10/2005]

(2) Anonymous -- About Virtual Training. [Online website] Available from: http://ctap.ocde.k12.ca.us/video/aboutf.cfm [Accessed on: 27/10/2005]

(3) China Martens -- IBM to offer virtual training for startups. [Online website] Available from: http://www.itnetcentral.com/pcworld/article.asp?id=14879& info=PC+World& leveli=0 [Accessed on: 27/10/2005]

(4) Pete Thibodeau -- Virtual training for CSS soldiers. [Online website] Available from: http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0PAI/is_4_35/ai_105967730 [Accessed on: 27/10/2005]

(5) Laura L. Bierema, John W. Bing, Terry J. Carter. The Global Pendulum: In Which Direction Is Your Globalization Pendulum Swinging? The Future Search Conference Has Some Answers. Magazine Title: T& D. Volume: 56. Issue: 5. Publication Date: May 2002. Page Number: 70+.

(6) Kerry Colligan -- IT'd releases virtual training on the Web. [Online website] Available from: http://www.umich.edu/~urecord/9899/Nov16_98/10.htm [Accessed on: 27/10/2005]… [read more]


Top Cyber Security Risks Term Paper

Term Paper  |  4 pages (1,242 words)
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¶ … Risk Management in Top Cyber Security Risks

The Top Cyber Security Risks

The process of identifying, assessing, and prioritizing of risks is referred to as risk management. After identifying risks, the next step is to use the available resources to reduce, look into and control the risk from taking place again. Cyber security risks can be categorized into two namely website vulnerabilities and client-side application flaws. In risk management the high impact risk as it has a high probability of occurring should be handled first, risks that have low impact and low probability of occurring should be handled last.

Client-side application flaws

The applications installed on a person's computer may have certain vulnerabilities that can be exploited by the attackers. The attackers usually target popular applications like Microsoft word, Adobe Reader, Flash player and Apple QuickTime. These applications have serious security flaws, and they need to be patched regularly to ensure the security flaws are rectified. There are other software applications that have security flaws, and the software manufacturers do not release any patches to rectify this flaws leaving their users vulnerable to attacks Hansen & Nissenbaum, 2009.

Many people fall victim to this application attacks because even the major companies take too long to release patches to fix the problems. The attackers usually send someone an email that requires them to open file attachments and that way the person's computer get attacked by the viruses. Other ways that attackers use is placing malicious documents on popular websites. The documents have embedded code targeted for vulnerable applications.

To counter this risk computer users should ensure that their applications are well patched in case there has been a security flaw reported, or they should ensure they update their software applications on a regular basis. Users will need to ensure they do not click on links that they are not sure of, or downloading documents from emails and websites before they are scanned. Computers will need to have latest antivirus, antispyware, antimalware and intrusion detection programs installed to protect from any attack to the computer applications. It is also advisable to have programs that can detect, and remove any key logger applications that might be installed without the user's knowledge. Software applications makers should ensure that once security vulnerability has been discovered on their applications, they release a security patch that would update the application and fix the vulnerability. There are trends referred to as zero-day vulnerabilities. These vulnerabilities occur when there is a flaw in an application, and it is discovered before a security patch is availed. Attackers release a code that exploits this vulnerability until a fix is released or users find ways to mitigate against this flaw.

For organizational computers, it is recommended that the organization conducts its own assessment on application vulnerability. This assessment will assist the organization to counter any threats and attacks that they might face. Together with this assessment organizations should have antivirus software, strong firewalls, antimalware, intrusion prevention systems and antispyware programs… [read more]


Protecting Children Online Like Any Forms Essay

Essay  |  3 pages (789 words)
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Protecting Children Online

Like any forms of advancement, computer and information technology are double-edged swords. On one hand, they offer new opportunities for learning and self-expression. However, the same technology also threatens the safety of children, exposing them to inappropriate content and online predators. This paper argues that given these safety concerns, special measures should be taken to protect children from these Internet predators.

Protection legislation

In 2001, the Children's Internet Protection Act (CHIPA) was signed into law. The mandate of this act is to protect children form the myriad of "inappropriate material" available on the Internet. Public institutions such as schools and libraries must ensure that "technology protection measures" are in place on all of its computers with Internet access. These protection measures include filtering software to screen out inappropriate content (Reilly 2001).

Supporters of this measure argued that the task of keeping children safe from online belongs to everyone in society, not just to parents. After all, many children are much more tech-savvy than their parents. Increasingly, they surf the Internet in public places, such as cafes and their school libraries. This makes it difficult for parents to monitor the Internet use of their children.

Furthermore, supporters of this law argue that the dangers of unsupervised Internet use are very real.

In addition to sexually-explicit content, many teenagers have reported supporting their drug habits via the Internet. Many chatrooms are full of drug dealers and pedophiles who know how to recognize potential young victims or customers ("Teens, Technology and Drugs" 2006). The goal of legislation such as CHIPA is targeted towards ensuring a safe online experience for children.

Censorship concerns

Despite these dangers and the intent of this legislation, however, such protection laws have many critics. Privacy advocates argue that law enforcement authority and court rulings regarding piracy and copyright have dealt tremendous blows to individual civil liberties regarding online and Internet activities. Most people do not realize how much personal information can already be gleaned from the Internet. People unwittingly share information about themselves when they send e-mail, visit a website or buy merchandise online. The installation of filtering software adds to these concerns (Reilly 2001).

Other critics have argued that CHIPA and steps such as the installation of filtering software constitutes censorship. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has charged that such filtering software may be a violation of the…… [read more]


10 Forces Flattened the World Term Paper

Term Paper  |  10 pages (2,745 words)
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Ten Forces That Flatten the World

Three times Pulitzer Price winner Thomas L. Friedman is one of the most renowned contemporary authors. World wide, he is best acknowledged for his books and articles on technological development, globalization and war affairs, namely terrorism.

His latest publication is the book "The World Is Flat" which has registered immense success with his public.… [read more]


Ethical Issues in Information Technology, by Richard Research Paper

Research Paper  |  6 pages (1,835 words)
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Ethical Issues in Information Technology, by Richard T. DeGeorge

The world we live in is continuously changing and the most commonly used explanation is the rapid pace at which technology is developing. And since these developments have had significant implications to the global environment and lead to major improvements, their beneficial role is undisputed. However, one cannot dismiss the fact… [read more]


Transmission Media Article Review

Article Review  |  2 pages (549 words)
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Tranmission Media

Transmission Media

The media that has been used to transmit data over the years has advanced very far over the years. The last two to three decades in particular has been the stage for much of that progress given the explosion of personal computer and internet use that started in the mid-1990's. More than half a dozen different wired Ethernet standards have come about in that time frame with Gigabit Ethernet available for home use at very little cost to the consumer.

Wireless communications including MIMO have come as well. After starting very slow at 10-11 mbps with the B. standard, there have since been updates to the G (54 mbps) and N (150+) standards. The aforementioned MIMO technology allows multiple antennas to increase the overall throughput of the wireless communications.

Not all wireless internet has been a good thing. A good example of this was the TJX wireless internet screw up where they used cracked WEP encryption and it was compromised over a long period of time in a way that allowed credit card information to be stolen by several perpetrators. There have also been issues with the exploding use of wireless phones thus clogging up mobile phone networks with traffic thus slowing down the traffic for everyone. There has also been doomsday talk about all the IP addresses being taken up thus necessitating a six-part IP address but that is a limitation of the transmission hardware rather than the cables themselves.

Not all the news has been bad though. Rather than being anchored to a computer Ethernet cable-connected (or phone cable before that), people are able to plug in a…… [read more]


Technology in Emergency Management Term Paper

Term Paper  |  3 pages (797 words)
Bibliography Sources: 4

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According to Fincher, "This emergency notification method is far more comprehensive than other alternatives. The result is an informed public, armed with precisely the information its members need to respond in the desired manner. It also keeps citizens out of harm's way so that first responders can do their jobs" (2004, p. 31). The foregoing assessment of the importance of an interoperable communications network by Fincher (2004) is consistent with Davis (2007) who advises, "Communications networks that allow emergency managers to talk to police, fire and other first responders within a city or region have become important since the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks" (p. 3). In addition, emergency managers also use geographic information systems on a routine basis (Wayne, 2003).

Organizations Responsible for Emergency and Disaster Preparation

Besides traditional first responders such as law enforcement, fire and medical teams, the Department of Homeland Security, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Health and Human Services, Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Agriculture are all involved in preparing for cases of biological and chemical terrorism (Mughai, 2002). Likewise, urban disaster planning involves organizations such as the U.S. National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (Lu & Xi, 2007).

Conclusion

The research showed that emergency managers have a wide array of computer- and Intenet-based technologies available to help them mitigate the effects of natural and manmade disasters and emergencies of all types. These technologies included expert decision-making systems, as well as other technologies such as geographic information systems and computerized simulation models which are designed to help emergency managers plan ahead to mitigate the effects of disasters and emergencies. Finally, the research also showed that emergency telephone notification systems are among the most promising new technologies, with this application being capable of reaching most American citizens within a few minutes, providing them with the extra time that can spell the difference between life and death in emergency situations.

References

Davis, L. (2003, April 28). Nextel hosts public safety interoperability conference. Nation's Cities

Weekly, 26(17), 3.

Fincher, S. (2004, January-February). Efficient crisis communication is just a phone call away.

Public Management, 86(1), 31.

Lu, X., Xi, B., & Shen, W. (2007, January 1). Evaluating the maturity of urban emergency planning based on structure equation modeling. International Management Review, 3(2),

77-79.…… [read more]


Business and Society: The Microsoft Research Paper

Research Paper  |  8 pages (2,361 words)
Bibliography Sources: 5

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It is the violation of their right of freedom to participate and enjoy market share according to their abilities (Economides, 7).

Despite ignoring all these laws and rules, Microsoft acquired largest market share by its anticompetitive behvaiour, which can be defined as a behaviour consisting of a range of decisions which are made to actually or potentially harm the competitors… [read more]


Defending Against Trojans, Spyware Essay

Essay  |  2 pages (535 words)
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As like Bob, one of the best defenses a computer user may have is antispyware. Antispyware software will scan the computer for spyware files based on commonly known spyware files. When obtaining the antispyware software, Bob must determine whether an anti-adware software was also purchased. While anti-adware software is common, it is difficult to obtain it outside of a package deal, bundled with antispyware.

Taking Precautions:

Protecting Company Security at the Dismissal of an Employee

Hector has made the intelligent decision to enact certain securities to ensure that employees do not steal information upon their departure from the company. Understandably, he has taken away the rights and abilities for the employees to access software on devices upon their leaving. While Hector has taken almost every technological precaution possible, he has neglected to address the determination of an employee.

If a person is determined to take information with them, Hector's company must be aware that the employee will try to physically take it with them when they leave. This could be in the form of printed documents, tangible files, or other customer information that can be recorded or remembered off-hand. The company will want to secure more tangible material that an employee may try to sneak out of the office. To protect the company and its customers, the company will need to generate a contract that will require the employee to sign and agree that they will not use company information after they leave the company. Any files that employees may take or print must be shredded in the office, and information may not be taken home.… [read more]


Telecommuting Technology Has Reached Research Paper

Research Paper  |  12 pages (3,654 words)
Bibliography Sources: 10

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In instant messaging, the parties engage in a conversation similar to what one might have on the telephone but the individual comments are typed onto the computer screen and received immediately by the receiving party.

In the area of entertainment the internet has become like a portable television providing hours of entertainment for its user. Web sites have become the… [read more]


Videoconferencing in Business & Education Term Paper

Term Paper  |  7 pages (1,831 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

SAMPLE TEXT:

Our research found that videoconferencing is often used in the academic environment to reach rural and foreign communities. We discussed certain challenges that educators face when videoconferencing is used such as using technology to incorporate visual aids. Finally we discussed current issues involving the safety of videoconferencing. We discovered that hackers can gain access and control over a video conference very easily.

Appendix and References

Appendix A- Breakeven table for converting meetings to videoconferencing

References

Davis, A., Weinstein, I. "The Business Case for Videoconferencing:Understanding the benefits, costs, and risks of videoconferencing over ISDN and IP." March, 2002. Publication #567. Wainhouse Research. http://www.wainhouse.com/files/papers/WR-bizcase4vc.pdf

Delio, M. "Video-Conferencing Hole Exposed." Sep. 16, 2002. Wired News. http://www.wired.com/news/technology/0,1282,55145,00.html

Greunen D., Wesson, J. "Synchronous Learning: Using IT to bridge the gap in Distance Education." http://www.upe.ac.za/citte2000/docs/darellvg.doc

Schneider, Laura H.323 Protocol: Conferencing for One and All. 2002

http://netconference.about.com/library/weekly/aa012201a.htm

Schneider, Laura Video Conferencing: Easy as 1,2,3. 2002. http://netconference.about.com/library/weekly/aa060398.htm

Schneider, Laura Better Bandwidth Means Cooler Conferencing. 2002. http://netconference.about.com/library/weekly/aa112800a.htm

Bibliography

Davis, A., Weinstein, I. "The Business Case for Videoconferencing:Understanding the benefits, costs, and risks of videoconferencing over ISDN and IP." March, 2002. Publication #567. Wainhouse Research. http://www.wainhouse.com/files/papers/WR-bizcase4vc.pdf

Delio, M. "Video-Conferencing Hole Exposed." Sep. 16, 2002. Wired News. http://www.wired.com/news/technology/0,1282,55145,00.html

Greunen D., Wesson, J. "Synchronous Learning: Using IT to bridge the gap in Distance Education." http://www.upe.ac.za/citte2000/docs/darellvg.doc

Schneider, Laura H.323 Protocol: Conferencing for One and All. 2002

http://netconference.about.com/library/weekly/aa012201a.htm

Schneider, Laura Video Conferencing: Easy as 1,2,3. 2002. http://netconference.about.com/library/weekly/aa060398.htm

Schneider, Laura Better Bandwidth Means Cooler Conferencing. 2002. http://netconference.about.com/library/weekly/aa112800a.htm… [read more]


Breakthroughs Term Paper

Term Paper  |  4 pages (1,091 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

SAMPLE TEXT:

Network wires and cables are the mediums where data is transmitted during network communication. The type of these data transmission lines serves some factors in the performance speed of network communication. Two types of which are the twisted-pair cable and fiber-optic cable. In terms of the distance a data transmission can reach, fiber-optic is a better cable. Currently, however, a wireless networking has emerged in the field of network technology.

Network Interface Card (NIC) enables a computer to connect in a network. This is an internal device that processes data transmission before and after it passes through the network cables. NIC is an interface almost similar to video and sound cards. NIC, however, intends its usability in terms of network functionalities. For notebook computers, the PCMCIA is an NIC that connects to a network.

Hubs and Switches are hardware devices that control and regulate data transmission within computers in a network, as well as from and to a server. Mike Angelo, in his Some Basics for Computing and Networking Novices, defines Hubs and Switches as Hubs and Switches are special central electronic junction boxes where you plug in the network cables from the computers.

The Working Network

Networks have driving aspects that makes it work. These aspects are the network's technology, topology, and protocol. Ethernet and Token Ring are two of the many types of a network technology. TCP/IP and IPX, on the other hand, are among the popular protocols (How do Networks Work?) data packet is a network element sent to computers within a network. This packet serves as the storage data space of each computer, which it also sends to the other terminals after storing data in the packet. How data packets are sent to each computer depends on the type of a network's topology. For instance, a Ring Topology sends data packets to each computer in a circular manner (i.e one computer after another).

When a data packet containing information is sent to a computer, it compares its destination address against the computer's address. A match of address will enable the data packet to transmit the information to the computer. Otherwise, the data packet will continue searching for its destination until it is found. The process of sending, receiving, storing data, and sending back of data packets continue in a network until terminals are no longer connected.

Network applications and software make network communication possible. Such includes e-mails, Internet browsers, chat applications, etc. They are the mediums of communication between computer terminals connected in a network. Without these applications, a connected terminal will remain useless in terms of network communication.

Basically, the electronic wires, cables, network hardwares, software, and users, make a network communication possible. Without these elements, there will be no data sending and receiving.

Bibliography

Angelo, Mike. Some Basics for Computing and Network Novices.

Mozilla Quest. 01 July 2003. http://www.mozillaquest.com/shorts_01/MQ_Network-01_Story-01.html

Network Introduction.

NCI-Frederick. 01 July 2003. http://comm.ncifcrf.gov/networking/networkintro.html

How do Networks Work?

Cad.Strath. 01 July 2003. http://www.cad.strath.ac.uk/~davidm/projects/guide/how.html

How Network Works.

PNP Physiscs. 01 July 2003. http://www-pnp.physics.ox.ac.uk/~west/intro_manual/node223.html… [read more]


David Pogue's Column, Entitled, "Fisher Term Paper

Term Paper  |  3 pages (901 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

SAMPLE TEXT:

Thus, this new innovation deviates from the popular notion that Internet technology isolates the individual from the society; with telephony, people can create their social networks in 'cyberspace,' establishing new social ties and re-establishing old ones. Telephony technology's implication in the business of technology is that it aims towards a market that values not the product (telephony), but the service it provides (communication and interaction). As for its prospects in the industry, telephony technology is a flexible innovation that can be utilized both in the categories of business communications and home entertainment industry. Business communications are better improved by using telephony during meetings and conferences among businesspeople from all over the globe, while home-based consumers can communicate easily with their loved-ones by using telephony technology.#

The latest craze in home entertainment technology, the plasma flat screen TV, is the main topic of David Pogue's article entitled, "Prestige or Pixels?" In the January 29, 2004 edition of the New York Times (online edition). In this article, Pogue enumerates the pros and cons of buying big plasma TVs, which negates the popular 'infotech' credo that "smaller is better." Indeed, among the products in the home entertainment technology industry, television continues to evolve not only in its functions and internal features, but in its physical features as well. A bigger and flatter TV screen, which became the 'ideal TV' of most consumers nowadays, has resulted to the production of bigger plasma TVs sold commercially. Pogue especially centers his attention on popular brand companies that manufacture these plasma TVs, questioning whether the latest plasma screen TV fad is indeed a race for a better-functioning television set, or simply a case of the "They're selling prestige, not pixels" ideology. Indeed, Pogue's contention brings in the issue of consumerism by product and/or brand. In the age of information technology, consumers have become wiser at choosing products that suit their needs, and this is accomplished by looking at the functions of a particular product. The author's analysis in this article shows how consumers tend to prioritize style over substance, especially when buying aesthetically- and functionally-appealing products. Since plasma TVs are mainly catered to consumers primarily for home entertainment use only, the battle over selling 'prestige' is indeed stiffer, especially now that plasma TVs are sold at relatively cheaper prices, sold by small companies that produces these newest technology fad at low prices (as compared to major brand companies).#

Sources:

Croal, N. And J. Adams. January 5, 2004. "Soon, a (Nearly) Free Way to Phone Home." Newsweek, Vol. 143, No. 1. p. 6.

Pogue, D. January 22, 2004. "Fisher's Tiny New Camcorder." New York Times Online Edition. Available at: www.nytimes.com.

____. January 29, 2004. "Prestige or Pixels?"…… [read more]


Pricing Decisions in Today's Competitive Term Paper

Term Paper  |  2 pages (714 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

SAMPLE TEXT:

For example, recently the prices of the computers have drastically gone down, so for me the choice will be to lower prices so that customers do not but from the competitors.

Technology Environment and the Price

With growing technological sophistication, it has become usual for small companies to buy computer parts, build homegrown computers and sell them at throwaway prices. Seeing that a computer can be used for meeting various needs of the people, it is not unusual that the demand of the computers is still high.

The computer services sector is rapidly expanding to meet increased demand, as growing domestic businesses need the latest information technologies, equipment, and services. More small- and medium-sized businesses are becoming computerized. The government has a need for automation of its financial and educational institutions, customs agencies, and other state agencies (Ingenbleek, Debruyne, Frambach, and Verhallen, 289).

To meet the growing demands of the computers, it has become common for consumers to look for the best offers and buy computers at cheaper price, as a number of suppliers have proliferated. Seeing that one has many options to buy computers, I presume that the price of the computers will still become lower.

Economic Environment and the Pricing

The general economic condition has a drastic impact on the sales price of the computers (Lowengart, Mizrahi, and Yosef, 201). If the general economic condition is rosy, it is not unusual that people will buy various kinds of computers: a laptop for traveling, a high-powered computer through which a child can play video, and a computer for the Internet access. However, when economic conditions are not rosy, the demands for the computers will drop down. Seeing the present economic condition, presently I do not presume that there will be a surge of growth in the demand of computers so I envision even lower price for the computers.

References

Ingenbleek, Paul, Debruyne, Marion, Frambach, Ruud, and Verhallen, Theo M.M. Successful New Product Pricing Practices: A Contingency Approach. Marketing Letters, Vol. 14, No. 4; (2003): 289

Lowengart, Oded, Mizrahi, Shlomo, and Yosef, Rami. Effect of consumer characteristics on optimal reference price. Journal of…… [read more]


Data Input Accuracy Term Paper

Term Paper  |  3 pages (912 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

SAMPLE TEXT:

Choosing from these two methods, the best method of data input for telephone surveys would be voice recording. This is because voice recording of the participant's answers provides enough evidence that the answers directly came from the participant. Moreover, a voice recording method would be best for telephone surveys because there are some surveys that base the accuracy and reliability of the answers from how the participant answers and from the way the participant's voice sounds. Psychology studies indicate that the naturalness in the way a person speaks can indicate the speaker's sincerity and honesty.

Bank Checks

For bank checks, the best data input method would be optical scanning. Bank checks nowadays already have bar codes that validate the check's authenticity. By scanning such bar codes, banks can determine whether the bank check is valid or not.

Retail Tags

Similar to bank checks, the best data input method would be optical scanning. Most of the retail tags nowadays have bar codes that can provide the price of an item. Such bar codes prevent the falsification of price tags, thus allowing accuracy. By scanning retail tags' bar codes, stores can accurately and automatically obtain and input the price of the item to their cash registers. Customers can ensure as well that the amount charged to them is accurate. Bar codes and scanners are two of the most common elements in today's business and trading with customers. They are used on POS (Point of Sale) systems

Long Documents

There are several data input methods that can applicable for long documents. One is optical scanning which can be used to quickly input data, wherein the scanned image of the long document, such as.PDF and.JPEG formats, is used by systems as the reference and source data. Such method is an accurate form of input data because it preserves the real appearance of the document.

Another data input method that can be used for long documents is the automated transfer or automated conversion. This can be done by programs which automatically convert a document into another format. Automated transfer and input of data is made possible by processes within a system that read converted formats and automatically transfers and input them in the system's database.

Bibliography

Olson, J. Data Accuracy: The Challenge.

Retrieved July 31, 2004, from DM Review Online. Web site: http://www.dmreview.com/editorial/newsletter_article.cfm?nl=dmdirect&articleId=6019

Star, J. Data Input.

Retrieved July 31, 2004, from University of California Online. Web site: http://www.geog.ubc.ca/courses/klink/gis.notes/ncgia/u07.html

Methods of Data Collection.

Retrieved July 31, 2004, from Tutor2U. Web site: http://www.tutor2u.net/business/ict/intro_information_data_collection.htm… [read more]


Ethics in Cyberspace Summary Term Paper

Term Paper  |  9 pages (3,444 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

SAMPLE TEXT:

Irrespective of the real influence of the industry in our thinking the cyberspace crucially has become a new centre point in consonance with the neo-classical economic program of global capitalism. The corporate interests have paramount prioritization in the sphere of information technology, as is evident from the regulations for piracy, privacy, competitions in cyberspace along with, to some extent, the… [read more]


Jonathan Keats Essay

Essay  |  3 pages (917 words)
Style: MLA  |  Bibliography Sources: 1

SAMPLE TEXT:

John Koza's Invention Machine

The Industrial Revolution had profound effects on the human psyche and civilization as a whole. Machines began to do many of the things that human artisans and craftspeople used to do, and they did them faster and (arguably) better. Along with this advent of machinery came concerns and philosophical reflections about man's place in the world. Machines seemed to be taking over, rendering many human workers obsolete. The jobs that did exist changed in many cases from creative and engaging jobs to running and maintaining these machines, almost seeming to make humans subservient to the machines they created. Many felt that the lower-class workers were becoming nothing more than parts of the machines themselves, meaningless as individuals and useful only for how well they could accomplish repetitive tasks consistently and quickly for long stretches of time without wearing out.

Just as these effects of the Industrial Revolution called humanity's purpose and place in the world into existence, the invention and implementation of computers did the same thing, but on an even more profound level. Computers are machines that usually don't do anything physical that humans used to, but they do -- or at least appear to do -- something even more innately human -- they think. As computers developed further, concerns grew over which new class of human workers would be replaced by these new and remarkable machines. The idea of artificial intelligence was seen as a scary concept by many; it seemed to suggest that the machines we had built could eventually begin to make decisions and plans for themselves. Many science fiction writers and other social commentators and intellectuals believed that such a things was not entirely impossible. As computers grew ever more advanced, and began to be incorporated into other machines and entered new fields, these fears only grew.

In his article, "John Koza Has Built an Invention Machine," Jonathon Keats details how one man developed and built a computer with the kind of creative intelligence that has so long been feared, though (as yet) without any of the predicted disastrous results. There is one very important thing to note about Koza's creation -- though brilliant, this computer does not have any will of its own. Like any other computer, it needs to be given an initial set of instructions. After that, however, things change. The "invention machine" does not actually invent things itself, but it is able to tackle very complex problems and develop its own set of solutions without nay further input: "What Koza has done is to automate the creative process" (Keats, 2).

Koza himself calls the system that his computer uses "genetic programming." In a large part, his machine works along the same principles that have been…… [read more]


Object Well-Designed Everyday Object: The Apple iMac Research Proposal

Research Proposal  |  2 pages (690 words)
Bibliography Sources: 0

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¶ … object well-Designed everyday object: The Apple iMac

The Apple Corporation has distinguished itself as one of the most innovative computer companies in recent memory. Although some users praise the iMac for certain technological features that are inherently user-friendly, such as its imperviousness to viruses and its ease of use when going 'wireless,' those who are honest must admit that the first attraction of the iMac is its physical design. Computers, even the most technically literate would have to admit, were ugly -- before the iMac. The iMac in its tiniest laptop form or largest desktop incarnation is sleek, with soft, curving lines that make it look more like a makeup compact or a spaceship than an ordinary computer. It is designed for young people, as young people live in a world where working on a computer is more important to them than for previous generations. The iMac laptop is an accessory, something beautiful to carry to class as well as use for work. Apple technology can be customized in a variety of colors, and the color you choose naturally 'says' something about you, as a person. Your computer becomes a vehicle of self-expression on the outside as well as on the inside.

The iMac is also a triumph of branding. Unlike PCs, where it is difficult to tell the difference between a Dell and a Compaq on first glance, Macs are instantly recognizable. Being a Mac user in and of itself is a statement. Its edginess and uniqueness 'says' something about the user, when someone sees its owner carrying the device, or sees the iMac on a desk. The wide, beautiful screen with limited interference from the window display makes it look more like a picture than a computer. Both its keyboard and screen, in its desktop and laptop incarnation are whisper-thin, pared down to the barest essence. A clutter-free mind and a clutter-free workspace are all encouraged by the iMac. The lack of waste is evident even in terms of how the product is advertised. The website for the newest incarnation of…… [read more]


Human Interaction Discussion and Results Chapter

Discussion and Results Chapter  |  2 pages (747 words)
Bibliography Sources: 3

SAMPLE TEXT:

Human Interaction

If any of us in my neighborhood (my condo community) had the opportunity to change a technology to make it more user friendly, and frankly easier to navigate, certainly we would certainly do that. There is absolutely no doubt in this cutting-edge world of constant technology innovations and upgrades that there are many individuals like our neighbors who struggle to grasp the instructions and tools of technologies. People who are in their 40s, 50s, and 60s -- and even older -- do not catch on as quickly to user guidelines for new technologies.

Here's an example: O

n any Macintosh computer, it is very easy to take a screen capture. You simply do this: shift, command, and the #4 key. A little icon comes up and the user navigates the mouse and the keypad seamlessly around whatever copy or image he or she wishes to capture. There is a "click" like a camera going off (which in fact is what the computer is doing for the loser). And there on the desktop is the image that was just captured by the Mac's easy-to-use. Not so easy with an HP laptop.

My neighbor has a fairly new HP running Windows XP and she can't figure out how to get her machine take a screen capture. I showed her how simple it is on a MacBook, and we began using Google to get instructions on how to take a screen grab on her HP. One response told us to press FN + Screen Print, and that will switch it to print screen function. Nothing happened. No sound, no evidence of an image captured (of a photo she had on the desktop). Another advice column said use the "snipping tool" on a PC and it will be simple.

Snipping tool? Where? A search of the machine and no such tool was located. A third suggested instruction message said to use the "FN" (function key) and at the same time hold down the "Insert / prt sc" key at the top of the keyboard. That did nothing at all. Still another remedy was to hold down the "FN" key (by now we were certainly familiar with that key) and at the same time press "any…… [read more]


Subsets of {8, 16, 27 Assessment

Assessment  |  1 pages (337 words)
Bibliography Sources: 0

SAMPLE TEXT:

Find A ? B.

A = {h, e, j, n}

B = {e, b, u, j}

A ? B = {h, e, b, u, j, n}

Sets (Part II)

Create three sets, set A, set B, and set C. By going through the items you use at work (or in your field).

Set A will be a list of all of these items.

Set A = {computer, coffee, phone, Internet, cup, printer, pencils, pens, paper, snacks}

Create Set B, from the items in Set A that you think are essential.

Set B = {computer, phone, Internet, printer, pencils, pens, paper}

Create Set C, by taking the complement of Set B. In Set A, i.e. all of the non-essential items.

Set C = {coffee, cup, snacks}

Are sets B. And C. proper subsets of set A? Explain.

Yes. An improper subset is a subset containing every element of the original set. A proper subset contains some but not all of the elements of the original set. A subset…… [read more]


Functionality of the Microprocessor History Term Paper

Term Paper  |  3 pages (950 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

SAMPLE TEXT:

While 4004 was a 4-bit microprocessor, 8008 has an 8-bit architecture, twice as powerful as 4004, that accommodates alphanumeric data.

Next to 8008 of Intel was the release of 8080 microprocessor in 1974. 8080's development was considered the beginning of other milestones in the computer industry. From A Brief History of Microprocessors, Faggin stated that "The 8080 really created the microprocessor market. The 4004 and the 8008 suggested it, but the 8080 made it real." The first personal computer, Altair, used Intel 8080 for its microprocessor. This started the history of personal computer (PC). In the same year, Bill Gates and Paul Allen started Microsoft when they wrote a BASIC program for Altair (Taylor, 1997).

In 1976, another microprocessor of Intel was released - the 8086. 8086 was a 16-bit processor. Intel 8088 microprocessor came next in 1978. It was a 16-bit processor based from the 8086. Unlike 8086 however, which has a 16-bit data bus, 8088 only has an 8-bit data bus. IBM's first PC used the Intel 8088 chip.

The 16-bit 80286 of Intel was released in 1982. 80286 is six times as powerful as 8086, and can support an addressable virtual memory of 1GB and physical memory of 16MB. This chip was only used in a PC, by IBM AT, two years later after its release.

Intel's 80386, a 32-bit data bus and address bus microprocessor, was introduced in 1985. It was with 80386 that MS Windows and OS/2 commercially functioned. Intel 486, an enhancement of was released in1989.

Today, the Pentium family is the current commercially produced microprocessors of Intel. Intel Pentium was first introduced in 1993, which was followed by the Pentium Pro-in 1995, Pentium II MMX in 1997, Pentium II Xeon in 1998, Pentium III in 1999, and Pentium IV in 2002. As new designs of Intel microprocessor are released, the customer gets better computer processing performance.

Other Microprocessor Families

After Intel developed its first microprocessor chip, many companies began their business in the microprocessor market. Following are several historical dates of other microprocessor-producing companies.

1974 - Motorola released its NMOS 8-bit 6800.

1975-8-bit Zilog Z80 was launched. Zilog was established by Faggin and Shima, former Intel engineers. Z80 was said to perform better that its 8-bit counterpart of Intel.

1976-8-bit 6502 of MOS Technology was introduced.

1979 - Motorola released its 16-bit 68000 while Zilog introduced its Z8000.

1982 - While Intel released its 16-bit 80286, Motorola announced their own 68010 and 6805.

1984-32-bit 68020 of Motorala was introduced.

1987 - Z280, 16-bit version of Zilog's Z80, was released.

Bibliography

Taylor, Marvin. The History of Microprocessor.

1997. SIT.WISC.EDU. 31 Oct 2003. http://www.sit.wisc.edu/~mptaylor/microprocessor.html

Bellis, Mary. Inventors of the Modern Computer.

ABOUT.com. 31 Oct 2003. http://inventors.about.com/library/weekly/aa092998.htm

Woolley, Sandra. A Brief History of Microprocessors.

The University of Birmingham. 30 Oct 2003.…… [read more]


Computer Addiction Research Paper

Research Paper  |  3 pages (874 words)
Bibliography Sources: 3

SAMPLE TEXT:

Computer Addiction: Causes and Potential Cures

The determinants and predictors of computer addiction cannot be isolated only to a specific series of demographic, psychographic or socioeconomic variables, it is an equal opportunity disease. Empirical studies indicate that computer addiction is contrary to popular opinion, not just reserved for male teenagers who have been known to spend 48 hours straight playing games on their computers or engaging in online chat sessions (Soule, 65, 66). The determinants of computer addiction are more based on lineless and isolation, and the reliance on the computer as a means to find autonomy, mastery and purpose in life (Quinn, 175, 176). The symptoms of computer addiction include significant swings in a person's mood when they are online or off, whether they have been able to attain the level of activity on the computer they deem significant, and when denied access, conflict and feelings of anger, desperation and at times mood swings that bordered on psychosis (Soule, 72, 73). Computer addiction's best cure is to remove patients from the often extreme isolation conditions they have and create more suitable triggers of dopamine release, including accomplishing tasks in the real, not virtual, world (Quinn, 174, 175).

Analysis of Computer Addiction

It has been problematic for researchers to isolate a specific series of attributes or traits that distinguish those that are predisposed to computer addiction relative to those that aren't. This has made prediction difficult and opponents of the research, including PC hardware and software companies, able to refute these claims of their products being the basis of health problems for consumers (Neumann, 129, 130). Fortunately PC manufacturers including Apple and others have also studied the implications of computer addiction in the context of ergonomics and usability, and discovered that those that seek recursive feedback constantly, creating virtually what they need in person, are the most prone to this psychiatric condition (Neumann, 128, 129). The quick release of dopamine is at the center of the computer addictions millions of people have today (Soule, 72). The Internet acts like a dopamine accelerator for computer addict, accelerating the physiological and psychological changes their brains go through when interacting with their computer and especially the Internet (Quinn, 175, 176). The continual isolation that society today is continually creating along with the affinity that dopamine creates when it finds a source are powerful catalysts of behavioral change. The combination of these two factors are being helped along with the growing role of social media in general and Facebook specifically in people's lives. Posting on Facebook gives Internet addicts a dopamine rush that is highly addictive and lead marathon sessions of…… [read more]


Computers and the Internet Term Paper

Term Paper  |  5 pages (1,343 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

SAMPLE TEXT:

He explained that while computers are providing good things to humans, humans may have the wrong notion that computers can do everything, thus exaggerating the definition and true purpose of computers. According to Roszak,

The loose but exuberant talk we hear on all sides these days about "the information economy," "the information society," is coming to have exactly [the] function [of] ambitious global definitions that make it all good things to all people. [T]heir very emptiness may allow them to be filled with a mezmerizing glamor. These often- repeated catchphrases and cliches are the mumbo jumbo of a widespread public cult. Like all cults, this one also has the intention of enlisting mindless allegiance and acquiescence. People who have no clear idea what they mean by information or why they should want so much of it are nonetheless prepared to believe that we live in an Information Age, which makes every computer around us what the relics of the True Cross were in the Age of Faith: emblems of salvation

Because of this, schools may be taken for granted by humans who may soon totally rely and depend on the technology of computers. As we currently have, some of this technology includes the educational software available in the market.

In response to Roszak's idea, what he's speaking about the technology that may overrule the purpose and function of schools for our literacy is possible. Nowadays, it is a trend for people to rely more on the benefits and advantages of computers. And as seen in many schools, technology is being applied as a large part of education.

Sherry Turkle's Simulation

Perhaps what Sherry Turkle means, when she says."..they also accustom us to manipulating systems whose core assumptions we may not understand..." In reference to simulation games, is that we may not be able to fully understand everything that is embedded, and that comprises, technology but we can get accustomed in using it nevertheless. As with simulation games where a computer user may not completely know everything in the game, but is able to play much of it anyhow, technology may accustom us to lose interest in exploring things as long as we are able to manipulate it. In such case, Turkle is concerned that we must challenge our built-in assumptions rather than just let rely on them. Relying on self-assumptions and intuitions is one threat of technology that may accustom us.

When Turkle says "in the real world we have never had a greater need to work our binary assumptions," she perhaps means that it is a fact that most people rely on assumptions anyway. Usually, people never explore things out. Rather, they just let their basic instincts rule them.

PowerPoint Carries Its "Own Way of Thinking" Where "Presentation Becomes Its Own Idea"

This means that the use of technology, like PowerPoint, allows the delivery of more idea to its audience.

Aside from the idea that a student may try to present in his PowerPoint presentation, the tool itself can… [read more]


Internet Globalization Good or Bad Research Paper

Research Paper  |  6 pages (1,813 words)
Bibliography Sources: 5

SAMPLE TEXT:

Internet

The globalization of the Internet has spawned a rash of cyberattacks on the U.S. Department of Defense and a number of its contractors. One such example was the Poison Ivy attack on Booz Allen Hamilton, which was designed to pull sensitive data out of the company's computer network via an email attachment (Grow, Epstein & Tschang, 2008). Poison Ivy,… [read more]


Internet and Global Finance Research Paper

Research Paper  |  20 pages (5,161 words)
Style: MLA  |  Bibliography Sources: 10

SAMPLE TEXT:

From the statistics presented by the Internet World Stats, 2.4 billion people around the world were using internet in 2012, which represented 34.3% of the world population. Between 2000 and 2012, there was a tremendous growth of 566.4% of internet users. Despite the growth in the internet users globally, the internet penetration rates varies across the globe. The North American… [read more]


Regulating and Governing the Internet Research Paper

Research Paper  |  3 pages (989 words)
Bibliography Sources: 0

SAMPLE TEXT:

Regulating and Governing Internet

Regulating and Governing the Internet

Annotated Bibliography

The focus of this paper is to provide the annotated bibliography of the following articles: Nair, a. (2007). Internet Content Regulation: Is a Global Community Standard a Fallacy or the Only Way Out? International Review of Law Computers & Technology. 21 (1): 15 -- 25. The author argues that internet undoubtedly contains valuable amount of information and resources, which make the internet to become a way of life. Despite its major importance, the internet also has its dark side.

Policy makers are facing challenges to reach global consensus on the strategy to regulate the children phonographic. Typically, the borderless nature of the internet has been a major factor leading to the difficulties in regulating the content on the internet to protect the children from the phonographic content. The United States has made an effort to regulate the internet content by passing the Child Online Protection Act 1998 (COPA) and Communications Decency Act 1996 (CDA), however, these regulations failed to pass a constitutional tests in the court of law. The author suggests that internet needs to be regulated from many layers to protect children from the phonographic content.

2. Choi, C.J. Kim, S.W. & Yu, S. (2009). Global Ethics of Collective Internet Governance: Intrinsic Motivation and Open Source Software. Journal of Business Ethics. 90:523 -- 531. The authors argue that the ethical governance in the global internet is accelerating within a global phenomenon. A key paradox of a global internet is that it allows decision makers and individual to co-exist among one another making OSS (Open source software) communities to become an accelerating global phenomenon. Typically, OSS refers to a group of software assisting in code sharing among corporate users. Despite the importance of OSS, the motivation behind the OSS has generated wide debate among policy makers and researchers. Analysis of the OSS communities with the viewpoint of knowledge creation, collective internet governance and intrinsic motivation make the authors to conclude that OSS has a fundamental implication on the governance and business ethics in the 21st century.

3.

Mansell, R. (2011). New visions, old practices: Policy and regulation in the Internet era. Continuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies. 25(1): 19-32. The author focuses on the interest of corporate organizations on the internet evolution and the roles of governments in regulating various services and infrastructure in the internet. The paper highlights the alliances between the neoliberal political and economic agenda in the internet regulation. Typically, neoliberal strategies alongside the private organizations are discussed to manage information diversity in the internet. However, author reveals that there is a conflict of interest in the internet regulation because the internet regulation will have an effect on the availability of the open network.

Part 2: Reflective Diary - Regulating and Governing the Internet

In the contemporary business environment, internet has become a critical tool for business communication. The growth of the internet has facilitated easy way of accessing…… [read more]


Vose, D. (2008). Risk Analysis Annotated Bibliography

Annotated Bibliography  |  6 pages (1,740 words)
Bibliography Sources: 6

SAMPLE TEXT:

Section 404 has been specifically discussed that outlines the internal control assessments required of the firms. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) also requires publicly traded companies to comply with Treadway Commission's Committee of Sponsoring Organizations (COSO). The case of Motorola IT governance model is taken to demonstrate how compliance with SOX can be ensured for data and IT security by organizations. The article observes that SEC fails to provide specific guidance on IT security; rather it leaves room for interpretation by firms. There is brief mentioning of SOX acts that outline compliance related issues such as Sections 302, 404, 409, and 802 of SOX 2002. The article concludes with an observation that firms with least effective IT security made decisions related to IT governance at the level of business unit managers. Most effective firms in terms of IT governance made IT decisions by engaging three main stakeholders i.e. top management, business unit managers, and IT specialists.

Capelli, D., Moore, A. & Trzeciak, R. (2012).The CERT Guide to Insider Threats. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Education, Inc.

The book is written on the subject of 'insider attacks' related to abuse of information security in an organization. The book identifies and explains potential information technology (IT) system's vulnerability from insider sources of an organization such as employees,… [read more]


Broadband Internet Service Term Paper

Term Paper  |  8 pages (2,921 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

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The company also hopes to rent its MS Office features over the internet through the use of broadband connections. Windows Media, MSN TV, and interactive television platforms all require or will require high-speed broadband connections. So confident is Microsoft in broadband, that it is making significant financial investments in broadband providers AT & T. And Comcast. Microsoft competitors Sun Microsystems… [read more]


Social Disintegration Via Internet Term Paper

Term Paper  |  7 pages (2,044 words)
Style: APA  |  Bibliography Sources: 5

SAMPLE TEXT:

Computers and Society

The Internet has facilitated communication, commerce, and information dissemination. However, the downside to the Internet has become the topic of recent research due to the proliferation of digital media and the ways the computer has infiltrated human society. Well before the Internet flourished, computers replaced human beings in multiple job sectors, leading to loss of livelihood and… [read more]


Internet and Society Annotated Bibliography Annotated Bibliography

Annotated Bibliography  |  2 pages (627 words)
Bibliography Sources: 2

SAMPLE TEXT:

Internet and Society

Annotated Bibliography

Goldsmith, JL. (2003) "Against Cyberanarchy." Who Rules the Net? Internet Governance and Jurisdiction. Ed. Adam Thierer and Clyde Wayne Crews. Washington, DC: Cato Institute, 31-70.

"Against Cyberanarchy." Who Rules the Net? Internet Governance and Jurisdiction is a group of journal articles that detail the multifaceted development of the internet and who, if anyone if in "control" of it through its inner workings. The article demonstrates both the pros and cons of internet anonymity. The foundational work demonstrates the need for both the anonymity of the net and also the specific controls and constraints that reduce the ability of individuals to utilize the net to commit crime, but also to maintain the free expression that is associated with the information technology of the internet.

Evaluation: This work, better than any others I have read details the nature of the internet and the ease of access it provides to those who have the intention of utilizing it to invalidate the historical acceptance and enforcement of intellectual properties. Copyright, regulations as well as many other issues of intellectual properties have historically been essential to the control of profitability of many intellectual pursuits, including artistic expressions associated with entertainment. Yet, this work also details the need to develop situations and circumstances, such as those found on the net that stress and support the importance of free expression and easy access to such free expression.

Mann, C.C. (Sept. 2000) "The Heavenly Jukebox." The Atlantic Monthly: 39.

Summary: "The Heavenly Jukebox," is a magazine article that deatails the need for the music industry to recognize both the risks and gains that can be obtained through the development of internet music technologies. The stress of the article is that the music industry fears the potential for piracy of intellectual properties, and yet needs to recognize that the real losses are not as great as has…… [read more]


Internet Changes Lives Research Paper

Research Paper  |  13 pages (4,025 words)
Bibliography Sources: 13

SAMPLE TEXT:

Internet Changes Lives

How the Internet Changes People's Lives:

A Fantastic Story of a Once-in-a-Lifetime Discovery

How Internet Changes Lifestyles

The Internet technology revolution has been the single greatest story for the success of capitalism and innovation in the post-Cold War world. Beginning in the 1990s and until today, the Internet has affected nearly every human being on Earth, whether… [read more]


Is the Internet Changing the Way We Think? Research Paper

Research Paper  |  7 pages (2,304 words)
Bibliography Sources: 10

SAMPLE TEXT:

¶ … Internet Changing the Way We Think?

Today, the internet has become a conduit of sorts for the exchange of information from all corners of the world. In a big way, the internet continues to ease access to information from a variety of sources. This is largely desirable. However, there are those who are convinced that such convenience has… [read more]


Computer Is it Anyway? Term Paper

Term Paper  |  2 pages (591 words)
Bibliography Sources: 0

SAMPLE TEXT:

Should management be allowed to monitor all Internet use?

Management must be allowed to monitor all Internet use. Since access to the Internet is considered as among the resources of a company, it is only fitting and proper for them to have the right of knowing that their resources are not misused and abused by their employees. After all, it is the responsibility of the employees to make use of the company's Internet access for the right purpose. Otherwise, if they have other intentions in accessing the Internet, they should instead do it out of their company's facilities.

Should employees be warned if email is to be monitored?

If emails are to be monitored, it is also a good etiquette to inform the employees. This is to protect the employees' rights to privacy and confidential information. For instance, some personal emails, though not malicious, might contain confidential matters for employees. Thereby, if they are informed that their emails will be monitored, they can choose not access in the office their personal emails.

What specific reasons can you give to support an Internet crackdown by management?

The first reason why Internet crackdown is done by management is that they need to ensure that their employees make use of office hours for the company's benefit and not just for their employees personal activities. Another reason is that managements need to protect company information from malicious disclosures that employees might make.

What specific reasons can you give to oppose a crackdown?

Internet crackdown removes the right of employees to privacy and confidentiality. All that they access from the Internet can be traced and read by the management. Thereby, employees cannot even make use of their break times for…… [read more]


IT Security Lang, David. A Graphic Picture Term Paper

Term Paper  |  3 pages (958 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

SAMPLE TEXT:

IT Security

Lang, David. "A Graphic Picture of Crime." ASIS. Sept 2002.

The article "A Graphic Picture of Crime" begins with a tale of an 'everyman' or 'every person' wireless Internet user named John whose computer is hacked from a distance by a criminal named Frank. Frank uses his laptop to mimic John's wireless network and the wireless router's Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), the protocol that assigns Internet protocols. Not only does the article explain how this newest twist in intellectual property theft, that of robbing a user of his or her digital footprints and using the protocol for criminal purposes, is accomplished, it also shows the legal difficulties in tracing such a crime and outlines what one can do to prevent such a crime from being committed against one's self in the first place.

The investigation of such crimes remains difficult from a legal perspective, although less so than it used to be. Traditionally, investigators of intellectual property theft had to prove that the alleged criminals had stolen, intellectual property in the form of direct observation or sworn testimony from direct witnesses. Now, for Internet crimes of intellectual property, by law, investigators need only to obtain a court order to require the Internet service provider (ISP) make subscriber information available to law enforcement so that the investigators can contact the private homeowners whose connection has been hijacked.

Then, they investigators can obtain consent for a search from the individual whose accounted was hacked into and gather information about any unauthorized computers that used the owners' wireless network via a router. A router collects data on every computer that sends information through the network, including the computer's address on the Internet and each computer's unique identifier from the factory, called the MediaAccess Controller (MAC) address. A MAC address that does not correspond to any computer in the home indicates an outside has exploited the wireless network connection.

Later, after Frank is 'captured' and the investigators can obtain a warrant search the working memory of the alleged offender's computer, the random access memory (RAM) or primary storage area where calculations and data manipulation occur. The forensic examiners are most concerned with the section of slack space known as RAM slack, swap files, and deleted information from slack space and swap files. Examiners can thus create a timeline and confirm that Frank downloaded and decrypted the instructions from the Internet before using stenography software to hide his progress. Forensic investigators use password-cracking techniques to recover encrypted instructions to be decrypted as well as the stenography tool password needed to extract Frank's report the graphic file. This gives the investigators now have probable cause to obtain search warrants for several ISPs hosting the various Web sites used by the gang for transferring information, and finally the gigabytes of logs and transaction records retrieved via the investigator's data mining and visualization software…… [read more]


Consequences of Computer Technologies on Educators Term Paper

Term Paper  |  3 pages (980 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

SAMPLE TEXT:

Internet and Online Education

Moon

In order to fully understand the impact of online courses and to place them within their proper social context it is important to understand how the idea of online learning developed. A literature review reveals a growing body of sources related to the history of the Internet and it social relevance. The following will explore this research and will summarize it in order to gain a proper understanding of its social significance.

History of the Internet and Internet-Based Courses

The concept of educational courses where the student did not have to be physically present in the classroom began soon after the first television set was introduced. The original concept of the television was that it would be a means to educate a population in a highly efficient manner (Freed, 1999). However, corporate greed soon took over and the educational purpose of the television soon became secondary to the advertising potential.

The first telecourse began in 1959 and continued into the early 1960s. Sunrise Semester involved a teacher, standing before a class with a camera that was shooting over the heads of the students. The program was dropped due to a lack of funding (Freed, 1999). Sesame Street and other educational programs arose from these early efforts (Freed, 1999).

The first true telecourse was offered by Coastline Community College in 1976. Courses were broadcast over public television to universities and libraries in Orange County. At the same time Dallas Community College began producing video courses for export to other campuses (Freed, 1999). Considering these early forerunners it should not be surprising that online courses sprang up quickly after the invention of the Internet.

In 1991 the World Wide Web as we know it was born (Leiner, et. Al, 2000). In a search for the oldest online school on any level, the jury is still out. There were many schools on the Internet that claim to be the first. It was difficult to draw any type of conclusion on this subject. However, one thing became apparent. There are hundreds, or perhaps even thousands of online schools offering anything from preschool to MA and PHD level instruction.

Universities first began giving students access to the Internet in the early 1990s (Freed, 1999). The Internet provides many opportunities for distance learning and has many advantages over early distance learning courses and the face-to-face classroom. The Internet allows for on-demand video, audio, text, and graphics, immediate access to vast libraries of research material, and real time interaction between teachers and students (Freed, 1999). Now systems are being developed that provide these services with improved speed and quality.

Social Ramifications of Internet-Based Courses

The Internet has changed almost everything in our lives. It has changed the way we communicate, the way we do business and the way we learn. The Internet has acted as a leveling force between large and small corporations. The Internet has given customers and students more choices.…… [read more]


Computer Security Briefly Support Your Own Opinion Term Paper

Term Paper  |  8 pages (2,728 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

SAMPLE TEXT:

Computer Security

Briefly support your own opinion about the ethical principles of the Lamers group before formation of the SecureThink Company. Briefly support your opinion about the ethics of the hiring of SecureThink by the MoneyBags record company.

The Lamers group initially gets formed out of a curiosity and sense of challenge the members have about how to crate robotic… [read more]


Computers VPN as a Company Essay

Essay  |  3 pages (1,000 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

SAMPLE TEXT:

That outer packet guards the contents from public view and makes sure that the packet moves inside a virtual tunnel. This layering of packets is known as encapsulation. Computers or other network devices at both ends of the tunnel, known as tunnel interfaces, can encapsulate outgoing packets and reopen incoming packets. Users who are located at one end of the tunnel and IT personnel who are at one or both ends of the tunnel arrange the tunnel interfaces they're accountable for to use a tunnelling protocol. "Also called an encapsulation protocol, a tunnelling protocol is a standardized method to encapsulate packets" (Tyson & Crawford, 2012).

Using a VPN can have a key impact on a company by increasing sales, product development can be speed up, and strategic partnerships can be made stronger. Prior to VPNs the only other alternatives for generating this kind of communication were costly leased lines, Frame Relay or ATM access circuits. A high service quality VPN has prospective to be better then conventional circuits like ISDN and Frame Relay, as well as give the company considerable cost savings. "These costing savings can range for 30% to 80% depending on the type of leased line and its destination. For example a large corporation with offices all over the world can save substantial amounts of money on communication costs by introducing a VPN" (Why do Companies use VPN, 2011).

A well-designed VPN provides a business with many benefits. Some of the most significant include:

Extended connections across multiple geographic locations without using a leased line

Improved security for exchanging data

Flexibility for remote offices and employees to use the business intranet over an existing Internet connection as if they're directly connected to the network

Savings in time and expense for employees to commute if they work from virtual workplaces

Improved productivity for remote employees

A business might not require all these benefits from its VPN, but it should demand the following essential VPN features:

Security -- The VPN should protect data while it's traveling on the public network. If intruders try to capture the data, they should be incapable to read or use it.

Reliability -- Employees and remote offices should be able to connect to the VPN with no trouble at any time (unless hours are restricted), and the VPN should provide the same quality of association for each user even when it is handling its utmost number of concurrent connections.

Scalability -- As a business grows, it should be able to extend its VPN services to handle that growth without replacing the VPN technology altogether (Tyson & Crawford, 2012).

References

How Virtual Private Networks Work. (2008). Retrieved from http://www.cisco.com/en/U.S./tech/tk583/tk372/technologies_tech_note09186a008009

4865.shtml

Mutrux, Z. (2008). Introduction to Virtual Private Networking (VPN). Retreived from http://www.techsoup.org/learningcenter/networks/page4775.cfm

Tyson, J. & Crawford, S. (2012). How VPNs Work. Retrieved from http://www.howstuffworks.com/vpn.htm

Why do Companies use VPN? (2011). Retrieved from http://www.alliancedatacom.com/why-use-vpn.asp… [read more]


Computer History Museum Virtual Trip Online Term Paper

Term Paper  |  2 pages (647 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1

SAMPLE TEXT:

Cloud Computing Virtual Trip

Cloud Computing Virtual Field Trip: Computer History Museum

Description of the Event

After having taken a virtual field trip to the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA (http://www.computerhistory.org/) over the last week from home via the Internet, an appreciation of how interconnected and integrated the areas of mathematics, physics, electronics and the current state of computing and the Internet are today. The website is excellently designed to provide for drill-down on specific content areas and the history of technologies that support computing today, in addition to showing the unique aspects of software, the Internet and ground-breaking research by Google (Computer History Museum). The curators of the Computer History Museum have created excellent online materials for those who are taking a virtual field trip. The map to the right shows the entire museum including the specific locations of exhibits that are also provided online. After having looked at several museums online, this specific one was chosen for the virtual field trip.

Source: http://www.computerhistory.org/planvisit/

Why -- How it Fit My Interests

The Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA has exhibits and archives that align with several of my interests. Of particular interest is the initial research Dr. Metcalf undertook in defining the TCP/IP protocol, which much of the Internet runs on today (Computer History Museum). The History of the Internet online tour is among the most complete online-based tours of computer museums today. Visiting the online tour, it is apparent how challenging the initial efforts at integrating computer systems was, and how critical the parallel developments of minicomputers, ARPA-Net and software were to the initial stages of integration and complex computer networking (Computer History Museum).

Another fascinating exhibit is the Silicon Engine. This exhibit showcases the timeline of silicon technologies including circuit boards, memory chips and microprocessors. There is also a thorough analysis of the timeline of silicon-based development, profiles of the key inventors and industry leaders in this…… [read more]


Regulating Internet Privacy Research Paper

Research Paper  |  3 pages (957 words)
Bibliography Sources: 0

SAMPLE TEXT:

Regulating Internet Policy

Regulating Internet Privacy

The paper provides the annotated bibliography of the three articles. The paper also provides the reflections on experience, opinions, attitudes and feelings with regard to the ethics and information technology (it).

Jacquelyn and Polito (2012) in their article titled "Ethical Considerations in Internet Use of Electronic Protected Health Information" reveal that patients, caregiver as well as family members are increasingly relying on it and social network websites for communicating, storing and referencing medical information. However, HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) Privacy Rule seeks to protect the patients' privacy by protecting their health information to assure the information is only available to people who deliver the healthcare service. In the United States, the government has made laws and policies to safeguard patients' privacy; however, the laws are inadequate to safeguard patient's privacy against the present rapid development of information technology and innovative use of electronic health websites. The authors identify the medical ethics as an effective strategy to protect patients' information against misuse of patients' information.

Lugaresi, (2010) in his article titled "Electronic privacy in the workplace: Transparency and Responsibility" argues that regulating the use of internet within the workplace has become challenging for the law enforcement agent. In spite the intervention of DPAs (data protection authorities), law, scholars and other public bodies, there are still no persuasive, and exhaustive legal responses for the enhancement of electronic privacy within the workplace. The employee's expectations of electronic privacy generally collide with employer's needs to monitor online activities. The author argues that employees' right to electronic privacy is not absolute; however, employees' right to electronic privacy must be in line with employer's electronic privacy policy to safeguard organizational data.

Falzone, (2013) in his article titled " Regulation and Technology" argues that technology development can derive a tremendously benefit from government involvement, and part of the government involvement in regulating technology is by assuming that technology is a private good similar to the private property that government should regulate. Typically, the internet is a very good example that the government should regulate. Presently, internet has become part of life of people globally. Thus, government regulation is essentially to enhance internet privacy. However, the author points out that both government and private organizations should implement internet regulatory policies to enhance ethical use of the internet.

Part II

In the contemporary business environment, the use of internet and information technology has become part of the business strategy and modern method of doing business. The internet has become part of life for both businesses and individuals. Despite the importance of internet and it foe consumers and businesses, regulating the use of internet to enhance its ethical use has become challenging. The present regulations to enhance the internet privacy are not sufficient in the face of internet hacking and other external penetrators who are using the internet technology…… [read more]


Computer History Museum: A Virtual Term Paper

Term Paper  |  3 pages (802 words)
Bibliography Sources: 2

SAMPLE TEXT:

Once connections were enabled and the Internet became ubiquitous in the household, innovations proliferated. The Internet illustrates something very profound about communications technology, namely it is only useful and interesting when you can talk 'to' someone, and communications applications on their own, until they become common, are mere curiosities.

What I learned

The most profound thing I learned, in reviewing the grand sweep of the history of computers is the degree to which computer have become a part of daily life in a way they were not when they were first conceptualized. The earliest computers were as large as small rooms and even in supposedly futuristic scenario movies like 2001, computers were primarily entrusted to do 'heavy duty' rather than mundane tasks. Today, it is the everyday computers that have had the most profound influence upon changing the ways that human beings interact with one another.

It is interesting to see how different trends have occurred, ebbed away, and then reasserted themselves. For example, in an age in which few people typed other than secretaries, the 1980s saw the ascent and rapid decent of the 'pen' computer, a computer on which people could write notes. However, today, stylus computers were resurrected on blackberries before becoming obsolete once more with the popularity of touchscreens. Almost everyone today possesses the capacity to type, thanks to the common skill of word processing, but even this may began to once again be an obsolete skill as technology changes.

How does it apply to my main interest?

The unpredictability of technology and how it changes human life is the final message that was underlined to me by my visit to the Computer Museum. Even the inventors of the Internet's most basic technology could not have predicted the degree to which it would change everyday life and communication. Many people even prefer texting to talking, because of the comfortable distance online communication offers them.

We are 'mobile' computers today ourselves, forever carrying our 'network' baggage with us, wherever we go. In the past, this was regarded as a quaint idea, as parodied in this photo of a computer on a bicycle, but today the vision is an accepted reality.

Work Cited

"The Web." Computer History Museum. [5 Dec 2012]

http://www.computerhistory.org/revolution/the-web/20/394… [read more]


Database Administrator Term Paper

Term Paper  |  7 pages (1,982 words)
Bibliography Sources: 5

SAMPLE TEXT:

The number of database administrators to be working on the field is expected to grow much faster than the average for all occupations through the year 2018. This is because the Internet and E-commerce will continue to expand massively, resulting in a continuing need to build and maintain database management systems. Also, the increasing importance that is being placed on cyber security, i.e., the protection of electronic information, will require many workers skilled in the task of information security. [5: Database Administrator." 19 March 2010. .]

The salary range for the job of Database Administrators is highly dependent upon the industry they are present in and the location of their workplace. Rates tend to be higher in the financial services and banking, investment and insurance sectors. The salaries for Database Administrators typically lie in the range from £25,000-£30,000 per year. After an experience of working as a DBA for around two to three years, the salary range tends to shoot up to a figure of around £35,000-£40,000 per year. Subsequent to gaining experience and fulfilling the role of a DBA in this field for a time period of about ten to fifteen years, the salary usually rises to a benchmark between the amounts of £40,000-£60,000 per year. Freelance work and self-employment is also possible in this work-field after a few years of experience. The working environment is mostly informal and it is possible for work to be carried out from home or from other remote locations using modems, laptops, email and access to the internet. There is an increasing trend towards working from home. [6: Staff, Yahoo! Education. "Telecommuting Careers." Yahoo! Education. March 2012 .Work CitedSpeciss College. ."Database Administrator." 19 March 2010. .Microsoft. "Database Basics." Microsoft Office. March 2012 .Prakken Publications. "Database Administrator?" (n.d.).SFIAPlus. "Database Administrators." British Computer Society (Retrieved 2012-02-06).Staff, Yahoo! Education. "Telecommuting Careers." Yahoo! Education. March 2012 .]

Nevertheless, the role of a Database Administrator is a vital one for his or her employers, as most of the functions in these organizations heavily rely on the successful performance of the duties of a DBA. Although a tough job, this makes them one of the most sought after professionals by enterprises all over the economy, rewarding them accordingly with heavy pay checks for the nature of the work they perform.

End Notes… [read more]


Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Single Research Paper

Research Paper  |  8 pages (2,445 words)
Bibliography Sources: 10

SAMPLE TEXT:

DDoS is an approach used to attack a victim from several undermined systems. The former are central to similar mechanisms as those of DoS attacks (Chang, 2002). However, for an attacker to accomplish an attack, they will need to execute DDoS software on many vulnerable computer systems. In DDoS attacks, the attacker will use numerous sources hosts to launch attack… [read more]


Computer Networking in Today's Society Term Paper

Term Paper  |  5 pages (1,518 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1+

SAMPLE TEXT:

cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/cisintwk/ito_doc/introlan.htm#xtocid2. http://www.dcninc.com/whatawan.htm

Kathy Ivens, Home Networking for Dummies, (John Wiley & Sons, 2002) p.20.

Jeff Tyson, "How Home Networking Works," located at http://www.howstuffworks.com/home-network.htm/printable.

CERT Coordination Center, "Home Network Security," located at http://www.cert.org/tech_tips/home_networks.html#III-A.

See id.

H. Gilbert, "Introduction to TCP/IP," February 6, 1995, located at http://www.yale.edu/pclt/COMM/TCPIP.HTM.

IBM Redbook Abstract, TCP/IP Tutorial and Technical Overview, located at http://publib-b.boulder.ibm.com/Redbooks.nsf/RedbookAbstracts/gg243376.html?Open.

Selena Sol, "Internet Protocol," August 16, 1999, located at http://www.wdvl.com/Authoring/Tools/Tutorial/IP.html.

Computer Networking, located at http://compnetworking.about.com/library/glossary/bldef-ipaddress.htm.

Intranets.com, "What is an Intranet?," located at http://www.intranets.com/ProductInfo/Intranet.asp.… [read more]


Computers on Traditional Writing Term Paper

Term Paper  |  1 pages (376 words)
Bibliography Sources: 1

SAMPLE TEXT:

Literacy is also affected, because grammar and literary "rules" are often ignored in the rush to communicate, and so, the printed word online often results in incoherent gibberish that is accepted as the norm. As the author notes, "The experience becomes fragmentary and malleable, or oral, rather than unified and stable, or literate, and information retains a fluidity in computer-mediated communication that it lacks in traditional literacy" (Ferris). Therefore, communication on the computer becomes more "oral" rather than written, and this has changed the way we communicate all through our culture. Ideas flow more fluidly and quickly, and brainstorming is easier to do with partners throughout the world.

Clearly, the written word online has altered our culture in many ways, some not always for the better. However, online communication is here to stay, and the full effects on our culture are yet to be seen.

Bibliography

Ferris, Sharmila Pixy. "The Effects of Computers on Traditional Writing." University of Michigan Press. August 2002. 29 Oct. 2003. www.press.umich.edu/jep/08-01/ferris.html… [read more]

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