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Education and Learning There Have

Additionally they are forced to nod in a certain way to express the fact that they are paying attention to what is being said. Students have to immediately look at their peers when they are speaking. When this is viewed by an outsider it was mentioned that it seems like a rather odd phenomenon. Additionally, the students are made to…

Pages: 10  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Sustainable Further Education FE Teacher Education Training in the UK

¶ … Education Teaching the Teachers Teaching primary and secondary school children is one of the most challenging careers that there is. One of the most significant challenges of the profession is that for the classroom teacher who spends her or his days surrounded by children or adolescents, the job can be supremely isolating. The classroom teacher, inspired each day…

Pages: 28  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 60


Special Education Teacher Burnout

Special Education Teacher Burnout High levels of stress are dangerous for all professions. In the field of special education it is responsible for much of the symptoms associated with variant levels of burnout. When teachers begin to experience burnout it is important for administrators to engage in remedial steps that reduce the individual and wider professional effect of burnout. Failing…

Pages: 8  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 10


Lack of Administrative Support for the Special Education Teacher

Special Education and Inclusion Even at best, the teaching position is a challenge, particularly in public schools. Teachers are often required to work with unruly students and difficult parents. They are required to offer the majority of their time and dedication to the profession. Many come to the profession with high ideals and hopes of making a change for the better in people's lives, and many do so with continued enthusiasm and joy. However, challenges such as school policy, colleagues, and an unknown culture among the school staff, along with the above-mentioned elements relating to students and their parents, make it difficult to keep up the enthusiasm required to reach the initial goals. As such, teaching is often mentioned in the same category as nursing for the almost superhuman self-sacrifice often required by the job. It is therefore little wonder that many come to the profession with bright eyes and happy hearts only to leave five years or less later. This is particularly true of Special Education teachers. Special Education teachers face all the above-mentioned challenges related to teaching, with the added difficulty that they are required to help students, each with a unique set of both personal, psychological, and learning challenges. The Special Education teacher is required to assess these and provide teaching to help these students achieve their highest potential. As the work of Special Education teachers are not related to a specific grade level, isolation often results. This isolation occurs on a number of different levels. Most importantly, because the Special Education teacher tends to function apart from the other grade level teachers, social isolation occurs in the workplace. This also leads to emotional and psychological isolation, particularly for new teachers. Special Education teachers find difficulty relating to their peers within the school the difficulties that they face in their task, as their task is relatively unique as compared with the rest of the teaching work in the school. Indeed, Susan D. Whitaker (2001), cites this sense of isolation as one of the reasons why special education teachers tend to leave either the specific field……

Pages: 2  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 2


Special Education Teacher's Impressions of High Stakes

Special Education Teacher's Impressions Of High Stakes Testing And How That May Impact Preparing Their Students To Take Those Tests SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER'S IMPRESSIONS of HIGH STAKES TESTING and HOW THAT MAY IMPACT PREPARING THEIR STUDENTS to TAKE THOSE TESTS This objective of this work is to understand how special education teachers' attitudes, preparation, background and so forth may be…

Pages: 30  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 30


Education - Teaching Methods Educational Methods in

Education - Teaching Methods Educational Methods in Teaching ESL Reading and Writing The purpose of this work is to interview a teacher who specializes in teaching English as a second language and to ask the teacher about the effect of students' cultural and prior educational backgrounds on their school performance. The questions will be asked of "What accommodations does the teacher make to help students adjust"? What kinds of materials or activities has the teacher used with success with English learners and what kind of programs does the teacher consider best for English learners and why?" Interviewee: Kregg C. Strehorn, ESL Educator What are the effects of students' cultural and prior educational backgrounds on their school performance? Answer: Culturally speaking the student from a family that is supportive and interested in their educational attainment is the student that is much more likely to be successful in school and the student who is more likely to "like" school and thrive educationally. If the student is from a family who does not value educational achievement then it is likely the lack of encouragement or disinterest from the aspect of the students' cultural environment will stifle the student in learning as well as educational achievement. Question Two: What accommodations does the ESL teacher make to assist the student adjustment? Answer: It is very important is the clear expression of what is expected from the student in terms of classwork. The major elements needed in teaching the ESL student effectively are Provide adequate feedback; 2) Clarify goals; 3) Have consistency in Teaching Style; 4) Lessons need routine or framework; and 5) Have Cultural awareness. Stated is that: "By explicitly stressing this kind of seemingly trivial information, the teacher can save a lot of valuable class time and create a much more productive atmosphere." Question Three: What type of program does the teacher consider best for English learners and why? Answer: Universal Instructional Design (Silver, Bourke, & Strehorn) is stated by teacher to be a process that started when, according to Kregg C. Strehorn: began to open the classroom and attempt to make it more accessible to all students." Strehorn believes this……

Pages: 3  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Special Education Teacher Shortage: An Overview in

Special Education Teacher Shortage: An Overview In the article "The Supply of and Demand for Special Education Teachers" Flippin, Mcleskey & Tyler (2004) discuss the critical shortage of special education teachers that currently exist in the United States. The authors point out that the shortage is a chronic problem evidenced in all geographic areas of the nation. The authors attempt to analyze what factors have influenced the supply and demand for special education teachers in recent years, and address the magnitude of the shortage of teachers available in the U.S. Information is pulled from a variety of data sources for the investigation, including the U.S. Department of Education Special Education Unit and the National Center for Education Statistics survey. Their investigations reveal that 98% of school districts have reported special education teacher shortages in the last several years, with a 1999 survey showing special education as the area with the fewest number of available teachers in most major metropolitan U.S. cities. Their study also shows that special education teachers were particularly in shortage for treating children with emotional and behavioral disorders, followed by individuals with "multicategorical, severe or profound disabilities" then those with learning disabilities. Other statistics pointed out by the researchers show that although more than 38% of special education students are culturally and linguistically diverse, less than 14% of the teachers available in the field are from culturally diverse ethnic groups. This may impact a teachers' ability to relate to student with multicultural backgrounds. Finally, the researchers conclude that drastic measures be taken to alleviate the shortage of special education teachers that currently exist within the U.S. There is some research available which supports the notion that special education teachers are more likely to be recruited via alternative certification programs. The authors conclude that further research is needed however in order to determine whether approaches such as this are likely to be successful for recruiting diverse personnel to work in the field of special education. In addition, the researchers conclude that three factors determine the perceived demand for special education teachers. These include: student enrollment, teacher caseload and teacher attrition. The research suggest that further research is also necessary within these three areas. The data that is available support the notion that the number of special education teaching positions available in schools will likely remain unfilled but the demand for special education teachers will remain unchanged. In addition…

Pages: 3  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Physical Education Teacher Burnout and PE Teacher Concerns

¶ … Aaker (1991, p13) it is the general aim of all researchers not only to discover new information but as much as possible to build on what other people have already done in the field. This is particularly important as these works whether published or unpublished can serve as a cheaper source of mobilizing data. It also helps the…

Pages: 25  |  "Literature Review" Chapter  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 25


Disappointments of Educational Reform in

However, fortunately for pupils, their families and teachers as well, schools had learned something from the mistakes of both the earlier, highly stigmatized segregated classes and the problems of mainstreaming as well. Which brings us, more or less to the present. There are currently two major sets of challenges facing teachers of self-contained special education classes. The first of these is to create a curriculum that is appropriate for the members of the classroom. This can be a challenging task indeed given the widely varying developmental levels that usually exist together in a class as well as the range of ages. Adding to these challenges, which have long attended the special-ed teacher, is the additional challenge faced in many special-ed classes today of children whose first language is not English. The complexities of working with immigrant children are substantial in and of themselves; when these immigrant children also have developmental problems, the complexities of reaching them and providing an appropriate educational can indeed seem overwhelming at first. The second set of challenges facing the special-ed teacher lies in the issue of the stigma that is attached to special education. This is not a trivial issue or in any way subsidiary to the academic one. Education is the process of preparing young people for the world. Part of this preparation includes providing them with certain skills, such as literacy. But part of this preparation includes providing them with emotional and social skills as well. Indeed, this latter part is probably even more important than the former for self-contained special education classrooms. This is, of course, not because special education children are not teachable in terms of academic skills but rather that, inhabiting a much smaller social world than their counterparts, they have fewer chances to learn essential citizenship lessons. This paper suggests ways in which the special-education teacher can meet both of these challenges at once, providing children them with both the academic and social skills that are essential for each individual to have a successful - because rewarding - life.……

Pages: 3  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Physical Education Teacher if You

This describes a continuum, where at one extreme is the direct, teacher-led approach and at the other lies a much more open-ended and student-centered style where the teacher acts only in a facilitative role. The teaching styles are: 1. Style A Command - teacher makes all decisions 2. Style B. Practice - Students carry out teacher-prescribed tasks 3. Style C. Reciprocal - Students work in pairs: one performs, the other provides feedback 4. Style D. Self-check - Students assess their own performance against criteria 5. Style E. Inclusion - Teacher planned. Student monitors own work. 6. Style F. Guided Discovery - Students solve teacher set movement problems with assistance 7. Style G. Divergent - Students solve problems without assistance from the 8. Style H. Individual - Teacher determines content. Student plans the program. 9. Style I Learner Initiated - Student plans own program. Teacher is advisor. 10. Style J. Self Teaching - Student takes full responsibility for the learning process. (AAHPERD 2001) The Spectrum offers a range of options to teachers that can accommodate students' diverse learning styles and meet the learning intentions of a teaching session more accurately. The Spectrum also provides a sound basis for analysis of one's teaching and the effectiveness of selected styles to meet particular learning intentions (Tinana 2003). It emphasizes relationships between the different styles, rather than their differences. It follows that effective instruction in Physical Education takes account of this variety in teaching styles and an ability to use the style that is most suited to the teacher (Coates 1997). By the same token it would be misplaced to assume that a given style is associated with a particular physical activity area or sport. The Spectrum is never intended as a straitjacket: quite the reverse. It permits a huge degree of freedom and celebrates the creativity of the individual teacher. In this way teaching is both art and science. Conclusion In teaching physical education the effective teacher is involved in adjusting and reviewing tasks set according to the needs and responses from the students. Being able to use various teaching styles identified in Mosston's framework creates an optimum working environment, maintains good discipline, sets high standards, facilitates pupils' thinking and achieves the multiple learning objectives integral to Physical Education. This positive instructional framework is surely worthy of serious consideration in our teaching of Physical Education. Bibliography Bennett, N. "Recent research on teaching: A…

Pages: 4  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Education - Teaching Methods Evaluation of Webquest

Education - Teaching Methods Evaluation of Webquest Chiang, Judy. "The American Revolution: Was it worth it?" 19 Oct 2007. http://questgarden.com/47/76/3/070311160651/ The introductory page of the Webquest "The American Revolution: Was it worth it?" is strong and provocative. It encourages students to engage in critical thinking from the very beginning of their research. This section asks the Webquest's users if they would have joined the colonists who revolted against the British monarchy. It uses age-appropriate language for students in Grade 5 but still takes the students seriously as critical thinkers about historical and political issues. To make the question relevant to the student's lives the introduction asks: "What are you willing to lose in order to fight for something that you want to gain?" This question could apply to a variety of historical, political, and even personal questions the students will face in school and life. The Webquest teaches how to think as well creates a task that will teach 5th grade students about an important period in American history. Task The task is multifaceted. It involves group and individual research, which ensures that individuals collaborate and discuss the issues, but are not reliant upon others to do all the work. This is one of the dangers of only requiring group activities to teach about any particular subject. The task is dynamic and interactive. Students are not just researching answers to a list of factual questions. They are always creating something unique throughout their 'quest,' in the form of posters and then a persuasive essay. The essay question of "was the American Revolution worth it" is subjective in nature and encourages students to engage with history rather than merely accept their teacher's and common wisdom's received opinion. The main task is to research the American Revolution and to write a persuasive essay using the student's new knowledge of the times. They must write in a way that would be persuasive to the American colonists. Then, students, using the historical information available to people of the era will decide if fighting the Revolutionary War was worth the consequences. This encourages students to look at things from an ethical perspective, weighing the pros and cons of going to war. However, in an age-appropriate fashion it asks the students if they would have fought the war themselves, personalizing the activity in a way to make history interesting to young students. Process The guided process…

Pages: 3  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Learning Journals in Higher and Continuing Education

¶ … Learning Journals in Higher and Continuing Education (2002), Arthur M. Langer of Teacher's College at Columbia University, examines in-depth and with great authority the issue of utilizing learning journals "as vehicles for encouraging critical reflection among non-traditional students" and for comparing "variances with studies among traditional students" (2002, p. 337). In this case, non-traditional students are those who have not attended an institution of higher learning in many years or have never attended such institutions, mostly comprised of adults over the age of 50 (Petersen, 2005, p. 224). Overall, Langer's main focus is to clearly understand how adult students in a "technical computer class responded to the requirement for learning journals" in a classroom setting, while the qualitative research provided in this article focuses on whether "learning journals have been proven to be an effective teaching tool" in science-based classes (2002, p. 337). Therefore, the basic research question asked by Langer concerns "how the use of journals has impacted the learning process of adult students" and how this impact "compares to those of traditional students" (2002, p. 337). As to the article's literature review, Langer provides a rather long and detailed analysis of former and existing literature on the subject of using learning journals in higher education. Most of these share common themes concerning "their use as learning tools" and focus on three major areas of research-first, the overall value that such journals contribute to the student learning process in the fields of science, engineering and higher mathematics; second, how learning journals offer a transition between theory and practice; and third, how the various kinds of learning journals have been used in the past "to facilitate critical reflection in student learning" objectives (2002, p. 339). Langer also provides some examples related to a computer technology curriculum, such as J.A. Moon's suggestion that there are clear indications "of the manner in which learning journals have been used to facilitate learning" in the above-mentioned disciplines and the fact that learning journals have been shown to initiate the replication of facts and ideas in students enrolled in science classes (2002, p. 339). In addition, it has been demonstrated that science students who maintain learning journals, being "much like a diary in which a student writes down what has been learned and any new ideas that deserve some exploration" (Wilson, 2004, p. 245), have improved upon their personal learning and communications skills…

Pages: 4  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Cooperative Learning for Secondary Education

Education Cooperative Learning - for Secondary Education When teaching in a secondary classroom I see students who are all at various reading and writing levels. There appears to be a wide range of varying abilities with my students in regards to their writing skills. Writing skills help a student attain self-determination, clarity, fluency and creativity in writing. If students master these skills, they will be able to write so that not only they can read what they have written, but other people can read and understand it too. Some students have outstanding writing skills while others struggle to get anything down on paper. As a result of the things that I have seen I am interested in seeing the effects of peer review activities on the writing skills of those students who are struggling particularly in the area of fluency. Fluency skills for writing include: be familiar with the linear sequence of sounds mastering writing movements and letter shapes distinguishing the chunking of words identify the need for space between words writing rapidly It is important to build self-confidence through the use of peer review groups. In these groups students share their papers with one another, reading them aloud, and then asking for responses. For the first paper, only positive responses are allowed. Soon students get over their fear that the response group will be five people attacking their writing where only one had done it 'before. Each 'participant is vulnerable since each reads a paper to the group. Consequently each becomes sensitive to the needs of the student who's asking for help. Criticism is supportive, designed to help the student improve their writing. Questions How will small group, peer review activities contribute to students' writing skills and how will this affect their overall fluency? Sub-questions What activities would be the most helpful for students to increase their fluency? Overall……

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Democratic Education Question No. What

Why do you think neoliberalism has become the dominant discourse of education, despite the fact that Finland seems to go against most of the tenets of neoliberalist education and yet scores so well on the PISA tests? Is it the inevitable way that the world is moving and education needs to adapt, or are there other models that should be…

Pages: 8  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 6


Distance Learning in Adult Education

Higher Education Distance Learning in Adult Education History of Distance Learning Throughout the nineteenth century, in the United States, several activities in adult education paved the way for the organization of university extension beyond campuses. In 1873, Anna Ticknor formed the society to encourage studies at home for the purpose of educational opportunities for women of all classes in the…

Pages: 5  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4


Personal Philosophy of Education

Personal Philosophy of Education Teaching today has become a challenging profession. Not only are teachers required to maintain a good relationship with their students and the learning material they are to master, they are also required to function within a certain educational and political context. These divergent needs and requirements can be quite exhausting, and it can become difficult for…

Pages: 4  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


Video-Based Instruction in Distance Learning

Education - Distance Learning DISTANCE LEARNING: ARTICLE SUMMARY According to the article, distance learning is an effective alternate means of educational instruction that considerably broadens the spectrum of useful methods of academic instruction as well as task-oriented vocational training. While distance learning does not necessarily require the use of a video component, the advantages of video-based instructional programs include the receptivity and enthusiasm of students for instruction through a visual medium. In that regard, the author suggests that even completely informal "instruction" such as in the form of passive learning from watching commercial television is also associated with information retention, or learning as well. Optimal learning results combine auditory components with information presented through the visual medium, but in that regard, the specific format of the auditory component is comparatively less important. Comparable learning is achieved whether the auditory component is presented simultaneously or after the fact. Likewise, whereas early incarnations of video-based instructional programs tended to feature a human instructor on the screen, contemporary research has demonstrated that the inclusion of an instructor is not directly related to the effectiveness of distance learning programs. In principle, this is thought a function of the dual mechanisms of cognitive learning through visual and auditory information in general. More particularly, the author also suggests that, if anything, the auditory component of successful distance learning experiments may be underappreciated by virtue of assumptions that successful video-based learning experiences are incorrectly attributed to the value of video specifically. The author suggests that empirical information is comparatively lacking in the area of……

Pages: 2  |  Thesis  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Special Education Goetze and Walker (2004) Found

Special Education Goetze and Walker (2004) found that students who are most at risk of academic failure are those who lack reading skills. They found that use of technology enhanced literary capabilities of students who have special needs (Goetze and Walker, 2004). In fact, technology and literacy have a very strong link and scholars have been keenly interested in discovering…

Pages: 16  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 16


Exceptional Student Education

¶ … Student Education What were the two main findings in the PARC Case (1971)? One of the key findings in the PARC v. PA (1971) case was that failure to provide students having mental retardation with access to public schools went against the Fourteenth Amendment's equal protection clause. The second key finding in this case was that failure to…

Pages: 3  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Education: Teaching Math to Students With Disabilities

Student Websites There also are a number of websites that are specifically geared towards assisting students with or without disabilities at all grades deal with math topics that they do not understand. Five of these have been outlined below. i) The Alberta Government Website: http://www.learnalberta.ca/Home.aspx This site provides registered users with easily understandable resources/reading materials and assessment questions on lesson topics of their choice. A new user has to register for an account, in which they provide information on, among other things, their grade. Once the account has been created, the user logs in and selects a lesson topic from study skills, current events, geography, math, or reading. The site then avails relevant books and simplified reading materials on the requested topic, and a set of accompanying assessment questions. ii) The NCTM site: http://illuminations.nctm.org/ This online resource provides a number of interactive applets that make it possible for students to learn through practice. The applets range from operations and numbers, to profitability & data analysis as well as measurement, geometry, and algebra. The site avails simplified resources and gauges the students' understanding by getting them to take part in interactive math games and quizzes. iii) Math.com: http://www.math.com/ This online resource avails games, practice, and online tutorials on math concepts at all grades (Oldham County Schools 2 of 3). Subjects offered include calculus, statistics, trigonometry, geometry, algebra, pre-algebra, everyday math, as well as basic math. By way of an online tutorial, students receive assistance on their homework, and are administered with study and test preparation tips, references, as well as formulas and tables. iv) BrainPop.com: http://www.brainpop.com/ This resourceful website offers online tutorials on any lesson topic in the areas of Art & Music, Health, Technology and Engineering, Math, English, as well as Social Sciences. Lessons in math include Algebra, Geometry & Measurement, Probability, Data Analysis, Numbers & Operations, and Ration, Proportion & Percentage. The site provides a printable assessment at the end of the tutorial, through which students can gauge their understanding (Oldham County Schools 2 of 3). v) The National Library of Virtual Manipulatives (NLVM) website: http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/vlibrary.html This site provides a wide array of virtual interactive manipulatives in the realm of Probability & Data Analysis, Measurement & Geometry, Algebra, and Numbers and Operations. It targets students from all grades. The manipulatives present, among other things, formulas, real-life illustrations, and simplified techniques of tackling complex mathematical problems. Works Cited Oldham County…

Pages: 3  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Assessments Measure Learning in Colleges and Universities

In my own future position as a faculty member, I fully intend to study the most pertinent, most applicable assessment techniques and implement them -- with emphasis on learner-centered themes. Discussion The time has come for reform throughout higher education, including business schools as well as liberal arts and science-based institutions. The trend should be away from emphasis on what instructors should teach and toward a more learning-centered approach, which utilizes some of the assessment strategies presented in this paper. And if the true value of the learning experience does not lead to a student being inspired as well as knowledgeable, then the experience of higher education could be seen as an exercise in futility. On the other hand, when believable, proven learner-centered assessment approaches are the agenda, the college and university experience can be fruitful for the student and for the American society. Works Cited Nilson, L.B. (2010). Teaching at its Best. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Stivers, B., and Phillips. J. (2009). Assessment of Student Learning: A Fast-Track Experience. Journal of Education for Business. 84(5), 258-262 Webber, K.L.……

Pages: 5  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Shortage of Special Education Teachers

Chronic Shortage of Special Education Teachers "If teachers are well-prepared in both content and pedagogy, 'it makes an enormous difference not only to their effectiveness in the classroom but also whether they're likely to enter and stay in teaching'… [and] it is 'more expensive to under-prepare people, and let them spin out again, than it is to prepare people more…

Pages: 8  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


Higher Ed Journal the Use of Learning

Higher Ed Journal The Use of Learning Journals in Higher Education The study conducted by Langer (2002) provides consideration of a progressive approach to observing learning outcomes. Identifying 'learning journal' usage as a way of monitoring weekly learning outcomes for students, the study by Langer makes as its primary area of consideration a method of student evaluation that might bring more nuance to the grading system. The interest is of particular value, the discussion conducted hereafter will show, with respect to non-traditional students, who may be less inherently responsive to the parameters or implications of a grading system. This points us to the primary research question driving Langer's study. Langer asks what the variance is in the experience of non-traditional vs. traditional students when using learning journals as a part of the regular learning process. In order to initiate an investigation on the subject, Langer composes a literature review detailing the theoretical and practical history of the learning journal as a tool for educational improvement. He reports to the value of learning journals historically in such reflective fields as science, mathematics and engineering. Here, Langer refers to Harmelink (1998) as a researcher who yielded positive research outcomes where science students kept journals constructed to improve learning and communication. These findings are further endorsed by Selfe et al. (1986), which underscores the idea of learning journals as a way of improving conceptual learning approaches separate from grade-based performance. The research showed that while grades did not necessarily improve in students, the learning journal did help to improve the development of abstract reasoning and problem-solving capabilities. A subsequent section in the literature review consider the transition of learning journals in theoretical discourse to practical usage. The literature review credits Dart et al. (1998) and Johns (1994) for preliminary examination of this usage. A final section of the literature review identifies various types of learning journals. Here, Langer identifies structures, unstructured and dialogue journals as different approaches which may be taken in practical application of the specific strategy. In proceeding from the literature review, Langer makes the argument that "the existing literature on the use of learning journals in higher education indicates that it can be an effective learning instrument." (341) the research also finds that there is typically an adjustment period as the student works to gain comfort with this novel learning approach. These literature findings underscore the qualitative, comparative population approach…

Pages: 4  |  "Literature Review" Chapter  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Cooperative Learning in Elementary Classrooms

Education -- Cooperative Learning Cooperative learning is a teaching methodology that has been widely studied and evaluated in connection with student motivation, learning, cooperation, social, and emotional benefits. That is particularly true at the elementary and middle school levels; it has also been linked to significant improvement in the integration of mildly learning disabled students into standard classrooms. Provided instructors…

Pages: 6  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 6


Learning Centered College Statement

Education - Statement LEARNING-CENTERED EDUCATION PERSPECTIVE as a faculty member, I would try to incorporate learning-centered college concepts into my classroom as much as possible and in particularly in any manner that facilitated student motivation directly. Toward that end, I would encourage students, including first semester freshmen, to consider every elective course as an opportunity to prepare them for their future. In that regard, I would counsel students to consider the relevance of every course with respect to anticipated career goals; in the case of students with little idea of the ultimate direction of their goals, I would suggest that they view every academic course as an opportunity to consider potential areas of related interest. In principle, I would caution against selecting courses without at least some very general idea of what relevance or potential relevance it may have with respect to future professional or advanced educational goals. Ideally, I hope to have the opportunity to incorporate elements of Gardner's Multiple Intelligence approach by introducing my students to the concept of acquiring relevant knowledge through a broader means of information transmission than the traditional passive learning in the lecture-based model. While primary and secondary school are the optimal settings for the fullest incorporation of Gardner's principles, college students can be encouraged to explore different types of media to help identify their greatest strengths. All too often, students never have any opportunity to consider the possibility that alternate modes of instruction might increase their retention. For example, I would encourage students to propose alternate sources of comparable subject matter as a means of identifying untapped learning strengths. In some cases, students would have the first opportunity to explore the potential……

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Becoming a Reflective Practitioner

¶ … Education Individual learning When a student is asked to personally read to a teacher, there is both a feeling of 'specialness' combined with an increased desire to perform well. Of course, if a child is selected for individual instruction as a punitive measure, this feeling of being singled out might have a negative dimension. However, if the teacher makes use of individualized instruction to ask questions about the story that stimulate the child's curiosity about the tale, if the teacher uses the moment to engage the child about matters personally of interest to the child that are revealed in the reading, and the child is engaged as an active and equal partner in his or her learning the experience of reading to a teacher can have a unique, added dimension of pedagogical value. Furthermore, for shy children, being able to read and explore a story without the pressure of speaking aloud to a class of his or her peers can act as a confidence-builder that eventually translates into a wider social situation. Even for children without reading difficulties, the social relationship fostered by reading to a teacher can create a positive feeling about school that translates into better performance. I recall from my own experience that when I was in a class with few friends, although reading was one of my stronger subjects, the ability to read aloud to a teacher and have other individual learning experiences with my teacher enabled me to 'get through the year' and remain focused in a positive fashion on my schooling. Teaching away from the classroom Field trips, interactive assignments like staging a school play, or simply going out into nature for a science or an art lesson can make schooling seem less……

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Online Education

Online Education Online Learning vs. Traditional (in-Class) Learning Whether students prefer online learning or in-class learning largely depends on many factors, including how much socialization a student is looking for and whether he or she is happy with the commute and the classroom setting. Some students also go back to college after having been in the workforce for some time,…

Pages: 28  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 15


Improving the Resource Room

Special Education Improving the Resource Room in Special Education The resource room special education teacher must work with a variety of students of varying needs, all at the same time. The teacher must meet the needs of students with a number of disabilities, which may include autism, emotional problems and learning difficulties. This philosophy does not allow the teacher to provide education for the individual student in the least restrictive environment. The educational requirements of these various students require interventions that are specific to their particular circumstance. This research will explore the proposal that policies within the special needs department must be made that provides more specialized teachers for each group of students with a particular type of disability. This proposed strategy would require special education teachers to specialize further in their field. For instance, the LD teacher would be matched to LD students. EI teachers would be matched to students that require these specialized services. This would allow the teachers to specifically meet the needs of the student and be able follow their IEP more closely. This system has several advantages over the current methods used in the special education resource room. Teacher Qualification Using the proposed strategy that matches teacher qualifications to the specific needs of the children will result in teachers that are better equipped to deal with the specific needs of the student. Every disability, or group of disabilities requires different intervention strategies (ISER, 2007). Yet, special education teachers are required to meet the needs of this varied group using a format that uses a "one size fits all" approach to special needs. The teacher is more likely to be more or less experienced with certain disabilities than others. Those students that have disabilities with which the teacher has less experience may suffer. The teacher is likely to become stressed over the inability to meet the needs to students that are not in his or her realm of teaching experience or education. Providing a higher level of specialization within the classroom will provide students with a teacher that understands fully the intricacies of their particular needs. Within the special needs population, certain marginalized populations exist, such as those with poor health or from a different ethnic group than the dominant population. Education for these groups is often not even addressed using the current system (UNEXCO, 2007). The proposed system would allow schools to hire someone to…

Pages: 3  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 4


Self-Directed Learning Mentoring

Adult Education Adult Learning and Mentoring The problem is that adults are not intrinsically motivated. This has caused them a lack of success at the collegiate level. The purpose of this study is to determine whether a specific solution improves the adult success levels in postsecondary academia. The study will take approximately 24 months with some periods of low or…

Pages: 8  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4


Counselor Education Teaching Philosophy

¶ … Counselor Educator In many ways, counselors are educators. They take tools for communication and growth and attempt to teach those goals to a diverse group of people in settings that are designed to increase dialogue and communication in an effort to enhance problem-solving. Therefore, for the counselor, dialogue is essential; the counselor has to learn from the client…

Pages: 7  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 7


Mathematics My Role as a Special Education

Mathematics My role as a Special Education Teacher Despite the fact that education is not referenced in the U.S. Constitution, nations that declared that they have "undertaken to provide" it ought to provide extended educational prospects fairly. Appropriate development securities are assured by the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments that are: No State shall make or enforce any law which shall…

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Teaching My Personal Objectives for

Gardner posited the viewpoint that intelligence is not simply something measured in terms of intelligence quotient, but that there are actually multiple distinct types of intelligences that are related to music, kinesthetic learning, linguistics, logic and others (Helding, 2009, 193). This theory implies that a teacher must simply identify the type of intelligence that is a student's strong point and leverage that to his or her advantage. Additionally, Callista Roy's theory of adaptation propounds the notion that people incorporate a variety of different mechanisms -- specifically those pertaining to society, psychology and biological processes -- to adapt to a constantly changing world (Moreno-Fergusson and Alvarado-Garcia, 2009, p. 63). This theory also implies that people can adapt to their surroundings and circumstances and learn (as well as teach) accordingly). HOW YOUR PHILOSOPHY SUPPORTS THE PROGRAM CURRICULUM My philosophy supports the program curriculum in a multitude of ways. On an extrneely basic level, my philosophy regarding leanring is applicable to the nursing curriculum. Even though most of the students who I will be working with will have some level of collegiate experience as a student, and perhaps even advaced degrees in nursing, they can still benefit for a pedagogue who can utilize differentiated instruction as needed to suit their individual needs. Moreover, my philosophy applies to nursing in that it is invaluable to provide the support of inspiration that the next generation of nurses will need to become suitable practitioners and, perhaps, suitable instructors themselves one day. Although this group of learners may already be extremely motivated, it is still necessary for me to provide the sort of inspiration that can foster lifelong learning for them -- not just for nursing, but for learning in general. Thus, my philosophy of learning supports the program curriculum in all of these ways. THE VALUE OF MY TEACHING ROLE TO THE PROGRAM, THE INSTITUTION, AND THE NURSING PROFESSION I believe that if implemented properly and if I am able to obtain my goals as an instructor, the value of my teaching role to the program, the institution and the nursing profession as a whole is immeasurable. I am attempting to curate the next generation of nursing professionals at a high level of education to effectively take this occupation further. My job is to teach them how to learn about nursing as a whole. Doing so will require a lifelong process of erudition and practice, in…

Pages: 3  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 6


Teaching as a Career

Education -- Teaching Observations and Interview Classroom Observation This project included an observational component in which the researcher observed a 7th Grade classroom in Earth Sciences. To minimize any potential influence on student behavior associated with students' awareness of an adult observer, the observation was conducted using a small one-way mirror installed for any circumstances where such observations were helpful. This particular learning module involved the measurement and study of environmental erosion. The first part of the class consisted of a narrative explanation by the proper setup and implementation of the experimental materials. That narrative included suggestions for methodologically valid formulation of empirically testable hypotheses. Following the narrative explanations, the students assembled into pre-assigned groups after consulting the chart on the wall that the teacher referenced in part of her instructional lecture. The researcher noted the attentiveness to task demonstrated by almost every student and made a notation to inquire into how the teacher achieved that objective. Likewise, the researcher also noticed that the groups worked to solve apparent problems with the proper setup of experimental procedures. The researcher was particularly impressed by the apparent accuracy of the various simulated natural erosion processes that were evident from her vantage point directly behind two groups of students. The learning module concluded with a post-experiment review in which spokespeople from all the groups presented their groups' findings to the class and responded to questions from the teacher. Teacher Interview The second component of this project consisted of an interview of the teacher whose classroom module was observed in the first phase of the project. That interview began with an inquiry into the attentiveness……

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Steps to Improve Inclusion Especially for Profoundly Retarded Students

¶ … school inclusion with the goal of showing how an inclusion program, when implemented and understood correctly, can work to benefit all students involved, both special and regular education. This paper is aimed at a New York City middle school where the student population is comprised of both general and special education students, including profoundly retarded and autistic students.…

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Amount of Time Special Education Teachers Use

Special Education Teachers & Their Investment of Time The demands on a teacher of special education students have grown exponentially over the last few years. The increase in duties and responsibilities that special education teachers have been burdened with -- taking more and more of their time prior to and after class time -- may be among the pivotal reasons there is a crisis in this component of education. For example, an article in the journal Education (Plash, et al., 2006) reports that "special education teachers are more vulnerable to stress or professional burnout" than professionals in human service positions. Moreover, the study alluded to in this article -- conducted in Baldwin County, Alabama -- reflects that the biggest reasons for burnout and for switching to general education position among special education teachers are: "increased caseload"; "demands of IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) compliance"; bigger class sizes; job conditions; and "occupational stress." By the year 2010, the article asserts, there will be a need for 611,550 special ed teachers in the U.S.; but the fact is that each year around 13.2% of special ed teachers leave their positions. Six percent of those leave the special ed field completely, while 7.2% switch to general ed. The survey conducted for this research concluded that "role conflict, role ambiguity, perceived workload, and perceived principal support" lead to emotional and physical exhaustion. An article in the journal the Clearing House (Thornton, et al. 2007), points to additional research on the pressures special education teachers experience. Why are so many special education teachers leaving the field? Employment issues (the fact that there is better pay elsewhere in the teaching field) are pertinent to this question, but working conditions are listed as the second-most crucial issue. To wit, special education teachers are burdened with: increasingly complicated job assignments; bigger class loads, job stress, paperwork, lack of empowerment and a school "climate" that is not necessarily conducive to rapport with kids who have special needs. On top of those problems, special education teachers face a "lack of collegial, principal, and district support," the article explains. All special education students must have an Individualized Education Program (IEP), which takes a lot of time for the teacher. According to the San Diego Unified School District's Web site (http://www.sandi.net/depts/specialed/iep.htm), the IEP (which is mandated by the IDEA at……

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Education Divergent Learning Style Summary

d.). It is possible that male and female learning guides and partialities differ. The discrepancy almost certainly has biological, cultural, and environmental origins. There is in addition of course, great diversity among both male and female populations in regard to learning. Nevertheless, it is probably counterproductive to take for granted that gender is an immaterial issue in what people learn and how they learn. Culture has a significant manner on how people learn. While it is obviously not the case that all people of a given society learn in comparable manners, it is the instance that learning environments and measures that are at ease for several people of one cultural group may not be so to a lot of people of other cultural groups. Children in classrooms that are cultural oddities frequently do badly in school. In classrooms where diverse cultural groups are characterized, a single advance to teaching and learning is improbable to serve all children well (Differentiated Instruction, n.d.). 3. How do I see my divergent learning style affecting my educational design? It is very important that each child be taught in a way that they can best learn. Designing an educational curriculum that is tailored to a particular learner is the best way to make sure that that child is successful. This would be a way in which I can see that the divergent learning style will aid me in my educational design. Determining the best way that a student learns and tailoring the material to their learning style will help that particular child to be the best learner that they can be. This will give the best chance of being successful both in school and out. References Differentiated Instruction. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://webhost.bridgew.edu/kdobush/Strategies%20for%20Teaching%20Reading/Handbo ok/Diff_Inst/Differentiated%20Instruction.htm Savoie, Olivia. (2011). Convergent Learning Style vs. Divergent Learning Style. Retrieved from http://www.ehow.com/way_5635221_convergent-vs_-divergent-learning-style.html…

Pages: 2  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Lesson Planning

Education - Teaching Methods/Lesson Plans Education - Teaching Methods Lesson Planning The purpose of this work is to demonstrate an understanding of good practice in teaching and planning based on the following six points within the UK's educational system: (1) an awareness of the principles of good lesson planning (2) Identifying and addressing misconceptions that pupils may have in understanding math (3) Planning for differentiation (4) Progression from Key Stage 3 (5) Assessment (6) the contribution of ICT (Information, Communication, Technology) In the most recent publication of the Key Stage 3 National strategy 2004-05 (DfES 9122-3005 G) expands on these goals and then "shows how the strategy links with the principles of school improvement and the actions that school leaders should undertake to promote improvement." The number of terms in the school year The number of teaching hours in the week The number of days in a timetable cycle Lesson length The time allocated to each subject' Pupil groupings - whether pupils should be grouped in particular ways for any subject, for example, by ability or by gender Transition support - whether to offer a summer school and how best to organize a catch-up programme. Curriculum Inclusion and the distribution of the curriculum across the key stage. Curriculum inclusion and differentiation; and continuity and progression. Schools have great freedom and autonomy in the timetabling of curriculum. Booster classes for Year 9 - if, when and how they will take place Key Stage 3 is said to build upon the achievements of students age 11 at Key stage 2 and the firm ofundation that are delivered through the design of the National Literacy and Numeracy Strategies. Further the KS3 National Strategy is key to the achievement of objectives with broader scope and at secondary levels. The test given in Key Stage 3 in English, Mathematics and Science underwent some changes during the year of 2003. Principles in Lesson Planning and Awareness For the 2005-year the building on strategy training initiative and material were for the purpose of increasing the rates of progress among students as well as studying how the "core subject departments can enable more pupils to progress two levels across the key stage. In order for formative assessment to occur it is critical that students have a good notion of the intentions of learning for each lesson. The Learning Intention is that which students should know or understand upon…

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Individual Growth in This Particular Portfolio, We

¶ … individual growth in this particular portfolio, we should first of all briefly refer to a general outline of a teaching portfolio, as this may provide important backup information and may come to show some trends and pointers for the portfolio and teaching methodologies we are referring to. According to several sources, a reaching portfolio relies greatly on four…

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Personal Challenges Early on in My Educational

¶ … Personal Challenges Early on in my educational career, I have diligently taken measures that would ensure that I am constantly exposed to complicated yet challenging activities and endeavors. One of the hardest and bravest decisions I ever made was to transfer from Los Angeles to San Francisco during 11th and 12th grade, in order to get a better education. Upon my transfer, I sought to challenge myself and test my limits in studying by enrolling in AP and honor classes. For my AP class, I engaged in Calculus, Chemistry, Environmental Science, while in Honors class, I was involved Pre-Calculus. I am proud to say that my enrollment in these classes equipped me with the proper knowledge and skills to pursue a better and more advanced education centered on the sciences. In addition to taking AP and Honors classes, I was given the opportunity to get involved with and experience college life during a summer session program at University of California Berkeley. This experience enabled me to know more about and be prepared for college life. Apart from improving myself academically, I also joined clubs and engaged in activities that enhanced my leadership skills in various fields of study, such as the arts (film, jazz, and yearbook clubs) and sciences (environmental science). One of the most important qualities and experience I had the privilege to have is my ability to generate understanding and properly handling cultural diversity. Being an international student allowed me to know other people from different cultures and societies, thereby widening my experience in interacting with other people, especially those who are just starting to immerse themselves in American society. Thus, as an educational institution known for its focus and receptivity to cultural diversity, University of California Berkeley is, for me, the right place where I can contribute to the improvement of understanding cultural diversity as well as developing a "global state of mind." On a more personal level, my skills in communicating and relating effectively with other people and being passionate and responsible in the tasks and activities I am assigned to do are talents that will enable me to accomplish my objective of being actively involved in socio-civic endeavors while at the same time, pursuing an education centered on the sciences. Communicating effectively with other people is an essential requirement when relating to other people, necessary in making people interested and educated in my…

Pages: 3  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Bitter Milk

Bitter Milk Grumet, Madeline. (1988). Bitter Milk. University of Massachusetts Press. % of all the nation's teachers are female: so why have women's values had relatively little impact upon shaping the professional values and ethos of pedagogy? This is the central question asked by Madeline Grumet in her 1988 book Bitter Milk, which offers a feminist and feminine-centric view of the teaching process. Over the course of Grumet's work, which is half-memoir, one-quarter theory, and one-quarter history, Grumet advocates a non-patriarchal form of teaching. Unlike some teachers, who resist the characterization of teaching as 'women's work,' Grumet embraces it. Rather than separate women's nurturing and reproductive qualities from their roles as teachers, Grumet advocates linking a teacher's status as a mother or potential mother with her role as an educator. Grumet does not state outright that women must be mothers to be teachers, but she does suggest that the feminine experience has a unique perspective to offer children in the classroom. When children receive such a woman-centric perspective, in contrast to the male perspective they receive in the rest of their cultural lives, teaching can become a truly radical political act, rather than to merely serve the values of patriarchy. The status of teaching as underpaid 'women's work' is a historical development, not a natural state of affairs: in the 19th century, young boys of the elite received the benefits of the teaching of a schoolmaster, and even taking into consideration rural schools and the teachers of the very young, in 1840 women only made up 60% of the teachers in the U.S. With the decline in professional status for teachers came an upsurge in female teachers: expanded access to public education and the need to educate the swelling ranks of immigrants caused many young women to be drafted into the profession. Public education and the education of the very young lacked the prestige of higher learning, and hence teaching became largely women's work. Although women were not supposed to enter the ranks of the professional classes, teaching was usually presented as a kind of half-way step between girlhood and marriage. By 1910 more than 80% of American teachers were female, very often women fleeing the ranks of motherhood to seek some sort of independence (Grumet 1988, p. 43). But women, as mothers and teachers, have contributed their biological and metaphorical labor to institutions that have fostered female subordination. Essentially,…

Pages: 4  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 3

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