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Media Violence What Impact Does

All three in the context which they were presented are believable and I agree with them. Disagreement with two statements: a) "movies were helping shape a race of criminals" (Timmer, 2011) (this is patently absurd); and b) "…the only firm conclusion to be drawn, then, is that it is premature to draw any conclusions" (this is false because obvious conclusions can be and are being drawn vis-a-vis children imitating aggression and learning aggression (Weaver, 2011). Two ways police, prosecuting attorneys and judges should address this issue: a) law enforcement should collaborate with schools to involve parents in selective strategies for what their children watch; b) children who are aggressive in elementary school (due to video game obsessions) should be given tours of prisons to show them their potential future if they continue to behave in response to violence in media. In conclusion, as stated in the thesis, ultimately parents are responsible for what their children watch in the media. There can no longer be any doubt -- thanks to the empirical literature -- that viewing violent media has negative impacts on children. And while the Motion Picture Production Code amounted to what we would call censorship today, it was an early attempt to shield children from media violence. In summation, the young men who killed their classmates at Columbine High School in Colorado -- and other mass killers -- are known to have been addicted to violent video games. Hence, without parental guidance, society can expect more of these heinous criminal acts on innocents. Works Cited Anderson, Craig A., Berkowitz, Leonard, Donnerstein, Edward, Husemann, Rowell L., Johnson, James D., Linz, Daniel, Malamuth, Neil M., and Wartella, Ellen. (2003). The Influence of Media Violence on Youth. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 4(3), 81-106. Gentile, Douglas W., Mathieson, Lindsay C., and Crick, Nicki R. (2010). Media Violence Associations with the Form and Function of Aggression among Elementary School Children. Social Development, 20(2), 213-232. Gentile, Douglas A., Coyne, Sarah, and Walsh, David A. (2011). Media Violence, Physical Aggression, and Relational Aggression in School Age Children: A Short-Term Longitudinal Study. Aggressive Behavior, 37(2). 193-206. Timmer, Joel.……

Pages: 5  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


Terminology Used in Film and Television Production

FILM & TV Terminology TERMINOLOGY USED in FILM & TELEVISION Film is more than the twentieth-century art. Don Delillo (b. 1926). Visual storytelling, whether in film or in television (TV), some argue, constitutes the hardest of all the art forms. "In the making of a movie, between the idea and the finished print so much can go wrong and often…

Pages: 25  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


What Was Wrong in Catwoman the Movie?

¶ … wrong in Catwoman: The Movie It is quite rightly said that results are assessed not by the effort one puts into a venture, but the results it produces. Cutting across industries, the ultimate test of any marketing venture, be it movie making, it is acceptability by the target customers, the audience in this case study who is the…

Pages: 10  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Film Analysis of the Film Wall-E Is

Film Analysis of the film Wall-E Wall-E is a sci-Fi film that shows displays a story of lonely robot that has been left on Earth in order to clean up the mess humanity's has made. Disney-Pixar's, Wall-e, through analyzation is a film that is capable of opening a lot of eyes to how human beings treat the environment and where…

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 7


Movie Industry in Downloading Movies

It is also clear that this technology creates challenges that the movie industry must face. The first challenge involves broadband and the movie industry's effort to adapt programs that were compatible with the broadband technology. We have also discovered that piracy is a major issue that must be reduced immediately if the movie industry wants to avoid problems similar to Napster's. Some within the industry have taken drastic steps to ensure that copyright laws are protected. We found that the industry suffers financially when people choose to pirate movies instead of purchasing them. The Motion Picture Association of America has pleaded with congress to pass a bill that deals with the issue of piracy and wants immediate action against file sharing websites. In addition, Internet Service Providers and entire nations have implemented strategies that help to curb the amount of bandwidth that an individual is allowed to use and the amount an individual pays for equipment. Finally, we found that movie downloads will have an economic impact on brick and mortar establishments such as Blockbuster. We discovered that Blockbuster has attempted to offset losses by creating programs that offer customers some of the same incentives as movie downloads. We concluded that in the long run Blockbuster would survive the threat of movie downloads through diversification. Bibliography Anderson, Diane. "Movie Sites get the Shaft." The Industry Standard. September 18, 2000. Avery, Simon. Movie Industry Takes Active Role in Fighting Piracy. The Associated Press. 07-22-2002 http://www.law.com/servlet/ContentServer?pagename=OpenMarket/Xcelerate/View&;c=LawArticle&cid=1024079022232&t=LawArticleTech Borland, John. "ISP download caps to slow swapping?." CNET News. November 26, 2002. http://news.com.com/2100-1023-975320.html Gyer, A. Shy, O. "Internet, Peer-to-Peer, and Intellectual Property in Markets for Digital Products."May 4, 2002 http://www.wiwi.hu-berlin.de/wt1/lectures/mikroseminar/freeware19.pdf Howard P., Jones, S., Rainie, L. "Days and Nights on the Internet: The Impact of a Diffusing Technology." American Behavioral Scientist. Volume 45. June 30,2001. MediaForce Announces Top Ten Pirated Movies for July; Pirates Using Internet to Grow Personal Bootlegged Movie Collections." PR Newswire. August 16, 2001. http://www.findarticles.com/cf_0/m4PRN/2001_August_16/77245310/p1/article.jhtml?term=Downloading+Movies+from+the+internet Now Playing at Your Local Internet Portal: Movies on the Internet." Broadcasting & Cable. June 12, 2000. http://www.findarticles.com/cf_0/m0BCA/25_130/63191785/p1/article.jhtml?term=Downloading+Movies+from+the+internet Orenstein, Susan. "Blockbuster's Long, Long Run." The Industry Standard. April 16, 2001. http://www.findarticles.com/cf_0/m0HWW/15_4/74407398/p1/article.jhtml?term=downloading+movies Shapiro, C. And H. Varian. Information Rules. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Business School Press. 1999 Skopelja, Melissa. "Campus Internet Cluttered. The Ball State Daily News. March 20, 2003. http://www.bsudailynews.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2003/03/20/3e79586cc2885 Sporich, Brett. "The Internet Threat." Video Store. October 10, 1999. Sprenger, Polly. "Germany's Answer to Napster: A Hardware…

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Horror Final During the Second Have of

Horror Final During the second have of the course, we watched films that reinforced my previous perceptions of horror, films that redefined my definition of horror, and films that demonstrated the universality of horror. Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) further reinforced what Freud proposed in Das Unheimliche through the concept of doppelgangers. In the film, individuals are slowly being…

Pages: 5  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Crime Film

Crime Films, Stereotyping and Xenophobic Characters The two motion pictures called "Scarface" that are critiqued in this paper certainly have the same title and embrace the same themes of power, arrogance, gruesome bloodshed and gangster corruption. But when it comes to the characters, settings, editing, dialogue, narrative logic, and sociological substance, the two films are as far apart as Miami…

Pages: 10  |  Thesis  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 5


Scarface Latin American Culture

Scarface- Latin American Culture Scarface (1932) film is an American gangster movie, written by Ben Hecht, directed by Richard Rosson and Howard Hawks, and produced by Howard Hughes. The film is founded on the 1929 novel written by Armitage Trail (White 30). The film stars Paul Muni as Antonio, Tony' Camonte. Brian de Palma remakes the film in 1983 in…

Pages: 14  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 14


Horror Interviews

Horror Dimitri is a fifteen-year-old boy whose parents moved to the United States four years ago from Russia. I selected Dimitri for this interview because he plays a lot of video games, and also watches a lot of film and television. I asked Dimitri how he defines "horror" and his answer was quite complex for someone his age. He did not know the German term das Unheimliche, but he gave me the Russian word, which is something like "Strashni." He explained to me that Russian culture likes to address the darkest themes in human consciousness, but that his parents find many of the movies he watches and the games he plays to be too disturbing. Dimitri says that the scariest things for him are the unknown, which does have some connection to the concept of Unheimliche. Dimitri said that he does not find his games to be scary even when they have rough imagery in them, and that he is not afraid of things like murderers. What is scary to Dimitri is dying without a sense of purpose in life. When asked about the types of mediated horror he is familiar with, he smiled and said, "the usual," as he pointed to some of his comic books and films that he had including slasher flicks. He seemed embarrassed to also have some of the mediated horror marketed to teenagers, claiming that his girlfriend liked it. He admitted that his favorite horror genre used to be zombies but now he liked the "vampire thing," because his girlfriend "turned him onto it." As far as real-life horror is concerned, Dimiti said, "Just read the news paper! This world is crazy!" For Dimitri, life is strange and the experience of horror and fear is endemic to the human experience. His fascination with mediated forms of horror highlights the psychological and sociological dimensions to fear, and showcase also the universality of this appreciation. Dimitri has a large degree of self-awareness related to his appreciation of horror, as when I asked if he thought it was a good thing, he said, "I don't know, but I do believe that life itself can be a lot more horrifying than the stories that I read or the films I watch. Those things are just entertainment; the real killings and terrorism, that stuff is real." Interview 2 Fan is a twenty-year-old college student from a Chinese background. She…

Pages: 3  |  Interview  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


American Creative Industries

American Creative industries - the Role of the American Film Industry in Globalization The buzz word of today seems to be crisis - media coverage of the economic crisis emerged within the United States and expanded throughout the entire world is intensive. The efforts made in order to reduce the effects of the financial challenges are tremendous. What is often…

Pages: 7  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: Harvard  |  Sources: 15


Innovation Star Wars -- the Birth of

Innovation Star Wars" -- the birth of the modern movie blockbuster and directorial control What do these words mean to you: "Long, long, ago, in a galaxy far, far away?" Where were you when you saw your first "Star Wars" film? Did you have a "Star Wars" lunchbox -- or pretend that a rolled up newspaper was a light-saber? "Star…

Pages: 5  |  Term Paper  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 3


Gangsters the Era of the Gangster Movies

Gangsters The era of the gangster movies began shortly after the era of organized crime in the United States first began. The outlaw, in one form or another, has always been a fascination of mainstream America, and this has been reflected in our popular culture. The dime store novels of the nineteenth century were, in some ways, the precursors to…

Pages: 30  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Desperate Passage Critical Review Ironically,

One of the more ironic conundrums of history is the manner in which the Donner experience has been told, retold, and elaborated on so much that it has become an archetype of frontier mythology. The story has been adapted to movies, television, books, novels, plays, documentaries, and even a Gary Larson cartoon. Varyingly, the survivors have been lauded and condemned for the decisions that were made, so much so that there had been little left of a more balanced account of the saga until recently[footnoteRef:1]. [1: See for instance: Hardesty, D. The Archeology of the Donner Party. Reno, NV: University of Nevada Press, 1997; King, J. Winter of Entrapment: A New Look at the Donner Party. New York: PD Meany, 1992; Stewart, G. Ordeal by Hunger: The Story of the Donner Party. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1936 and 1988; American Experience -- The Donner Party. PBS, 2007, Retrieved from: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/donner/; Trial of Tragedy: The Excavation of the Donner Party Site. Internet Archive FedFlix. 2004, Retrieved from: http://archive.org/details/gov.ntis.ava19387vnb1; and last but not least, "Looks Like the Donner Party Started Without Us," 1990 Far Side Cartoon by Gary Larson, Retrieved from: http://seabendy.blogspot.com/2008_04_01_archive.html] Over the past two decades, however, research on the Donner Experience has shifted to a socio-cultural historiography and archaeological bent. The result has been works like Desperate Passage, in which journalist Ethan Rarick turns from sensationalism and a focus on cannibalism to a story about the tragedy of humanity and the hopes and dreams of a party of eager, but naive, pioneer explorers. Indeed, Rarick does not really focus on the Donners, but finds the epitome of the travels in one James Reed,…

Pages: 2  |  Book Review  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 1


Why Ridley Scott's Gladiator Was a Success at the Box Office

¶ … Components of Ridley Scott's Gladiator Gladiator (2000) is a film directed by Ridley Scott, set in the 2nd century AD. While its genre is that of the grand historical epic drama, it is essentially driven by a revenge plot that pits the fallen-out-of-favor General Maximus against the patricidal/regicidal Emperor Commodus. The film is largely a work of fiction,…

Pages: 6  |  Essay  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 3


Nudity in Television Nudity Is

For example, everyone is aware of the family prime time and therefore it is not advisable to air shows with excessive nudity material during that time. Shows that have a lot of content that is sexual or shows nudity can be aired at night. Nudity -- A matter of personal choice We live in a free world; where there is freedom of action and speech. It should be noted here that no actress or model is forced by the director or the producer to do a nude scene. Even when CGI is made use of, it is made sure that it is a decision that has been taken by the consent of the actress. Therefore, there are some actresses who do have an issue with taking off their clothes on the sets as well as for their viewers. On the other hand, there are some actresses who believe that if they will pose or act nude, it will be an assault on their dignity. This is the main reason why nudity is considered to be a matter of personal choice by some analysts and the other believe that even though it is a matter of personal choice, the trend of Hollywood or television is encouraging the actress and models to indulge into nude roles. For example, the actress Kate Winslet has the skill and the intelligence to turn a film into an absolute by blockbuster. She has appeared naked in both of her most popular movies; Titanic and Quills. When the directors asked her to reveal her breasts in Titanic she agreed because she believed that it would be important to add this aspect into the movie (Gish, 2010). On the other hand, there are some actresses who believe that they might not want their nude pictures to stay on the internet forever, just for the sake of the paycheck that they would receive after doing a nude shoot. Moreover, they also reckon that their family and their children might get upset over the fact their mother agreed to do a nude shoot. These are some of the things along with conservative and religious notions that keep some actresses from doing nude shoots (Lowry, 2013). Conclusion It is evident from the above discussion that the trends in the entertainment industry have changed and nudity has become rather common in the television shows and movies. The ethical dilemma that is raised…

Pages: 7  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


TV Movies Producers

Television & Movies Made-for-Television Movies The purpose of this essay is to discuss made-for-television movies and the impact they have had - or not had - on the cinema and home-viewing market. The role of the producer will be examined, and the differences between theatrical release producing and television producing will be discussed. Furthermore, the success of the telemovie on…

Pages: 5  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Development of Genres in Film

¶ … Film The early years of documentaries The documentary genre was initially created with the purpose of providing people with trivial information and it gradually came to discuss more complex topics as society discovered its ability to serve as educational material. Mainly depending on societal trends, people directed their attention at making documentary motion pictures focused on particular concepts. Ranging from wanting to indoctrinate the masses to wanting to present them with the latest fashion, documentary films were bombarding society with information that could be sent through a new and interactive medium. Motion pictures like Workers Leaving the Factory produced a strong effect on viewers and made it possible for people to realize that this particular genre was especially important in having them learn more regarding society. It all started with short recordings showing various scenes such as "everyday life, circus and vaudeville acts, and skits" (Ellis & McLane). As people started to express lesser interest in films that were not particularly impressive and that were initially appreciated because of the novelty regarding the moving photographic image started to be presented with actualities. They were referred to as actualities for the largest part of the early twentieth century and gradually started to be identified as documentaries as they occupied a larger market position. Individuals appeared to be most interested in seeing actualities that presented foreign concepts. The Lumiere organization traveled across France to shoot diverse scenes believed to express feelings that were exclusively French. People across the world could see motion pictures showing things like the Eiffel Tower and the Champs Elysees. Similarly, individuals in France were presented with films displaying Spanish and Russian cultural values. The whole world appeared to enjoy seeing documentaries because of the information that it received through this informational means. Actualities were very rare during the early twentieth century and this influenced viewers in expressing increased interest in seeing them. As previously specified, the masses were particularly impressed as a result of seeing documentaries showing foreign and exotic concepts. This is reflected by the effect that Robert Flaherty's Nanook of the North had on publics across the world. His film presented scenes that were never before seen by the masses and this made it difficult for individuals to refrain from expressing admiration in regard to the general aspect of the motion picture. "He shot his footage in 1920, when there were no rules for…

Pages: 3  |  Film Review  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Movie Response: We Were Soldiers

¶ … Soldiers Was the Movie Accurate? What Inaccuracies can be Identified? There is a good deal of the literature that praises this movie for it's authenticity, which is impressive because many war movies -- particularly those about the Vietnam conflict -- tend to be made for entertainment purposes -- not exact portrayal of historic reality -- by Hollywood. Movies made in Hollywood are not obliged to be totally accurate; what movie directors and producers want is a successful film at the box office, not necessarily a film that captures the honest reality of a war scene. However, if directors can reach a reasonably accurate portrayal of the actual events that are being depicted, they can boast that they went the extra mile to approach the truth of what happened. This film follows the book, We Were Soldiers Once…and Young, fairly closely. The book should be accurate given that it was co-authored by men that were present at the Battle of the Ia Drang Valley in Vietnam -- Lt. Gen. Harold G. Moore (Retired) and war journalist Joseph L. Galloway. But there are gaps in the film vis-a-vis the truthfulness of accuracy of that bloody battle. This paper points to the literature / critiques in response to the film. Laura Freschi writing in Military.com explains that the book is "…packed full of small authentic details that neither advance the plot nor add to character development," but were put into the narrative because they reflected the "random and seemingly meaningless mess" that life can become in a war zone (Freschi, 2003, p. 2). Of course the director Randall Wallace wanted to "streamline and simplify" those small but authentic details so he did, which gave the film a more "weighty, dramatic significance," Freschi explains (p. 2). One example of director Wallace's streamlining came when he asked actor Sam Elliott (playing hard-core Sergeant Major Plumley) to carry two .45 caliber pistols into battle. But Elliott balked because since he had become friends with the real Plumley, Plumley told Elliott he never carried more than one pistol. Hence, the film stayed true to that detail. Moreover, when General Moore and journalist Calloway saw the film, they felt that it was accurate "…especially in portraying the noise and confusion" in battlefield scenes (Freschi, p. 2). Another realistic aspect to the film is the fact that during the early portion of the Vietnam conflict so many…

Pages: 3  |  Movie Review  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 1


Film the Inside Job

the 2010 documentary film Inside Job directed by Charles Ferguson and narrated by American actor Matt Damon was considered one of the most interesting and appreciated documentaries of the year and was awarded the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature in 2011. It is "an angry, well-argued documentary about how the American financial industry set out deliberately to defraud the…

Pages: 5  |  Film Review  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


Impact of TV and Film

TV and Film Impact As technology and sheer presence of television and film grew in the 1970's, 1980's and 1990's, their ability to reflect and influence American culture also increased. The tumultuous 1970's and that decade's rise of political issues and fortunes were reflected in both television and film. The Reagan conservatism of the 1980's was significantly aided by Reagan's familiarity with both television and film. The domination of television and film by "The Big Six" in the 1990's deepened and broadened the abilities of television and film to reflect and influence culture in America and worldwide. Consequently, those 3 decades saw the dramatic increase in the importance of television and film. Body: In What Ways Were TV and Film a Window into the Culture of the 1970's, 1980's and 1990's? Television and film of the 1970's, 1980's and 1990's increasingly reflected and impacted revolutions of varying influence in America's culture, both feeding and feeding off of American culture and contributing to the rise and fall of political leaders and movements. America's 1970's was an explosive media decade, preoccupied with such weighty topics as the political unrest caused by the Vietnam War and Watergate, women's rights, racial segregation and the opening of popular culture to black citizens, increased political interest and cynicism, a more open sexual culture, and a new irreverence toward "classic" American values. The Vietnam War was the first televised war, with nightly news segments devoted to its progress,[footnoteRef:1] and Watergate became an increasingly hot topic of interest leading up to Nixon's resignation and the eventual rise of Jimmy Carter, a liberal outsider who rose to the Presidency in 1976.[footnoteRef:2] Predictably, there were also backlashes against critical exposure of powerful American individuals, with Nixon's order of an FBI……

Pages: 2  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


The 2005 Film, "The Upside of Anger,"

The 2005 film, "The Upside of Anger," is written and directed by Mike Binder, and stars Kevin Costner and Joan Allen. It also stars Alicia Witt, Keri Russell, Erika Christensen, and Evan Rachel Wood as Allen's four daughters, as well as Binder, who plays Costner's radio producer and eventual lover of Allen's daughter, Andy, played by Christensen. Critic Roger Moore writes for Knight-Ridder Tribune News Service, that this movie is along the genre of "Terms of Endearment," in that you have a strong willed woman who allows her anger and at times, alcohol, to cloud her perception concerning her intimate relationships (Moore pp). Thus, the movie title, "The Upside of Anger," is an appropriate title for this flick since the entire movie is centralized on Allen's character, Terry Wolfmeyer, and how she copes with what fate has dumped in her lap. The movie begins at a funeral on a rainy day, as the youngest daughter, Popeye, played by Wood, narrates that her mother used to be regarded as the kindest and sweetest person in the world, but now she's just a "very sad and bitter woman," and that her persona makes Popeye "just want to slap her" (Upside pp). The movie then flashes back three years and shows Allen dressed in her gown and robe, drink in hand, watching the Afghanistan invasion on television (Upside pp). This scene sets the tone of Allen's character, as it confirms Popeye's narrative, for just the look on Terry's face and her entire demeanor screams that this is not only an unhappy woman, but an angry woman (Upside pp). Terry's fixation of the television is disturbed when Denny Davies, played by Costner, knocks on the back door, beer in hand (Upside pp). She confesses that her husband has deserted her and the girls for his Swedish secretary, hence her anger (Upside pp). Costner is an ex-baseball……

Pages: 2  |  Movie Review  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Film Analysis of Double Indemnity

Film Analysis of Double Indemnity "From the moment they met, it was murder!" This is the legendary tag line for Billy Wilder's most incisive film noir, Double Indemnity, even though in 1944, when it was first released in New York on September 11, critics called it a melodrama, an elongated dose of premeditated suspense," "with a pragmatism evocative of earlier…

Pages: 9  |  Term Paper  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 15


Film "CAPOTE"(2005 Directed by Bennett Miller) Faithfully

¶ … film "Capote"(2005 Directed by Bennett Miller) faithfully represent the historical event? Does the movie If one is looking for the truth, it is best to avoid movies. Such a statement particularly applies to Hollywood, major motion pictures. Documentaries, made at the independent level without mainstream actors, huge budgets, and aspirations to make millions of dollars and win awards…

Pages: 6  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


Film Review of Mystic River Direct by Clint Eastwood

¶ … Mystic River Through decades of roles in television and film, Clint Eastwood established himself first as a strong actor, then as an acting icon, such as "Dirty Harry." He later continued his film career by moving into directing. Since becoming a director, he has made several high grossing and critically acclaimed films that challenge the viewers as much as they challenge the actors within the film. One of his films, upon which the paper will focus, is Mystic River, which was released a decade ago, in 2003. This is a film in which Eastwood served as director, producer, and film scorer; therefore, he was heavily dedicated and involved in the film because he occupied multiple key roles. The film has quite an all star cast, including the lead actors who are Sean Penn, Tim Robbins, and Kevin Bacon, among others who have solid careers and reputations. Jimmy, Sean, and Dave have a friendship that extends back into their early teenage/late childhood years. They grew up in a working class area of Boston in the 1970s. One day, while playing hockey, the friends come across some wet cement and decide to write their names into it. Two men, pretending to be police officers, approach the boys and hassle them to the point where they take Dave into "custody" and put him into their car. The men, of course, are not real police officers, but men who harbor, torture, and sexually abuse Dave for a few days. Dave eventually escapes, but the experience plagues him and haunts him decades later. Moving forward into the present, where the majority of the film takes place, the men who were once friends are now estranged, though still live within relative proximity to each other. Jimmy is kind of a neighborhood thug leader, with very close ties to the community he cares about so much. Sean has become a police detective, and Dave is a working class man who does construction type work. Each man is suffering from his own personal problems and dramas. Though they are estranged, they become drawn together again after Jimmy's daughter Katie is brutally, suddenly, and mysteriously murdered. Jimmy takes it upon himself to conduct an off the grid, street-justice type of investigation into his daughter death, while Sean conducts an on the books, formal police……

Pages: 3  |  Film Review  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Hollywood Movies the Main Aim of This

¶ … Hollywood Movies The main aim of this research was to see whether Hollywood movies have an impact on the girls living in the Saudi Diaspora in Paris, France. We also wanted to see how these movies affected the sense of national identity that these girls had. We randomly selected two girls from the Saudi Diaspora and interviewed them…

Pages: 13  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 10


Nationalism in Movies Film as a Form

Nationalism in Movies Film as a form of cultural expression-." The modern film is a genre of its own that expresses a huge variety of cultural experiences through a fluid continuum. Film expresses the entire gamut of human emotions and needs; from the tragic to the comic; from entertainment to education; from adult to the young child. Films have become…

Pages: 4  |  Movie Review  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Film Frozen River

¶ … film Frozen River Courtney Hunt's 2008 motion picture Frozen River puts across a series of diverse messages, with audiences being required to either interpret it or take everything as granted, given that both of these options are likely to generate intense feelings. Melissa Leo is the protagonist-Ray Eddy- a woman caught between the harshness related to raising a…

Pages: 6  |  Film Review  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 1


Ten Commandments in Film Decalog (Decalogue in

¶ … Ten Commandments in Film Decalog (Decalogue in the U.S.) is a series of ten stories focusing on one of the Ten Commandments (Kieslowski, Krzysztof, 1989, motion picture film). Each of the ten stories is thought provoking, and a lot of work was put into the storyline and structures to keep them on a high concept level of filmmaking. The films are not going to appeal to everyone, because they are subtitles, but for those of who love foreign film, they're unforgettable experience and it becomes difficult not to compare them to the 1956 Cecil B. DeMille epic version, starring Charlton Heston, Ten Commandments (DeMille (dir), 1956 motion picture). While DeMille's epic was long before Kieslowski's ten story film collage, Both films cause the viewer to find that place inside their self where they keep their sense of faith, and, when it is challenged by the world around us, we draw upon it, like a well, to find meaning and understanding. Kieslowski's stories play……

Pages: 1  |  Film Review  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 0


Movie Review on to Kill a Mockingbird

¶ … Kill a Mockingbird Movie Review Movie Review: To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) The plot of to Kill a Mockingbird (dir Robert Mulligan, 1962, with Gregory Peck and Mary Badham) is seen through the eyes of Jean Louise "Scout" Finch, who is six years old when the story begins (in a small Alabama town in 1932) and eight or nine when it ends. Scout grows up that summer, and over the next two summers, in a starkly prejudiced, racially-divided small town environment, as her lawyer father defends a black man unjustly accused of a white woman's violent rape. Atticus Finch, Scout's father, is a man of integrity and principles. He is appointed to defend Tom Robinson, the black man unjustly accused, and does so to the very best of his ability in the face of enormous, continuous criticism. For this his children Jem (Scout's older brother) and Scout are followed home from a school event late one night by the accuser, Bob Euell, who viciously attacks them. Scout, protected by a stiff, bulky costume she wears (she has had to dress as a ham for the earlier school event) is only roughed up, but her brother Jem's arm is broken. It could have been far worse than that, though, for Jem. But instead Jem's life is saved by the mysterious recluse, Arthur "Boo" Radley, who afterward becomes the Finch family's friend. As a work of art, the 1962 black and white feature film to Kill a Mockingbird (dir Robert Mulligan, 1962, with Gregory peck and Mary Badham) based on Harper Lee's novel of that name published in 1960, is a blend of "realist" and "formalist" filmmaking. But it is also "realist" in the sense that, according to the actress who played Scout, Mary Badham ("Scout Remembers," 1997) those who cast the film took pains to locate children from the South without acting experience like herself, who as characters could make the film's main child characters, Scout, Jem, and Dill, seem optimally realistic within the movie's Deep South setting and milieu. To Kill a Mockingbird is formalist in its seamlessly non-self-conscious blending of plot; characterizations, setting, music, and iconography. In terms of the latter, the camera treatment of Jem's secret box filled with Boo Radley's possessions, examined in the opening shots slowly, carefully, almost as if physically caressed by the eye of the camera, is an obvious example of a…

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Film Audience and the Movie Capote

Capote The recent film Capote (2005, Bennett Miller) achieved a modest success by Hollywood standards but was never expected to do more than that given the subject matter and the divisions within the audience. The film was released by Sony Pictures Classics, a subdivision in the Sony system that is dedicated to releasing more difficult independent films, films that are…

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Japanese Film Ozu's Good Morning

Japanese Film: Ozu's 'Good Morning' Good Morning-Ohayo (Japanese) (Yasujiro Ozu, 1959) is focused on an event from Tokyo during the early 1950s. The action in the movie takes place in an environment that is apparently experience a "Westernization" process influencing people's thinking and their perception toward matters that had just entered their culture. It is difficult to determine whether the film is meant to criticize the fact that the Japanese society came to be shaped by the West or if it actually encouraged people in becoming more open-minded regarding influences coming in from the Occident. The motion picture is generally meant to put across an episode involving a Japanese suburban community as it struggles to maintain its cultural values as it gets constantly bombarded with new ideas. The first scenes in the film show Mrs. Hayashi as she is comes to be criticized by her neighbors because of her presumably vengeful attitude. Most of the action in the motion picture revolves around the two young boys of the Hayashi family. In spite of the fact that most individuals in the community has enough money for a TV set, most of them are reluctant to acquire one because they consider that it would be unconventional for them to do so. Children are less biased and less concerned about cultural values and are in point of fact attracted by their noncomformist neighbors. The fact that the wife in the eccentric family is a cabaret dancer only adds to the feeling that the Japanese society as portrayed in the film is yet unable to assimilate information and concepts coming into the country from the West. The two plots in the movie are interweaved at the point when the two boys refuse to say hello to their neighbors, making them feel that it is Mrs. Hayashi who is really responsible for the children's behavior. The film's plot is set in a community in Tokyo and it relates to a community that has trouble understanding Western concepts and that is generally inclined to reject ideas that it considered to be non-traditional. In……

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Special Education Movie Review

Disability in Society and Film Film Analysis and Summary -- Forrest Gump (Paramount, 1994) The film is about the protagonist, Forrest Gump, who was born physically disabled and also diagnosed with limited intelligence as a child. The film is told by the protagonist in retrospect, opening with him recounting his life to strangers at a bus stop in Savannah Georgia in 1981. His recollections begin with his experiences as a child struggling to overcome his physical disabilities in the form of his weak lower limbs that required cumbersome braces and exposed him to the ridiculing of other children. Forrest also relates that he was "special" in other ways and the actor portraying him, Tom Hanks, does a commendable job of creating a persona that is simultaneously charming, sympathetic, yet also possessing a spark of some sort that clearly shines through his disabilities. For example, despite something obviously slightly impaired about his cognition and mannerisms, Forrest exhibits a raw but simplistic intelligence or awareness that belies his formal diagnosis as intellectually slow. Critique of the Film 1. Emotional Response: Describe your emotional, intellectual and behavioral responses. For example, how did this movie make you feel or think? What did you want to do after viewing the film? It is impossible not to sympathize with and genuinely like the character of Forrest Gump. His character displayed a genuine warmth and a degree of straightforward honesty that, unfortunately, is relatively rare in non-disabled people. Something in Forrest's personality allowed him to retain a child's innocence and honesty throughout his life that, in most people, seems to pass into a less genuine personality of a mature adult who knows better what emotions, thoughts, and opinions to play closer to the vest than Forrest, whose every thought is fully expressed to others, even to complete strangers. In some ways, the film made me want to understand how I could become as comfortable expressing some of my thoughts more genuinely to others the way Forrest does without any ordinary fears that most adults fear about rejection or criticism from others. 2. Portrayal: Explain whether the person(s) with a disability was portrayed as ordinary people, as superhuman, or were they stereotyped. Initially, of course, the viewer perceives Forrest as an object of pity, especially as he recounts his childhood. There certainly is an element of pity, or at least compassion and empathy that the film generated in…

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Amistad Historical Movies Find Themselves in a

Amistad Historical movies find themselves in a precarious situation; they strive for historical accuracy while creating an entertaining film that viewers and critics will enjoy. In this regard, Amistad is no different from any other historical movie. It takes dramatic liberties for entertainment value in order for the audience (the American moviegoer) to be able to relate with the movie. These liberties are not necessarily detrimental, as they capture the emotions that the Africans must have felt throughout their ordeal. The beginning scenes abroad La Amistad displayed the horrors and brutality of the "Middle Passage" and the Atlantic Slave trade. However, there are other scenes in the film that sole purpose is to evoke an emotion from the viewer, such as Cinque's now famous line "Give us free." Another moment was John Quincy Adam and Cinque's interaction in the greenhouse. Cinque reacts to a West African flower which convinces Mr. Adams to defend their case in the Supreme Court. On the other hand, there are several anachronisms found throughout the movie. The movie's consistent hint or reference to a Civil war is a major anachronism of the movie. Throughout the movie ordinary citizens discuss the upcoming Civil War, an event that does not occur for another twenty years. Also, the movie depicts President Van Buren's feelings toward the case being influenced by his re-election campaign and trying to appease the South so he can garner votes. At the end of the movie, Van Buren loses his re-election campaign due to the freedom of the Amistad prisoners. This is a simplification of history. While the film has its fair share of accurate events, such as the mutiny abroad the ship, Spanish pressure to return the Africans to Spain, the actual trial in Connecticut and the Supreme Court, it fails in accurately portraying the importance of……

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Positives of the Movies Followed by a

¶ … positives of the movies followed by a candid examination of the weaknesses. The first positive element of the movie was the narration by Whoppi Goldberg. Whoppi is not one of my favorite artiste but I find her performance in this piece worthy of mention. Through her narration the movie is made fresher and more enjoyable, it is very much like adding a bit of lime juice to a dish it freshens it up a bit. Even though her voice is a bit raspy it complements the smooth journey through the various constellations quite well. It was as though the contrast between what she was saying and the moving images provided a natural connection. I however did not care for the use of the term "that's star power." My understanding of the intent is that it was supposed to be an ode to the movie; however I heard it as though it was an awful pun on Whoppi herself. That should really have found its place on the cutting room floor and not in the movie. An additional value of the movie is that it has broad appeal to multiple ages of individuals. The young persons who view it will be awed by the vivid colors and the engaging sound. The movie score is enthralling as you listen you are sucked into the movie. That is unfortunately offset by the limited depth of the work. This is possibly my greatest critique of the work while there is excellent color and lively sound you do not get much depth. The script appears to be written for persons with limited intellect or imagination. The movie focuses on different stars and the life cycle of these heavenly bodies. Where the entire plot falls apart is that the subject is given superficial treatment. This is annoying because you would believe that at a museum you should be treated to greater depth beyond a light show. The images while awe inspiring and captivating are given superficial treatment. The movie is like eye candy but does little for the brain. That is probably the weakest point of the experience. "Are we the only……

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Ethics of Film Production it

With that in mind, the message the film intends to put across might be perceived differently given the diverse backgrounds and beliefs of the film's audience. It should be noted that ethical responsibility in this case does not mean that the producer should censor his or her opinions and intentions. Instead, ethical responsibility means that the producer ought to take into consideration the diverse views, backgrounds as well as beliefs of the film's intended audience. Further, closely related to this is the influence the film has on the audience. Here, producers should keep in mind that by dint of producing films and documentaries with a large public audience, they happen to be in an advantaged position of influence from where they can shape, distort or even change the public perceptions of issues. Next, a film producer should also be aware of a number of legal issues which in one way or the other relate to the nature and conduct of his work. Legal issues are closely related to ethical issues. For instance, in this case, producers should ensure that their work does not defame an individual's character. Further, permission should always be sought when using the media production, creative work, ideas or even image of another individual. Seeking permission to utilize the works of others is not only a requirement of the law but it is also the right step to take from an ethical perspective. Other legal issues which also border on ethical considerations include the preservation of animal rights. For instance, any animal in the film should not be made to suffer unnecessarily. In most countries, cruelty to animals during filmmaking is illegal. More specifically, in relation to copyrights, it can be noted that the owner of a certain piece of work (i.e. music, video or idea) should and must indeed be consulted before utilizing any of his creations. As Roberts-Breslin notes, "in the U.S. And many other countries any work you use that was created by someone else can only be reproduced or excerpted with permission" (22). While it might in some instances seem like the most logical thing to do given resource and other constraints; using the work of someone else without their express nod is not only illegal but also unethical. Conclusion In conclusion, it can be noted that during the film production process, producers must be aware of the legal as well as ethical…

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Silent Film Era

Silent Film And Its Effect on the Imagination As Richard Abel observes, "The materiality of silent cinema…has become so unfamiliar to us, so different from that of our own cinema in the late twentieth century" that it is difficult to view silent film as anything but anachronistic (4). However, with 2011's the Artist -- an homage to silent film --…

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Sophie's Choice 1982

Film Analysis, Sophie's Choice Film Analysis: Sophie's Choice Sophie's Choice is one of the most compelling films of all time, a gripping drama that is not only a good film, but a great one with fantastic acting, a superb musical score, and fantastic cinematography, which work to place it among the ranks of the greatest American films of recent time.…

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Narrative Criticism to Kill a Mockingbird Movie Transcript

¶ … setting of this classic film is the deep South during the Great Depression. The story is told through the eyes of a young girl, named Scout, played in the movie by Mary Badham, whose father is a prominent lawyer in the small, fictitious Alabama town of Maycomb. The Depression has hit Maycomb hard but Scout's family, which consists…

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Movie Proposals. These Would Be

In order to make a proper choice among the four projects, we need to point out towards the fact that the company's mission, "must" and "want" objectives and financial criteria such as ROI also need to be rank. A movie performing well in the "want" objective cannot be picked out if it does not respect the "must" objectives or part of the company's mission. As such, "My Life with Dalai Lama" and "The Year of the Echo" have to be excluded from the very beginning. The first brings about political controversies which may risk a potential economic conflict with China, a conflict that will soon materialize in an interdiction to launch a theme park there. This will not come to terms with the company's short and medium termed plans. "The Year of the Echo," besides being intended as a documentary for a well-determined segment of consumers, has moral controversies and will never fulfil criteria such as low advisory content. This leaves a choice between "Heidi" and "Escape from Rio Japuni." Heidi has the disadvantage of having a large budget, which may implicate future financial problems for the company. We are not sure whether the company can support a financial burden of such dimensions. Besides good music, good actors and beautiful scenery, it really has nothing to show for. It is only a remake, with no additional creative substance. In this sense, the best candidate is "Escape from Rio Japuni." While being a moderate project, not aiming at high implications, it draws attention towards the problems in the environment and this has become part of the company's mission. It also has a very promising ROI and it can become a reference in the animated film category. Following this argumentation and the use of the rankings and criteria provided, "Escape from Rio Japuni" is the best choice……

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Fahrenheit 9/11 Documentary Film Fahrenheit 911 Was

Fahrenheit 9/11 Documentary Film Fahrenheit 911 was released on 24th June 2004. The film is directed and written by Michael Moore who is also part of the film producing team along with Jim Czarnecki and Kathleen Glynn. The cinematography was done by Mike Desjarlais and the music was done by Jeff Gibbs. This film was distributed by Lions Gate Film/IFC. (Berardinelli) The film had a running length of one hour fifty two minutes. Fahrenheit 9/11 made its debut in 2004 Cannes Film Festival where it received the greatest standing applause from the mass in the history of that festival and was awarded with the Golden Palm, which is the festivals highest award. Apart from United States and Canada, this film was released in 42 other countries. The film examines and analyzes George W. Bush then president of United States of America and his policies on war of terror and highlights role of media on war against terror. After the commencement of the movie, it is told that how George W. Bush and his political allies handled the voting controversy in Florida and how they combined to formulate this election fraud. (Berardinelli) Then the movie moves towards the 9/11 attack where it tries to inform the audience that President Bush was made aware of the first plane crash into the World Trade Centre while he was going to the school and then shortly after that the second plane collided with the World Trade Centre while the president was in the class after which he was informed again and told that United States of America was under attack but despite this the President continues to read the book for approximately for seven more minutes. The film points out that why 9/11 took place and what were the repercussions of this act. It points out Americas attack on Afghanistan and then attack on Iraq in the name of war on terror. Moore compares the situation in Iraq before it was attacked and after it was attacked. He tries to tell that people living in Iraq were relatively much happier before the American forces attacked them. Moore also points out that how the Bin Laden family who were in USA before Afghanistan was attacked was sent back on a secret flight one day before starting the war on terror. In this movie, Moore also blames that George W. Bush was responsible for bringing in…

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