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Media Review News Story -

Hence, propaganda model comes into play here. Bloomberg Business Week Bloomberg Business Week published a couple of abridged versions of the story on the issue, which also introduced the company by giving a short introduction. Look at the following short stories, published there followed by an analysis at the end: About the Company: Viking Air Limited has been working as…

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Parallels in Journalism Studies Culture

Sometimes though, in very heated and dangerous situation, journalists are one of the few groups of people who are allowed safe passage and access to dangerous or rare or amazing situations, places, people, and information. Journalism students and professionals should remember the history and the connection to democratic practices as part of their journalistic practice as well. Like other chapters discussed in the paper, McNair has a very strong sense and grasp of world history and how cultural shifts influence modes of expression and communication such as journalism and mass media. In chapter 21, Ward writes upon a very closely related topic to journalism and democracy, which is ethics in journalism. This is very serious issue that can confuse journalists and can have serious consequences or affects upon audiences, as journalism students who are abreast of world press may well know. Journalism is a profession where ethics are often in questions and if journalists lack ethics, certainly it is their choice, but that choice will have repercussions. Not only does the chapter discuss the notion of ethics and ethics in journalism, the chapter additionally explains the five stages in the development of ethics in journalism as well as four approaches to the study of ethics in journalism today. Thus, even if one is a new journalism student, one understands that the issue of ethics is not one to be taken lightly, and that there is vigorous research and guidance toward a standard of ethics or ethical code by which journalism professionals are expected follow or at least of which they should be aware. Finally, the focus of chapter 24 takes the themes and ideas expressed in the aforementioned chapters, and blows them up to the global scale as Cottle writes about journalism and globalization. Globalization is a movement that can be directly attributed to the advent of certain forms of digital technology including the Internet. There are very, very few industries and disciplines that have not been affected by either positively or negatively by processes of globalization. Now more than ever, journalism is an international field that garners a great deal more global exposure and attention than before things like the Internet. Cottle stresses the importance of cultural sensitivity and the roles of news media in the communication of culture and not just news. In many of the headings in this chapter, Cottle uses the word emissary to describe the…

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Racism in Media Television News

Having watched the advertisement, it appears as though the only thing missing from this advertisement was blackface. A second advertisement from the company is equally racist and depicts two -- apparently well-off business executives -- conversing in ebonics and imitating black mannerism, that is, until a black co-worker walks up and they immediately stop their behavior as though such comportment is something to be ashamed of (Minato). While advertising executives should realize before they release advertising campaigns that certain approaches are blatantly racist, it is only after public outcry is heard that these campaigns are stopped. Given the countless number of racist advertisements in existence, it is a wonder how it is possible that these advertisements got beyond the brainstorming phase of creation. As much as people may try to deny stereotypes in the media, the fact remains that Blacks are continuously negatively depicted in news broadcast reports and stories, as well as in the advertisements that fill the time between news reports. While there is no reason for such a divide between blacks and whites to exist in the media, given media history, the only time anything is ever done to stop discrimination in the media is when the public speaks out, however, it has also been demonstrated the public only speaks out when a matter concerns or impacts them personally. Works Cited Balkaran, Stephen. "Mass Media and Racism." The Yale Political Quarterly Vol. 21 No. 1 (October 1999). Web. 3 December 2012. Brown, Michael K. Whitewashing Race: The Myth of a Color-Blind Society. Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2003. GoogleBooks. 3 December 2012. Entman, Robert M. And Andrew Rojecki. The Black Image in the White Mind: Media and Race in America. Chicago: The University of Chicago……

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Presence of Media Bias in

To refer back to the first question asked, I would say that when considering and limiting the scope of the argument to local and national news in the United States broadcast on basic, non-cable channels, the answer is yes. These programs and stations are out of control with regard to displays and demonstrations of bias. I do not personally watch "regular" news that often because it is deeply depressing and staggering. Most of the stories are about horrific crimes and tragedies; often a series of these kinds of stories are shown in a row -- one after another of some terrible accident, horrendous crime, or lack of justice in the world. It is unbearable. Many stations cast white anchors as leads with limited ethnic cast members. Many stations give the male news casters the top stories or the most dangerous or cinematic stories. These are reflections of bias. Both the stories that are reported and the stories that go left unreported reflect bias as well. Any day of the week, an American can turn to their afternoon or evening local news and hear a report of a violent crime perpetrated by a minority. This does not mean only minorities commit violent crimes or that minorities comment a large quantity of violent crimes, but with the absence of counterstories or variations on that story, that is what the average, moderately literate viewer thinks. The bias of "regular" news sustains many kinds of stereotypes that have negative impacts on society. The media is biased; it has always been biased. The largest, wealthiest, and most powerful companies or individuals that own biased news programs consist of affluent, conservative white men. When there is more diversity at the top, the removal of bias or at least diversity of bias will trickle down. Objectivity is a fairly impossible state to achieve in general. At least programs and stations could be more open about their biases and acknowledge them as well as the biases of others. Then consumers can make more informed decisions about what news media they consume as well as make more informed choices about perceptions of others and the world. References: Giles, D. (2003) Media Psychology. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.: Mahway, NJ. Wahl-Jorgensen, K. & Hanitzsch, T. (eds) (2009) The Handbook of Journalism……

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Citizen Journalism, Tech, Advertising "If

Their conclusion is that the return falls short because there is too little in the outcome that is a promising and verifiable as expected (The Open Newsroom 6). FINANCIAL UNCERTAINTY: If support means something, citizen journalism has a future. Several sites are offering technical, legal and even broadcast incentives to encourage more people to be involved as citizen reporters (The Open Newsroom 7). CNN is widely recognized for this as it seeks to capture videos of local news and events. The issue of money and advertising, however, is much less certain. Some writers are beginning to expect to be paid something on the belief that their visibility on the Internet has some value, even if they are not writing for profit. The balance of this with the different purposes of the genre is not well understood yet but there still seems to be many opportunities for all types of innovations that could well cash-in on a well-established pattern of possibilities. REFERENCES Bandon, F. Citizen Journalism & Democracy in Africa: An exploratory study. HighwayAfrica.com. Open Society Foundation for Africa. 2010. Retrievable from http://www.highwayafrica.com/media/Citizen_Journalism_and_Democracy_Book.pdf. Bentley, C.H. Citizen Journalism: Back to the Future. Discussion Paper: Carnegie-Knight Conference on the Future of Journalism, Cambridge, MA. June 20-12, 2008. Retrievable from http://citizenjournalism.missouri.edu/researchpapers/bentley_cj_carnegie.pdf. Bruns, A. Citizen Journalism and Everyday Life: A case study of Germany's myHeimat.de. ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation Queensland University of Technology. 1-11. No date. Retrievable from http://www.highwayafrica.com. Hurst, N. Citizen Journalism vs. Legacy News: The battle for supremacy. Missouri School of Journalism. Columbia, MO. July 8, 2010. Web. Viewable at http://journalism.missouri.edu/2010/07/citizen-journalism-vs.-legacy-news-the-battle-for-news-supremacy/. The Open Newsroom. Citizen Journalism: A primer on the definition, risks and benefits and main debates in media communications research. 1-10. No date. Retrievable from http://www.theopennewsroom.com/documents/Citizen_%20journalism_phenomenon.pdf. WAN-IFRA. Study says: citizen journalism not yet a threat. World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers. Editor's Weblog. May 8, 2010. Web. Viewable at http://www.editorsweblog.org/2010/05/28/study-says-citizen-journalism-not-yet-a-threat.…

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New Media Implications the Improvement

Others view them as heroes that are fettering out the facts and figures that the established news media does not want others to see. Whether one views them as legitimate news makers or just part of the audience that is just stirring things up can vary, but this obviously is an example of the lines between audience and newsmakers blurring…

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Language of News Reporting

Language of News Reporting In the modern era most journalism analysts concentrate on the impact that the text and language used in an article has on overall results attained. For example, Blommeart in his study conducted in 1999 explains: "Texts generate their publics, publics generate their texts and the analysis of 'meanings' now has to take into account a historiography…

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Pulitzer Prize's Effect on Journalism

Pulitzer Joseph Pulitzer and his Eponymous Prize: The Shaping and Stature of Modern American Journalism Joseph Pulitzer is remembered variously as a pioneering voice and face in the newspaper industry and the field of journalism, and as a quasi-robber baron with more greed than conscience and a willing to sell principles if it meant selling papers. Neither view can be…

Pages: 13  |  Essay  |  Style: Chicago  |  Sources: 0


Growth of Mass Media in the United States

Growth of Mass Media in the United States How does the history of New York City predict the history of the development and growth of most of the mass media in the United States?" New York City is famously the city that never sleeps -- and its morning, afternoon, and evening newspapers were harbingers of the 24/7 connected media society we live in today. Early on in its history, due to the fact that so many immigrants chose to settle within its confines, every neighborhood of New York took on different character. Immigrants gravitated to areas where their native languages were spoken. These concentrated ethnic neighborhoods often produced community institutions such as newspapers written in the language of the neighborhood. This is reflected the segmentation of mass media today, where people who are conservative tune into Fox news, while liberal individuals read similarly-spirited blogs. Every ethnicity or nationality can find access to the media voices that speak the language of their culture on the World Wide Web. New York City's rapid industrialization and high population density made it the ideal location to launch yellow journalism, or highly inflammatory, populist journalistic style characteristic of the New York World, run by Joseph Pulitzer and the New York Journal, run by William Randolph Hearst, both of which began in the 19th century ("Yellow Journalism, Think Quest, 2007). New York's relatively small environment also enabled an intimate relationship with politicians and celebrities alike. What the mayor of New York……

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Media: An Exercise in Sensationalism

This results in a narrow perspective and limits the information available to consumers about important issues in the world. The pursuit of profits and increasing mergers between news companies has resulted in inadequate media coverage. According to Croteau and Hoynes (2001) increasingly news media agents are pursuing profits by working together, but the result is an edging out of ideas and discussion of topics and subjects that might be more valuable to the public than sensationalism. News divisions in recent years are merely the product of capitalist society, having become "just another profit center for conglomerate parents" that are required to yield profit ratios (Champlin & Knoedler, 2002). A trend toward media "concentration" is also occurring where most of the mass media in the country is dominated by a few large corporations including AOL-Time Warner, Disney (ABC), Viacom (CBS) and NewsCorp (Fox News Channel) (Champlin & Knoedler, 2002). Because the power of coverage is limited to a few big mega corporations, (such as AOL Time Warner which regulates CNN), the content more and more is becoming shaped by advertisers and other agents looking to boost profits rather than really offer the public a fair portrait of the news. News for profit requires that ratings be obtained (Champlin & Knoedler, 2002) thus the quality of news has decreased and the entertainment and sensationalist aspects of news coverage have increased significantly in recent years. The news media has failed consumers in many ways, primarily by focusing on sensationalist tactics geared toward increasing profits rather than providing objective and well rounded coverage of important world events. The power of news media is controlled by a few large corporations that are concerned with making profits and improving ratings rather than supplying the public with the best possible coverage. A majority of news coverage is either very limited in nature or biased. News reporters aren't focused on reporting and analyzing from many different perspectives. Rather, only the most dramatic tales are offered in the media, and when they are concentrated on to improve ratings rather than inform and educate the public. Much of the news can be considered simply an agent for entertainment rather than a journalistic venue. The duty of the news media is to report on an event and subsequently analyze it from many different perspectives. Unfortunately this is not happening and consumers are suffering as a result. References: Baker, William F., and…

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Ethnic/Race in the News Media

But all agree that there is room for improvement." (Rifkin) This is undoubtedly the case. The way in which ethnic and racial issues are covered by the media is skewed. The news media, as well as the entertainment aspects of the media, have an agenda to get ratings. This means that morality and social justice are often curbed in order to bring in the most money. "News gathering, to be sure, is a highly imperfect art, and problems with basic facts, not to mention nuances, are common. But when you are talking about conflicts that are at their root racial, ethnic or religious, the stakes are higher. This is the stuff riots, wars and deep-seated prejudices are made of, and the news media has an even greater responsibility than it normally does to get it right." (Rifkin) Since 9/11 and the introduction of the so-called War on Terror, it is even more dangerous that the media continues to fling racial and ethnic issues around carelessly. Bibliography AAR. "History of AAR." Artists Against Racism. http://www.vrx.net/aar/history.html Creeley, Will and Rendall, Steve. "White Noise: Voices of Color Scarce on Public Radio." Extra! September/October 2002. Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting. http://www.fair.org/extra/0209/white-noise.html Douglas, Susan. Listening In: Radio and American Imagination. New York: Times Books, 1999. Ely, Melvin Patrick. The Adventures of Amos 'N' Andy: A Social History of an American Phenomenon. New York: The Free Press, 1991. Entman, Robert and Rojecki, Andrew. The Black Image in the White Mind: Media and Race in America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000. Gilliam, Frank. "The Local Television News Media's Picture of Children - 2001." Study on Race, Ethnicity and the News. October 2001. Children Now. Complete Study Findings Available for Download at http://www.childrennow.org/newsroom/news-01/pr-10-23-01.cfm. Hangen, Tona. "The Adventures of Amos 'n' Andy: A Social History of an American Phenomenon. Melvin Pattrick Ely. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2001." Journal of Popular Culture. August 2004 Vol. 38 Issue 1, p 214, 2p. Nachman, Gerald. Raised on Radio. New York: Pantheon Books, 1998. Rifkin, Ira. "Covering Conflict: How the News Media Handles Ethnic Controversy." Media & Values, Issue 43. Spring 1988. Print Journal Archived Online by the Center for Media Literacy. http://www.medialit.org/reading_room/article382.html Stark, Phyllis. "A History of Radio Broadcasting." Billboard. November 1, 1994. http://www.kcmetro.cc.mo.us/pennvalley/biology/lewis/crosby/bilboard.htm Stockman, Robbie. "Amos 'n' Andy-ism: What it Was and What It Is." http://people.ucsc.edu/~dramadon/Amos_and_Andy.htm…

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First Broadcast News Job After College at a TV Station in a Low Market

¶ … Broadcast News Job In today's world, media, through the broadcasters and/or journalists has been playing a detrimental part to the people's lives. Becoming a journalists and/or a broadcaster entails a lot of efforts already, and it presents a big impact to the majority of readers or viewers or listeners. First, there are series of responsibilities that all broadcasts journalists should adhere to. Journalists and broadcasters must learn to accept that their role requires being humble and publicly, that what they do is far more subjective and far less detached than the aura of objectivity implies -- and the public wants to believe. If the broadcasters and journalists stop claiming to be mere objective observers, it will not end the charges of bias but will allow them to defend what they do from a more realistic, less hypocritical position (Gillmor, 2004, para 4). Also, journalists and broadcasters need to free (and encourage) reporters to develop expertise and to use it to sort through competing claims, identify and explain the underlying assumptions of those claims, and make judgments about what readers and viewers need to know to understand what is happening (Gillmor, 2004, para 8). The above stated responsibilities may seem very hard to uphold, but that is really part of the job. These responsibilities serve as a guiding point when starting the broadcast career job after college. The Broadcast News Career On Regular workload Being in a broadcast industry, on whatever country, it can be expected that broadcasters or broadcast journalist will be on call 24/7, 365 days a year. This is because every minute counts. There are always news and issues everyday that the public must know. The fresher the news gets published or aired, the better it is for the public. It can also be expected that press conference, announcements and various turn of events do not happen on a per schedule basis, especially if it concerns the national issues such as security and safety, health, calamities and disasters etc. Hence, a responsible broadcast journalist should always be active and on the go on for every update. Indeed, being in a broadcast news career would mean a 24-hour a day work load. On Skills Required An entry level position in a broadcast news career would require dynamism at work. Any broadcaster or journalist at this level should have the so-called 'nose for news' where in he/she must…

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Mass Media and Politics the

The Commission also referred to the three major and crucial responsibilities of the press that are central to its political role-- to provide true and undistorted information, educate the public to make them capable of self-government, and to serve as a watchdog on government. Another function of the press is to represent the various segments of the society as they…

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War Coverage-Media Obsession to Argue

However, intending no disrespect to her, Pfc. Lynch is not a heroine - which she herself recently acknowledged to Diane Sawyer in her first TV interview - but merely the victim of an unfortunate wrong turn." The media mood swings have actually created a great deal of confusion as public feels betrayed and misled after the media realized its own errors in reporting and the hype that it creates about a certain event. The war is a crucial time for any nation and this is when the public expects to be told the truth. However what we receive from newspapers and television is half-baked stories with candy-colored icing. For example during the U.S.-Iraq war, the media presented distorted picture of war and its purpose. The truth was told later but by then, it was already too late. The difference with the Internet is that news comes in from various quarters and we get to read news from other channels as well. This helps us in developing a more balanced view of war and other events. This is the reason why some Internet users even prefer online newspapers to print newspapers as the study revealed: "Online is preferred over print, in some cases by considerable margins, for respondents' ability to find the information they need, the time they save finding the right information, entertainment, enjoyability, how the information is organized, how detailed it is and how useful the information is." (5) For this reason we can conclude that while print newspapers will always be our main source of authentic information, online newspapers are rapidly catching up and may pose a threat to regular newspapers soon. References Stuart Allan, News Culture. Open University Press: Buckingham 1999 William V. Kennedy, The Military and the Media: Why the Press Cannot Be Trusted to Cover a War.: Praeger Publishers. Westport, CT. 1993. The Washington Times. Lynch, West and Common Sense. November 23, 2003. B05. Christopher Hanson, American Idol: The Press Finds the War's True Meaning. Columbia Journalism Review. Volume: 42. Issue: 2. July-August 2003, 58+. By NAA Market and Business Analysis Staff Print and Online Components Bring Strength to Newspapers http://www.digitaledge.org/monthly/2000_01/synergize.html Rusty Coats Online newspapers: are they helping or killing their print parents? -……

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Partisanship of the News Media

Partisanship of the News Media and Its Effect on the Last 25 Years of United States History Media Impact & Partisanship In the 21st century, there has been a particular development on the media front, and which has completely changed the outlook of media towards political factions (Merriam-Webster). The act of partisanship has been on the rise and media houses…

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Media Culture

Media Culture My opinion of traditional news has definitely changed. I am more critical of the news now that I understand theories of framing and agenda setting. For the most part, news outlets play to their target audience, the audience that they intend to deliver to their advertisers. This definitely helps to frame the way that they present the news and present their arguments. By framing issues the way that they do, news agencies can impact on how people think about the facts that are being presented. This can affect the way that people think about certain issues. News organizations can definitely influence our political decisions. When people vote, they do so on the basis of their understanding of the issues and where the different candidates stand on those issues. Much of this information is disseminated through the news media. The news media therefore plays an important role in educating the public prior to voting. When the news media shows bias in its framing of issues or positions, it impacts on that thought process. For example, when a politician makes proposals to solve the budget problem, but those proposals are useless from an economic perspective, but the media frames the proposal as being serious, that makes people think that there is a serious proposal. The media needs to educate people better, for example pointing out the flaws in such a proposal so that the people are voting based on good knowledge and not knowledge that has been randomly selected and presented in an uncritical way. If the media chooses only to present facts, it should help to educate voters on how to interpret those facts so that issues are more properly understood. Right now, the way that media frames issues, it seems that the media does a poor job of helping voters to understand issues and positions properly. This results in some low-quality people being elected, which ultimately harms our nation. 2. Media literacy helps us to be critical of the messages that media sends and the way that those messages are framed. However, media literacy messages can be disrupted by a number of means. The first is that media literacy messages are sometimes suppressed, so that the intended audience does not receive the message. This can lower the degree of media literacy, so that people are generally less critical about what they see and hear. People therefore become more…

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Privatization of U.S. Media

Media Privatization U.S. Privatization of the media in the United States has promoted growth in new media technologies and helped the country reach its current position as a global leader in communications. However, a privatized media restricts access to communications resources, limiting editorial voices to the for-profit sector. Corporate-run media means more potential for economic growth but stifles diversity of opinion. Moreover, media privatization has enabled the current conglomeracy situation in which a relatively few number of major corporations own and operate almost all the media outlets in the United States. If the media is essential to a democracy in disseminating information and permitting a plurality of voices, then media conglomeracy may in itself be undemocratic. By definition, privatized media restricts access to resources. The general public does not read, listen to, or see that which has not cleared the editorial offices of the major media outlets. Those outlets are headed by profit-hungry corporations that pander to investors at the expense of the truth. Biases in reporting and coverage is also a by-product of media privatization and especially of media conglomeracy. Public influence on traditional media content is negligible. Letters to the editor are often the only opportunities an average citizen, one who is not associated with the media, can voice an opinion and reach a wide audience. New media offers a wealth of venues for voices alternative to the mainstream: blogs and other personal Web sites allow individuals to express themselves freely. With regards to the content contained in reputable media outlets online, though, private companies still control what and how topics are covered. What passes as newsworthy differs from source to source but generally an editorial staff selects content that best suits its bottom line. Because media conglomerates are composed of companies with interests other than those related to the media, stakeholders and investors often do not care what passes as……

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Embedded Weapons of Mass Deception How the Media Failed to Cover War in Iraq

Embedded: The Relationship Between Form and Theoretical Assumption in an Account of the Iraq War Danny Schechter's book Embedded: Weapons of Mass Deception looks at the media coverage surrounding the Iraq war and attempts to argue that the American news media failed in its duty to robustly investigate the claims made by the military and civilian government. However, the book's…

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Media Ownership it Is Very

The journalists and station managers in the local Fox TV affiliate are producing less and less of the news segments seen in Madison's Fox channel. Instead, these news and commentary segments are produced in "NewsCentral," a centralized communications production station operated by Sinclair. The same news segments and commentaries are piped to all the local affiliates, from Madison, Wisconsin to…

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Media Criticism Killing the Messenger: 100 Years

Media Criticism Killing the Messenger: 100 Years of Media Criticism contains a collection of fifteen essays on media criticism. A UC Berkeley Graduate School Dean at the time of publication, Editor Tom Goldstein's selections span several centuries, focusing on the American press in particular. Goldstein is keenly aware of both the power of the press over a society and of the lack of adequate self-criticism among media professionals. Killing the Messenger was published in the 1980s, long before the first "Survivor" episode hit American airwaves to spark off a wave of reality television shows. Killing the Messenger also hit the presses decades before the 2000 presidential election or September 11 and therefore predates the current media crises facing the United States. Nevertheless, Goldstein's collection of articles remains relevant. Moreover, even in the 1980s, many of the authors included in the collection were already dead and gone. Included in the compilation are Louis Brandeis, Samuel Warren, William Allen White, George Seldes, Theodore Roosevelt, Spiro Agnew, Walter Lippmann and Charles Merz, Clifton Daniel, Will Irwin, Upton Sinclair, Carl Ackerman, Robert Maynard Hutchins, Joseph Pulitzer, Frederick Lewis Allen, and John Hersey, as well as one selection from the Commission on Civil Disorders. Many of these men wrote before television and even radio were daily realities. Goldstein brings them all under one collective cover, illustrating trends in journalism styles and changes in the ways media is perceived in the United States, as a force of social conscience and social control. Each of Goldstein's selections is prefaced by the editor with a brief synopsis of the writer's contribution to modern journalism. Killing the Messenger is divided into five topical sections: reporting on public and private matters; journalists and their biases; the power and limitations of the press; making reporters better; and news and reality. Goldstein's election to subdivide his essay selection contributes to the collection's organizational appeal. Goldstein is, moreover, a frank and forthright journalist who is unafraid to critique the press or the popular culture that it both informs and reflects. For example, in his Preface, Goldstein states, "Contemporary journalists have not shown any great appetite for self-analysis, and they pretty much hunker down when others pick on them," (xi). His selection of essays is an attempt to awaken a slumbering media from its complacency and self-satisfaction. If Killing the Messenger has any faults it is Goldstein's implicit idealism with which he views the…

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Global PR Trends? The Introduction

Stewart's use of her advocacy for prison reform is an excellent example of trying to turn a negative public event, such as company's chief executive doing jail time because of an insider trading conviction, into a potential PR plus. Thus, proactive PR planning takes place when one seeks publicity and seeks to reach out to the media organizations and to the general public. In contrast, reactive PR is needed when an already established figure, more often than not, is suffering the effects of negative press and must turn his or her image around. PR personnel often accomplish this image rehabilitation by the crisis a different spin, or deflecting attention from the crisis onto another issue. In addition, synthesize the course learning by describing the impact of positive and negative PR in your daily life and provide at least two examples of each in your paper. Of course, one prefers to think one stands above the fray in terms of public relations -- when one studies its influence, and is so cognizant of its insidious uses and subtle effects, one would like to think PR has no impact upon one's own personal world view and behaviors. However, every time one picks up a flyer for a local band playing in a local bar or fraternity house, one is indirectly sampling positive PR for the band, and also the venue. This can be a good thing, as if one attends, one's own enjoyment is enhanced, as well as the band's reputation and the establishment that is hosting the band. If one returns to the venue to buy a drink (or decides to 'rush' the fraternity house) even when the band is not playing, however, the objective of the PR promotion for the bar has been achieved. Even product placement PR can be informative in a positive fashion -- click onto a press release about a new healthy product. One may find a cheaper and better alternative to one's current choice for dinner, or a faster and better way to go about one's personal computing. Simply gaining information, even slanted information, provided one is a savvy consumer can be a boon. The only time PR can be labeled bad in no uncertain terms is when it is unethically disseminated -- such as when one is subject to a press release about a new diet product or fitness aid that appears to be a…

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Children and Media Technology Surrounds

This creates a sense of protection that they are able to feel. By being immediately informed about the occurrence of any eminent danger, these media sources are in fact protecting the children that they at times could harm developmentally. In all, the dire effects that the media has on children are undeniable. The mainstream and social media create false expectations about image, societal values, and privacy. Today's children are affected developmentally by all of these occurrences, as their world is surrounded by these technological advances. However, despite the negativity that is at times associated with the development of mainstream and social media, they have also had positive effects on the lives of today's children. The youth of today are exposed to numerous cultures around the world and are able to better learn from personal interactions with them. The mainstream media has also assisted in keeping children up-to-date with current events and has also served as a medium through which to deliver emergency news if necessary. Mainstream and social media will only continue to develop and its effects on the lives of today's children need to be continuously monitored. References: Anderson, D.R. & Hanson, K.G. (2009). Children, media, and methodology. American Behavioral Science. 52(8), 1204-1219. Bargh, J.A. & McKenna, K.Y.A. (2003). The internet and social life. Annual Review of Psychology. 55, 573-590. Chau, C. (2010). YouTube as a participatory culture. New Directions for Youth Development. 2010(128), 65-74. Christakis, D.A. & Zimmerman, F.J. (2009). Young Children and media: Limitations of current knowledge and future directions for research. American Behavioral Science. 52(8), 1177-1185. Livingstone, S. & Helsper, E.J. (2006). Does Advertising Literacy Mediate the Effects of Advertising on Children? A Critical Examination of Two Linked Research Literatures in Relation to Obesity and Food Choice. Journal of Communication. 56(3), 560-584. Mangold, W.G., & Faulds, D.J. (2009). Social media: The new hybrid element of the promotion mix. Business horizons, 52(4), 357-365. Oakes, J.M. (2009). The Effect of media on children: A methodological assessment from a social epidemiologist. American Behavioral Science. 52(8), 1136-1151. Ponte, C. (2007). Mapping news on children in the mainstream press. European Societies. 9(5), 735-754. Stice, E., Maxfield, J., & Wells, T. (2003). Adverse Effects of social pressure to be thin on young women: An experimental investigation of the effects of "fat talk." International Journal of Eating Disorders. 34(1), 108-117. Von Feilitzen, C. (2012). Children's media use in……

Pages: 5  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 10


Social Media's Massive Influence on

Everyone should understand that what they watch on TV or in the films are there to help them alter their mindsets regarding given viewpoints or opinions. This is a matter of social control since the society in the contemporary era has most of its affairs implicated upon by the media. In the current epoch of globalization, everyone must be conscious of the diverse features that apply in the production of TV programs and films and their connotation on the diverse ethnicities and divisions of the society. The media civilization of current times incline to promote numerous entrepreneurial principles, by damaging the marginal interests, and depicts a profound effort that exists among diverse races, social classes, sex, and societal groups. People should appreciate and understand the character and effect of the production maneuvers of the media relics and their implication on individuals in a given society. It is pertinent to look deeper and comprehend the media society as to its functioning, and how it serves to alter our mindsets, inclinations, and viewpoints, resulting in a social control all at the media's discretion. Bibliography Biagi, S. 2011. Media Impact: An Introduction to Mass Media: An Introduction to Mass Media, Toebben: Cengage Learning. Conrad, R. 2002. How, if at all, have the mass media reinforced social inequalities? Munich: GRIN Verlag. Dill, K. 2009. How Fantasy Becomes Reality: Seeing Through Media Influence, New……

Pages: 6  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4


Mass Media Affecting Degree of Acculturation for Taiwanese Adult ESL Learners Ages 18-25

Acculturation of ESL Learners in Taiwan How impactful is the mass media in terms of the acculturation for Taiwanese adult English as a second language (ESL) learners (ages 18-25)? This issue has important implications for the ESL students both in terms of learning the English language, and in understanding the culture from which the English language is predominant. This paper…

Pages: 10  |  "Literature Review" Chapter  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 20


ABC News

¶ … Coverage Millions of Americans turn to the mainstream media for news about current events. Yet increasingly, the news they see may not be the objective coverage many expect. Contemporary television news has become a melange of enticing entertainment, disparate facts, and often forceful opinion. Anchors and reporters highlight those news items they and their networks deem important. Stories…

Pages: 5  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Technology Such as the Internet

Conclusion The use of modern technology such as the internet indeed has a negative impact on the news industry. This is however dependent on the active population within a given society. The modern technology has really affected effected the news industry by allowing for an easier and quicker access to news content as they come in. This is obvious from the way literature talks about this decline on the news by journalists, news companies by examining extant literature on journalists and how they are working with new technology, blogging, twitter and such kinds of technology. The paper also explored how the news industry makes money from technology (from advertisement) as well as how the technology might make them these companies bankrupt (from a drop in sales value and reduction in advertisement revenue). The statistics on the decline of the news industry which are presented allows us to make possible long-term effects of technology adoption on the news industry to be real. Works Cited Berte, Katrien, DeBens, Elsa, "Newspapers go for advertising: challenges and opportunities in a changing media environment," Journalism Studies, Vol. 9 No.5, pp.692-704.2008 Bird, S.Elizabeth "The future of journalism in the digital environment," Journalism, Vol. 10 No.3, pp.293-5.June 2009 Currah, Andrew "What's happening to our news. An investigation into the likely impact of the digital revolution on the economics of news publishing in the UK," RISJ/Joseph Rowntree Reform Trust Report, Reuters Institute of Journalism, University of Oxford, Oxford, 1 Jan 2009 Deuze, Mark and Bruns, Axel and Neuberger, Christoph "Preparing for an age of participatory news," Journalism Practice, Vol. 1 No.3, pp.322-38. 19 Sep 2007 Domingo, David Thorsten Quandt, Ari Heinonen, Steve Paulussen, Jane B. Singer, and Marina Vujnovic "Participatory journalism practices in the media and beyond: an international comparative study of initiatives in online newspapers," Journalism Practice, Vol. 2 No.3, pp.326-41.2008 Freer, Julie "UK regional and local newspapers," in Anderson, P., Wood, G. (Eds),The Future of Journalism in the Advanced Democracies, Ashgate, London, pp.89-103.2007 Graham, Garry, Alison Smart, "The regional-newspaper industry supply chain and the internet," Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Vol. 15 Iss: 3, pp.196 -- 206, 15 March 2010 Mintel, Regional Newspapers, Mintel, London, 2007 Pincus, Walter "Newspaper narcissism: our pursuit of glory led us away from readers," Columbia Journalism Review, available at: www.cjr.org/archive, 1 June 2009)……

Pages: 6  |  Research Paper  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 7


Media's Role in Time of

The media has a role to play during times of national crisis because it is so strongly depended on by the public. The media also has a responsibility to the public to protect it even if it means withholding information. The media can hurt national security by reporting everything that it finds out. In addition the public may have members who are intent on harming those who live here. If they can gather information through the media that would hurt national interests the media in essence will have had a hand in the destruction of national security. The media does have a role to play during national crisis. It has to be strong, and calm while at the same time providing necessary information to the public. It walks a fine line between freedom of speech and alarming the public to the point of being harmful. Its role as provider of information must be tempered with the common sense to not raise undue fear in those that depend on it for strength and guidance. References Anchoring the nation.(Peter Jennings) American Journalism Review; November 1, 2001; Robertson, Lori Newspaper editorials follow lead of Bush administration. Newspaper Research Journal; January 1, 2003; Billeaudeaux, Andre Domke, David Hutcheson, John S. Garland, Philip 9/11 attack coverage reveals similarities, differences. Newspaper Research Journal; January 1, 2003; Li, Xigen Izard, Ralph sy-Turvy: American universities are places of dizzying unreality -- and this does considerable harm. National Review; October 13, 2003; HANSON, VICTOR DAVIS Local, network TV news shows significant gains. Newspaper Research Journal; January 1, 2003; Poindexter, Paula M. Conway, Mike Exuberant Reporting. Harvard International Review; March 22, 2001; SHILLER, ROBERT J. The local roots of federal policy change: transportation in the 1990s.(Statistical Data Included) Polity; December 22, 2001; Lewis, Paul G. McGhee, Eric Post, Times highlight government's war efforts. Newspaper Research Journal; January 1, 2003; Lee, Changho Anchoring the nation.(Peter Jennings) American Journalism Review; 11/1/2001;……

Pages: 7  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Media Bias and Public Opinion

Such reporting is nothing more than propaganda." (POLLAGANDA - Manipulating Public Opinion, 1998.) This has, the authors suggest, produced a new term - Pollaganda - which is defined as follows: Media polling is used to manipulate public opinion and advance a particular bias. This is primarily accomplished by television networks, on which most people rely for daily news. (Those who…

Pages: 10  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Tylenol Cyanide Case Study

Tylenol Case Analysis: Johnson and Johnson In the contemporary world, taking responsibility and immediate action in the face of a huge crisis is a requirement for any U.S. corporation if they are to survive and maintain their market position and reputation. These types of organizations are expected to be socially responsible to their employees and the public not only if they are directly involved in a crisis involving their products or services, but also if there is an indirect association. In 1982 Johnson and Johnson was faced with this challenge. They were indirectly involved in a catastrophe which killed seven people because their leading pain killer Tylenol was tampered with and unassuming consumers became the victim of such an atrocity. The way in which Johnson and Jonson dealt with the situation is the basis or our case study. In fact, their response was remarkable and commendable. The outcome of this catastrophe created a new standard in "crisis management." The company was applauded for how they responded while prioritizing the consumer over their monetary losses. As a result, Johnson and Johnson recovered and within months after the crisis their markets share exceeded all expectations. This paper discusses the entire case; dissect the elements of the case, symptoms, goals of the organization, management theory, diagnosis the barriers Johnson and Johnson, the media and the public viewed during the crisis, solutions proposed, action plans they used to overcome barriers, consequences to the plan, action plan to the larger context, external forces, implications for two directions of corporate integrity, and it will interpret the original case elements in light of the larger horizons of the era. Johnson and Johnson was seriously affected by the chain of events caused by this crisis, but how they handle this challenge, and how they moved through the process is the very reason they not only survived but are thriving today. Elements of the Case - Company Facts- Johnson and Johnson firm incorporated in 1887. The firm provided sealed surgical dressing which was germ-free, wrapped and ready to be used. In the late 1880's this was considered modern medicine and for antiseptic treatment of wounds. Johnson and Johnson had subsidiaries in more than fifty countries worldwide. McNeil Consumer Products is a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson developed the painkiller called Tylenol. As an oath to the public, Johnson and Johnson created a Credo statement, written in Robert Johnson in…

Pages: 4  |  Case Study  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4


Framing: A Comparison of the New York

¶ … Framing: A Comparison of the New York Times and the People's Daily Coverage of Sino-U.S. Spy Plane Collision of April 1, 2001 It was April 1st, 2001 in the South China Sea. The unprecedented collision between a Chinese fighter jet and a U.S. spy plane triggered a month-long political and diplomatic standoff between two countries. Both parties paid…

Pages: 27  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Staten Island Ferry Accident Case Study

¶ … Island Ferry accident from the standpoint of public relations. The writer explores the way the information was disseminated and given to the public by various agencies. The writer then examines and outlines a model public relations plan that the NYDOT should have adopted. The Staten Island Ferry accident was one of the more shocking tragedies the nation has…

Pages: 5  |  Case Study  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Effects of Media on Culture

¶ … Media on Culture The objective of this work is to write a research proposal relating to the effects of media on culture. The effect of media on culture is well documented in the literature reviewed in this research proposal. Media in advertising affects purchases, choices of styles in clothing, choices in music and in fact affects a plethora of areas within a culture including the commission of violent crimes. Questions that this research intends to seek the answer to are the questions as follows: Do you allow violence in the video-games or television viewing of your household? Have you or any family member committed a violent crime? Who makes the media viewing decisions in your household? Are you swayed by the wishes of other household members and if so what are their ages? METHODOLOGY The proposed methodology of this study is one of a qualitative nature through use of the research instruments a pre-formed survey/questionnaire to be given in a semi-structured interview. PROPOSED TIMELINE The proposed timeline for this survey is a period of six weeks during which randomly selected households will be interviewed. CONCLUSION After having reviewed the literature in the following Annotated Bibliography it is the opinion of this researcher that a better understanding of the influence of media on the culture can be understood through the proposed research as stated. Further this brief study concludes that media affects on culture are both positive and negative. Annotated Bibliography 1. Pope, V. (2002) What Do We Mean by 'Mass Media' and 'Modern Culture' Online available at http://www.litnotes.co.uk/mass_media.htm. Stated in this work is that in the study of media also studied is "how we define out own sense of who and what we are..." Stated as well is that "Since the mid 19th century, we have come to live not only in a situated culture, but in a culture of mediation. The press, film and cinema, television and radio and more recently the Internet, have developed to supply larger scale means of public communication." This work states that there are there major areas of concern which are those of: (1) Mass media has a political and a persuasive power over us. Radio, TV, the press and film can manipulate whole societies. Political propaganda, advertising and the so-called 'mind-bending' power of the media are long-standing causes of debate and concern; (2) Since the 19th century there has been a…

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Mass Communication: Examination

One focus that this textbook is able to provide that others can't is how mass communication relies on women in advertising and how that powerful role can be adapted. Harris, R.J., & Sanborn, S.W. (2013). A cognitive psychology of mass communication. New York: Routledge. This book very aptly examines the way in which basic psychology figures into mass communication and how these fundamental pillars of psychology can be used to sway opinion. The authors look at the distortion present in social mirrors and how emotion can effectively be harnessed to influence public opinion. This book offers a strong foundation of the psychology and psychological strategies that ultimately underscore the bulk of all media tactics. For instance, the book discusses the use of fear in the media and how the media has long-harnessed the technique of fear-mongering as a means of gaining public attention. Finally, the book devotes a chapter to the influence of sexuality and sensuality in the media and how that can be a powerful tool. The book touches upon some of the major arenas of influence in mass communication. Hardt, H. (2008). Critical Communication Studies. New York: Routledge. This book is able to offer more theory and background on the entire field and backdrop of critical communication, while examining the history and theory which have guided it as it continues to evolve. It discusses the pragmatism and the pursuit of social criticism which is an aspect of mass communication as a whole. There's a very thorough discussion of communication studies and the aspects of communication research which influence critical theory of communication and communication itself. Shortcomings, along with common media miscommunications, are discussed, along with a look at how they occur in the first place. Moreover, there's an element of communication research which needs to occur. Finally, this book was ultimately overly based in theory and did not provide enough examples from real life to support its point. Hardt, H. (2008). Myths for the Masses. San Francisco: John Wiley and Sons In this short essay, Hardt essentially describes the process of how our perception has long been distorted via the media. Hardt explains how and why he does not believe that mass communication actually contributes to the promise of democracy or the meaning of self in society. To a certain extent, it appears as though Hardt is making the argument that the media depends on a certain amount…

Pages: 4  |  Annotated Bibliography  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 14


Online Multitasking

Change Management Online Multitasking Perhaps the very best question that you can memorize and repeat, over and over, is, what is the most valuable use of my time right now?'" - Brian Tracy, Motivational Coach and Author (Tracy, N.d.) Eons of Multitasking College students, as well as, businessmen/women, and parents, particularly moms, practiced multitasking eons before the Internet came into…

Pages: 40  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 30


Wealth of Networks Communication (General)

Up until now, access to the informational network -- the internet -- has been near neutral with respect to both the person using it and the data that the person is passing back and forth (Hindman 327-348). The internet operates much like a public highway, in that it is indifferent to the person and his or her destination, as well…

Pages: 14  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 12


Inductive Reasoning and Fallacies in

By using respectable individuals in the society (preacher, attorney, White House personnel, and feminist), Kearns tries to increase the truthfulness of his report. Furthermore, the author uses testimonials, inappropriate use of statistics, and biased statements to generalize about the truth and harmful effects of ass milk to women. Testimonials are in the form of statements from the authorities he cited (mentioned earlier), inappropriate use of statistics are used to prove scientifically the truth of the story, and bias (specifically, appeal to prejudice through personal attacks) when it becomes evident that Kearns is against this ass's milk effect issue, as he labels the producer of this product, Ali Ben Hassan, as a "shadowy and wily businessman," and the 'anti-ass milk' sentiments of the White House (purported to be Pres. Bush's statement) and the Church's (Rev. Wilson). In advertising, the common fallacy committed used is trickery with language, specifically, the use of weasel words and euphemisms. Examples of these weasel words in advertisements are the following: the slogan of Oil of Olay's UV Protectant Lotion: "Proof we can help you feel younger" and "If you'd like Lancome's Vitabolic, you'll love Beautician's Secret." Euphemisms, on the other hand, are mild or vague expressions used in replacement of a harsher or blunter one. Examples of euphemisms include words such as "vertically-challenged" (short), financially able (wealthy), and lovemaking (sex). These examples are substitutes for words that may sound offensive to the receiver of the message. However, one disadvantage of using euphemisms is that it "hides" the real underlying message in the statement. In sum, these fallacies and their examples from popular media information illustrate that, indeed, misleading and false information are proliferated in exchange for profit and patronage and loyalty of the audience (at the expense of truthful reporting of facts and information).…

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Magic Bullet Theory -- Sometimes

'Mass media can be defined as avenues for messages that are created for consumption by large numbers of people. These 'message consumers' are physically separated from one another (to distinguish a mass medium audience from, for example, attendees at a pro-football game). They are also diverse in terms of their interests, values, and other demographical characteristics." Each time a new…

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Hero? And What Has One

For example, Wayne's movies encourage us to think of soldiers as heroic rather than to consider heroic and manly the diplomats and politicians and ordinary people who try to stop war. In trying to understand how mass media like Wayne's movies affect our idea of the heroic (or of anything else), part of what we are asking falls under the…

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Media the Two Media News Outlets That

Media The two media news outlets that I am going to evaluate are the Onion News Network, which a cable television program based on the Onion website, and WikiLeaks. The Onion is a satire-based program, so the stories covered are fictional, but serve the purpose of shedding light on issues in American city. WikiLeaks is a website that serves as…

Pages: 5  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 6


Twitter on Sports Journalism the

He uses the example of a blogger named Nate Dunlevy, who runs an Indianapolis Colts site, and wrote a story about NFL writer Len Pasquarelli's claim that Colts' defensive end Robert Mathis was planning to hold out of training camp once the NFL labor situation was settled (Seth). Pasquerelli had quoted anonymous sources in support of his story, did not…

Pages: 10  |  Thesis  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 10

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