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Project Management Organizations the Most Prominent Project

Project Management Organizations The most prominent project management organizations are: International Project Management Association (IPMA), Project Management Institute (PMI), Center for International Project & Program Management (CIPPM), Association of Project Managers (APM), Canadian Project Forum, Performance Management Association of Canada, Project Management Institute of Canada (PMI - Canada). Another organization of this kind is CompTIA. The Computing Technology Industry Association activates on the global information technology industry. The members of the organization are represented by companies that promote innovation in the it field, and by "professionals responsible for maximizing the benefits organizations receive from their investments in technology" (CompTIA, 2008). In other words, the organization's members are manufacturers, distributors, resellers, solution providers, ISPs, ASPs, software developers, e-commerce and telecom companies. The organization activates in the field of education, training, public policy, and others. CompTIA's successful involvement in all areas of activity has determined a series of non-profit and governmental organizations join the association. In exchange, these organizations and all the other members gain access to industry research, networking and partnering opportunities, benefit from best practices, and from developed standards. The organization's initiatives concern business education, convergence, e-business and software solutions, industry research, it services, it training and education, skills development, and software CEOs. CompTIA's programs are designed to promote industry growth. Projects in Controlled Environments, or PRINCE2, was established in 1996, and represents the contribution of approximately 150 European organizations.……

Pages: 2  |  Thesis  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 2


Quality Management Organizations

Quality Management Organizations The two quality management organizations profiled in this analysis are Q-Plus Labs located in Irvine, California and Quality Auditing LLC who has offices located in Los Angeles, California, Minneapolis, MN and New York City. Both can serve local and national markets given their organizational structures. Of the two, Quality Auditing LLC is the closest locally while also having the ability to operate nationally. For purposes of this analysis Q-Plus Labs is defined as the national quality management organization and Quality Auditing LLC as the local one. Analysis of Quality Management Organizations Beginning with Quality Auditing LLC, their main business is providing auditing and consulting for improving procedures and requirements definition, to ensure their clients pass quality management audits. The main part of this company's business is audit outsourcing, supply quality auditing, suppler quality management auditing and supply chain analysis. Managing quality at a strategic level is critical to ensure each aspect of suppliers, manufacturing, logistics and fulfillment stay within procedural audit parameters, especially in highly regulated industries including pharmaceutical drugs (Hagan, 1984). Quality Auditing LLC has extensive expertise in the following standards ISO 9001, ISO 13485, ISO 14001, as 9100, 21 CFR 211, 21 CFR 820, NAY-1, 10 and CFR 50. Taken together, these standards indicate the company can equally manage supplier and internal quality process control audits across a variety of industries. The extent to which any organization can attain ISO 9001 certification and consistently retain it is a primary indicator of how effectively they will be able to pass regulatory audits on a periodic basis while attaining the benefits of lean manufacturing as well (Psomas, Fotopoulos, Kafetzopoulos, 2011). What Quality Auditing LLC actively promotes is their ability to transform clients into more lean-based and highly effective platforms for future profitable growth. The combining and orchestration of these services are over time intended to change the culture of……

Pages: 2  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Managing Organizational Change From Each Change Perspective,

Managing Organizational Change From each change perspective, what are the key issues to understanding the wildcat strike? The most critical are the employee's needs for having greater autonomy, mastery and purpose in their work. The unilateral decision to institute a tracking system in the form of a swiped card approach to tracking their time is draconian and insulting to every employee working for the airline. The management team might as well just tell them outright they are not trusted, and are merely labour hours to be reshuffled based on demand. BA Management has shown the antithesis of transformational leadership by being authoritarian and lacking in any definition of the program to show how customers will be better served or productivity enhanced. A second key issue is the complete lack of coordination with the unions, a lack of announcement over the program, no input whatsoever from employees or management, and a complete lack of understanding of why employees choose to work for them given the different hours as well. A third aspect of understanding the wildcat strike is that the meaning fo the swiped card program was only relevant and explained within BA management, there had been no announcement or development of an educational program as to why it was important in the first place. For change management to be effective there must be relevance and meaning communicated to employees if the planned changes are to be acted upon and successful (Sargent, Hardy, 2011). Assume that you have been retained as a change consultant by BA management to advise them on how to avoid such a situation in the future. What lessons emerge from each perspective and what recommendations would you draw from each in constructing your advice to BA management?……

Pages: 2  |  Case Study  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Management -- Organizational Theory the Article by

Management -- Organizational Theory The article by Chieh-Peng Lin (Modeling Corporate Citizenship, Organizational Trust, and Work Engagement Based on Attachment Theory) is published in the Journal of Business Ethics (2010). This article delves into corporate citizenship and how to develop trust within an organizational environment. Lin posits that if more individuals in an employment environment could embrace a "work engagement" those individuals could avoid "burnout" and "low performance" (Lin, 2010, p. 517). Moreover, employees that embrace a "work engagement" approach would mean that those individuals would be furthering the interests of their organization (Lin, p. 517). Work engagement is defined by Lin as a "positive, fulfilling, work-related state of mind" that is characterized by "vigor, dedication, and absorption" including a very strong identification with their efforts on the job and "feelings of enthusiasm, inspiration, pride and challenge" (Lin, p. 517). but, the theme in this article goes deeper: Lin seeks to know how work engagement dovetails with other emerging organizational / management theories. What is the problem that is presented in this scholarly article? The author points out that while "corporate citizenship" or "corporate social responsibility" (CSR) are important initiatives in the community of companies that are competing for consumer attention, there is a lack of data that show how CSR helps build employee trust. And so the problem encountered by Lin is this: what is the relationship between CSR, organizational trust and work engagement? And moreover, Lin wants to know if the "attachment theory" can be used to explain the relationship between the three concepts mentioned in the sentence above. The author seeks to know which "dimensions of perceived corporate citizenship" influence a person's engagement with work and influence the amount of organizational trust the employee experiences (Lin, p. 518). (the attachment theory, in Lin's definition: like all animals, humans make important and lasting "affectional bonds" (attachments) with "familiar, irreplaceable organizations"; if those bonds……

Pages: 2  |  Article Critique  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Organization Management Organizational Management in the U.S.

Organization Management Organizational Management in the U.S. Army One of the most essential functions that management performs in a given business or corporate entity is the organization of that business or entity. This includes such elements as determining and implementing the most efficient division of labor, a system that allows for the delegation of authority, decisions regarding the departmentation and/or integration of the various activities and offices within the entity, developing a span of control over the entities operations, and the coordination of all aspects of the business or entity towards a common goal, and with common values and practices (Erven 2009). Each of these areas of managerial organization is essential to the efficient and productive operation of the business or entity, though some outfits might require a focus on specific elements of the general organizational needs. The United States Army is one such organization. The delegation of authority and coordination of the various departments and resources at the U.S. Army's disposal is of paramount importance to the conducting of successful operations; though departmentation, division of labor, and a span of control are also highly important elements in the Army's organization, they are not focal points in the manner that delegation and coordination are. These concepts constitute the Army leadership's primary perspectives when making organizational choices, such as the allocation of resources. Specifically, the organization and allocation of human resources and available technological resources by the United States Army is marked by a conscious and purposeful obeisance to a strict chain of command, and to the coordination of efforts as dictated from an overall vantage point, with varying degrees of success in this organizational scheme. The organization of human resources is carried out by Army management in a highly detailed manner. Schedules of deployment, evaluations and results, promotions, and an abundance of other information is made readily available to all Army personnel at any time, and is highly organized and tightly controlled (HRC 2010). Troop deployment timetables are analyzed and developed from a perspective of overall Army needs and individual soldiers' necessary leave times, both of which are under constant review. This makes for a highly structured deployment and organizational system that dictates precisely where human resources will be allocated, to what purposes, and the duration of that deployment (HRC 2010). Skill sets and abilities as well as job titles and rank are all taken into account in the human…

Pages: 4  |  Essay  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 3


Knowledge Management Organizational Communication Organizational

A knowledge manager should have different backgrounds; for instance Information Technology, Marketing, Management etc. An effective knowledge manager is the one who is an all rounder and knows well about organizational behaviour, marketing, culture, technology etc. Looking at all above discussion, it can be concluded that organizations must train their employees and make them learn the techniques of communicating effectively. Organizations that want to succeed make sure that they allocate sufficient time and effort for training their employees on effective knowledge management through proper communication and consider this activity as one of the core activities in the organization's time and performance management systems. Organization should make its employees understand that effective communication and learning, which are significant areas of knowledge management (Lehaney, 2004) and always results in proper transfer of knowledge, are not only beneficial for the organization but also benefit employees in the form of increase in salary, career development and getting bonuses. References Cortada, J,. & Woods, J,. ( 2000), The knowledge management yearbook 2000-2001, Butterworth -- Heinemann. Davenport, T.H. & Laurence, P. (2000). Working Knowledge: How Organizations Manage What They Know. Boston, Massachusetts: Harvard Business School Press. Eisenberg, M., Goodall, L., & Trethewey, A. (2007). Organizational communication: Balancing creativity and constraint, 5th ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's. Karagiannis, D., Reimer, U.,(2002), Practical aspects of knowledge management, 4 rth International Conference, Springer. Lehaney, B., Clarke, S., Coakes, E., & Jack, G .(2004), Beyond Knowledge Management, Idea group Publishing, USA. Luthans, F., Welsh, DH B., & Taylor, L.A. (1988). A descriptive model of management effectiveness. Group & Organization Studies, 13(2). Malhotra, Y. (1997). "Knowledge Management in Inquiring Organizations." Proceedings of 3rd Americas Conference on Information Systems (Philosophy of Information Systems Mini-track). Rastogi, P.N. (2000). Knowledge Management and Intellectual Capital - The New Virtuous Reality of Competitiveness. Human Systems Management, 19(1), 39-49.……

Pages: 5  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


Managing Organizational Change and Improvement

Managing Organizational Change and Improvement Globalization is changing the workplace at an incredible pace. This means, that because the competition is more severe, employers must ensure that productivity levels remain high. To achieve this objective requires that all employers address the concerns of their employees. Otherwise, they could be facing a situation of high employee turnover and low productivity. The…

Pages: 8  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 7


Business Management Organizational Change Discuss the Role

Business Management Organizational Change Discuss the role of values in supporting organizational change. Values are the standards of appeal by which one chooses between alternate behaviors. They often emerge as opinions, ideas, or feelings about a particular subject. A leader's effectiveness is often measured by their ability to influence the activities of their subordinates. Value conflicts can exist at the…

Pages: 8  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Managing Organizational Change the Impact of Change

Managing Organizational Change The impact of change on individuals and organizations can be minimal or substantial. Discuss some of the tools organizations can use to diagnose the most appropriate change. Which do you think would be most effective and why? In diagnosing change within any organization, there are a multitude of factors that need to be taken into account, many outside the organization and therefore not under the direct control of management. The series of concepts, frameworks and tools including the 7-S Framework (Kaplan, 2005), the Star Model, Congruence Model, Burke-Litwin Model (Moody, Smith, 2004), PESTEL framework (Walsh, 2005), GAP Analysis, Stakeholder Analysis, Force-Field Change and others all have been studied as a means to lessen resistance to change. Each of these concepts, frameworks or tools can also be used for diagnosing which specific strategy for change is the most appreciate for any given organization. In analyzing these concepts, frameworks and tools it is clear that the most adaptable in terms of taking into account both internal and external factors is the 7-S Model (Kaplan, 2005). The logic supporting this specific model is that it……

Pages: 1  |  Thesis  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 1


Management Organizational Stakeholders Organizational Stakeholders Can Be

¶ … Management Organizational stakeholders Organizational stakeholders can be defined as an organization, group, or a person that may be interested or concerned with the affairs of an organization. The policies, objectives and actions of an organization may have an impact on the stakeholders or the stakeholders to impact on the organization. Some of the examples of those stakeholders who play key roles include unions, suppliers, shareholders, government agencies, employees, directors, creditors and the environment from which the organization gains its resources. The roles of stakeholders may not always be equal. The customers of a company are eligible to trading practices that are fair but the company cannot consider the same way it considers its employees. A good example of a negative effect of the stakeholders is in a scenario where the company is making a decision of lower costs and is planning on a round of layoffs. This affects negatively on the workers' community and later on, on the local economy. Persons who have shares in the company are affected positively in a case where the company launches new products and experiences profit where the stock price rises. Every organization is inclusive of those stakeholders whose views need to be considered in cases of the organization working out strategic plans or important decisions concerning the organization. The customer is the main stakeholder who may happen to exist as another organization or a private buyer. The major aspects that matter most to the customer are timeless, price and quality of the product or the services that the organization renders. In a case where the organization is a supplier, then they will have to deal with the pressure of meeting this aspect while being considerate the most profitable ways or spending within the restrictions of the organization. The existence of various customers' preferences, the suppliers of goods and service have the chance to offer competition. The competitor is considered a stakeholder in an organization as they experience the impact of an organization's actions that they are in competition with.……

Pages: 2  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Managing Organizational Change A) Approaches to Change

Managing Organizational Change a) Approaches to change Change at DuPont was implemented as a natural process by which the organizational evolved. It was not embraced as a formal phenomenon nor was any emphasis placed on the creation of a context in which the employees and the firm would be prepared for a smooth transition. In other words, organizational development as a framework for change was not widely used. On the other hand however, the firm focused on the sense-making approach, in the meaning that it was expected of the strategies implemented to be effective and efficient, as well as suitable and able to support the company in reaching its objectives. In a context in which the firm did not implement a specific pre-designed framework for dealing with change, it nevertheless turned to appreciative inquiry -- with the support of the academic community -- and strived to identify the best solution to the specific organizational problem. b) Compatibility of approaches At a general level, it could be assumed that the three approaches to change -- organizational development, appreciative inquiry and sense-making -- are incompatible as they each present different means of dealing with change, from a structured approach, to a customized approach. In essence nevertheless, with the real context of an organizational change situation, the three models are not entirely self exclusive. In other words, in the context of an organizational change situation, the manager will not implement a strict and pre-defined model of change management, but will start from such a model of OD to gradually build on it. In other words, it would customize the solution based on the frameworks available, as well as based on the specifics of the encountered situation (Blecker, 2005),……

Pages: 2  |  Article Review  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Managing Organizational Culture Organizational Culture: Definitions and

Managing Organizational Culture Organizational Culture: Definitions and Characteristics Whenever people from different backgrounds with different beliefs, values, and norms converge as a group, a new culture is created that gives the group a distinct characteristic and dynamic. What happens, in effect, is the formation of an organizational culture that is unique from other cultures because it has a specific setting…

Pages: 8  |  Essay  |  Style: Harvard  |  Sources: 10


Managing Organizational Change Identify the Key Elements

Managing Organizational Change Identify the key elements of the resistance to change described in this situation. For Perrier the key elements of resistance to change emanate from the once lucrative level of sales they had achieved, only to see their sales levels plummet due to benzene being found in their water. From a very lucrative business that provided the financial means to meet the unions' demands for 35-hour work weeks and average annual salaries of $32,000 a year to near-bankruptcy, the resistance to change began when Perrier senior management began tightening budgets, entertaining take-over talks with Nestle' and also looking to make symbolic statements of how drastic the economic conditions were for the company. The CGT (Confederation general du travail -- General Confederation of Labour) controls the Perrier processing plant with 93% of the plants' 1,650 workers being members. When Perrier management decided to cut 15% of its workforce, there was uproar from CGT. To make matters worse, Perrier management purchased cases of a competitor's latest beverage, Badoit Rouge, and placed it throughout the company cafeterias. Unionized workers saw this as an insult, further galvanizing them against any efforts to share in the financial burdens of Perrier's senior management. All these key elements were in retrospect were autocratic on the part of Perrier and were taken as condescending and arrogant instead of inviting ownership, which would have been a far more effective as a change management strategy (Brown, Cregan, 2008). As the senior management at Perrier continued to focus not on collaboration but more towards dominating unions into approving a 15% reduction in staff, the situation became even more tense (Passariello, 2004). The CGT union leader Jean-Paul Franc decried the lack of consideration and cooperation from Perrier and Nestle senior management, leading to an impasse in the negotiations (Passariello, 2004). Only after the French government intervened did the company and union make progress in reaching an agreement. Construct a change management strategy for dealing with the situation. In……

Pages: 2  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 1


Human Resources Managing Organisational Culture

d). Understanding of organisational culture and cultural types also helps the understanding of why managerial reforms may impact differently within and between organisations. An organisation with a predominantly internal process culture, for example, may be more resistant to reforms aimed at promoting innovation. It is expected that staff in high uncertainty avoidance cultures to be more concerned with rule-following and…

Pages: 34  |  Dissertation  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Managing Organizational Culture

¶ … opportunity exists for the company to expand internationally by setting up operations in the emerging economies of China and India. The question to consider is how to build cultural harmony between the facilities operating in three different countries. The question of whether it would be better to establish a certain national organizational culture is likely would be considered…

Pages: 34  |  Dissertation  |  Style: Harvard  |  Sources: 0


Organizational Behavior One of the

Apart from reason, a heterogeneous organization should also understand the culture and personality of each member of the organization in order to become effective in managing change. 8. The scarcity of resources alone would be ground enough for diagnostic information to be unavailable; thus, it is imperative that members have sufficient resources to work efficiently. 9. Evaluation in OD programs are needed because it takes into account external and internal forces that are vital to the implementation of intervention in the organization. However, it is important to note that OD program evaluations are also difficult to accomplish, simply because it tests an intervention program at its first level; thus, it is also important to create follow-up evaluations to check whether the evaluations are as effective as the interventions as well. 10. I remember resisting change when I first became acquainted with the Internet technology, especially online communications, such as chatting, e-mailing, and joining online groups with people whom I share my interests with. Initially, I resisted this new technology because I believed that the Internet is just hype, in the same way that television is so much hyped during its inception in the commercial market. The criticisms given to TV and other technologies convinced me that the Internet is just a fad just like the other technologies. Of course, my resistance to this technological change was due to the fact that I have few friends who subsist to Internet technology as well. Thus, the lack influence from my social environment did not convince me to use and subscribe to the Internet. I felt no urgency to conform and use this new fad in computer technology. Apart from the weak social influence of my environment, my perceived compatibility with the Internet had discouraged me to use the Internet, since I simply cannot comprehend the fact that the Internet exists for mere socialization only (of course, these are my biased thoughts about the Internet when I was still skeptical about its usefulness to computer users (and even non-users)). After two years, when I felt it necessary for my work to use the Internet, I began accessing and subscribing to the Internet. My experience illustrates how changes in the social environment encouraged me to adapt to the……

Pages: 3  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Human Resource Management Comparing and

Human Resource Management Comparing and Contracting Two Change Case Studies; Ajax Minerals and Perrier Identify two (2) sources of resistance to change in the Ajax Minerals exercise and describe how the organization dealt with each type of resistance. In any organizational change there is the potential for resistance; many models of change emphasize the need to overcome resistance for most…

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Project Management February J. 2014

(Kerry, 2010). A project manager is an important project leader who communicates a project's vision to the subordinates. A project leader plans a project, measures performances of a project and solves problems that could arise from a project implementation. Common leadership styles used to run a project include: Charismatic Transformational Transactional, Autocratic, Situational, Participative, Autocratic or Democratic. To achieve organizational…

Pages: 9  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 7


Managing Organizational Change Queensland Leisure

Step 4 -- communicate the vision; it is very significant to the change management process what happens to the vision once it has been formed. There is need to communicate the QLG change and the intention frequently and effectively as well as powerfully such that it is part of everything that one does. Step 5 -- remove obstacles; this is the next logical step once the leader of the vision has achieved the belief and participation of the employees in the new changes that shall have been introduced in QLG. This response, is achieved will be an indicator that they are ready to get the benefits of the changes yet to be implemented in QLG. Step 6 -- create short-term wins; bearing that success motivates everyone, there is need to make the people feel the benefits of the change by and by rather than waiting till the very end which could take months like the complete change over in technology in QLG will take six months. Step 7 -- build on change; this comes on the realization that many change initiatives fail due to the declaration of victory and meeting of targets too early in time. Each success in the implementation phase of the newt technology at QLG will act as a platform to build upon the issues that went right as the management identifies areas that can be improved. Step 8 -- imbibe the changes in corporate culture; it is true that for any change to be long lasting, there is need to imbibe it into the culture of the organization since the corporate culture will more often than not dictate what gets done and what does not get done. References Kotter International (2012). The 8-Step Process for Leading Change. Retrieved February 6, 2014 from http://www.kotterinternational.com/our-principles/changesteps Miranda B., (2013). What Causes Resistance to Change within an Organization. Retrieved February 6, 2014 from……

Pages: 4  |  Case Study  |  Style: Chicago  |  Sources: 4


Organizational Behavior: Motivation and Performance Management

In these networking groups, as Inskeep points out, employees share experiences and single out their individual weak points. This is critical as it is in identifying their individual weak points that employees can strategize on how to eliminate such weaknesses and improve their performance. In the end, the organization benefits by having a more efficient and motivated workforce. Section 2 Dr. Peter Drucker's Statement: "You cannot motivate employees, employees must motivate themselves." Meaning of the Statement in Regard to Motivation Theory When it comes to employee motivation, the best results are achieved not by promising incentives or cracking the whip, but by taking deliberate steps to stimulate self-motivation on the part of employees. Self-motivation promotes not only self-confidence, but also composure and collectedness in employees as they seek to perform their various duties. Some of the Methods that Could be Used to Promote Self-Motivation in the Workplace Self-motivation in the workplace could be promoted in a number of ways. These include: 1. Roping-in Employees in Decision Making Allowing employees to be part of the decision-making process promotes their commitment to organizational goals and enhances their self-esteem. Given that motivation is largely about will, as opposed to the application of specific techniques (i.e. offering of incentives), involving employees makes them feel as part and parcel of the organization -- thereby inspiring and stimulating their drive and enthusiasm. 2. Goal-Setting The performance of employees is likely to become better when goals are set and objectives clearly defined. Essentially, goal-setting not only spurs involvement, but also ensures that everybody is moving in the same direction. Goal-setting stimulates participation from employees, thus further enhancing their commitment to the achievement of the said goals and objectives. 3. Provision of Opportunities for Growth and Professional Enrichment Employees who enjoy that which they engage in are likely to be more motivated than those that find tasks challenging or confusing. It is, therefore, important for the organization to not only provide in-house training for employees, but also encourage them to further enhance their professionalism by continuing their education. References Sims, R. (2002).……

Pages: 2  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Organizational Redesign -- Transferable Skills Managing Organizational

Organizational Redesign -- Transferable Skills Managing organizational change in general and implementing organizational redesign in particular present serious challenges for organizations. Doing so successfully generally requires effective management and specific technical, communication, client relations, and detail-management skills at many different levels. Technical skills must match the needs of the new direction of the organization. Communication skills are crucial from the boardroom to front-line operations and at every level in between. Client relations and customer service skills can make or break a commercial organization largely independent of other important factors. Finally, detail-management skills are also capable of contributing substantially to success or failure at every level of the organization. Specific Skills and Organizational Redesign Technical skills are crucial to organizational success but they are not necessarily the highest in importance with specific respect to organizational redesign. That is primarily because issues in relation to technical skills are generally addressed by executive and managerial decisions rather than by decisions or circumstances at the operational level (George & Jones, 2008). Similarly, client-relations skills and detail-management skills are also extremely important in organizational redesign, but issues in those areas also are addressed by executive and managerial decisions. In the case of all three skill areas, organizational leaders may institute changes in specific requirements, policies, procedures, and protocols, but their successful implementation is more a matter of good hiring, effective training (or retraining) programs, and appropriate business-unit and personnel assignments (George & Jones, 2008). The Comparative Importance of Communication Skills If one particular area or skill set is most important to organizational success in general and to successful organizational redesign in particular, it would be communications.……

Pages: 2  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Safety International Disaster Management Organizations

These organizations have been blind to gender issues in disaster management; this makes it difficult to determine the needs of the differentiated impact on men and women. Different ethnic groups have different cultures that sometimes require the disaster management teams are conversant with the cultures; these cultures can include beliefs or language, which helps in communication. Organizations treat disasters differently hence inequitable distribution of resources. This is because different disasters attract donor attention according to the effects of a disaster. Survivors are left in the good will of others to survive this cause, discrimination, residential segregation, social inequalities and racial-based stereo types. Due to societal structures, the aftermath of disasters always, leave people with psychological effects, which the organizations have not adequately dealt with. Disasters can be mitigated but it has often become difficult to remove vulnerable people from disaster prone environments. Variant policies have been developed and established to mitigate disaster effects. Some of the international policies include (UNISDR) for 1999, United Nations international strategy for disaster reduction; this policy ensures that countries implement strategies that aid in disaster reduction. It includes building hospitals and constructions resilient to disasters to strengthen response. UNDRO and IDNDR are policies, which were put in place in the 1990's. These policies ensure that there is reduction in poverty levels, loss of lives and economic disruptions. United Nations UNDP has programs which prevent crisis and help in development. It operates in over one hundred countries and works towards recovery after disasters. Conclusion Policy implementation will lead to designing of strategies and practices that will minimize vulnerabilities. These practices will reduce physical hazards and enhance economic and social capacity to adopt. There are different disaster training articles and sources; they are not compatible with disasters faced by different countries. Countries have different types of disasters hence need unique training sources. References Damon, P. (2011). Introduction to International Disaster Management. Atlanata: Elsevier. Rodriguea, H.E. (2007)(Handbook of Disaster Research). London:……

Pages: 2  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Kotter's and Lewin's Models and

The model is easily understood and continues in use today. Also, force field analysis lends itself to more scientific decision making. There are also some limitations associated with Lewin's model. The transition or Change phase can be a pleasant trap as people become comfortable in temporary situations where they are not accountable for the hazards of normal work, and where talking about change may substitute for real action. A different problem can occur with the Freeze phase. Organizations sometimes encourage this phase to remain in a state of slushiness where freezing is never really achieved, which in theory makes the next unfreezing easier. The problem with this approach is that people fall into a state of change shock where they work at a low level of efficiency and effectiveness while they await the next change. They come to feel that it is not worth the effort to improve what they do (Straker, 2011). Further critique of Lewin's model argues that it "is very rational, goal and plan oriented" and that "change looks good on paper, as it makes rational sense, but when implemented the lack of considering human feelings and experiences can have negative consequences" (Kritsonis, 2005, p. 6). There is the danger that individuals become so enthusiastic about a new change that they overlook the "feelings, attitudes, past input or experience" of other employees. As a result they can encounter either resistance or little enthusiasm for the proposed changes (Kritsonis, 2005). In summary, both Kotter's and Lewin's models offer ways of supporting strategic change. They allow for diagnostic tasks that enable a manager to effectively plan and implement change. Works Cited 21st Century Leader. (n.d.). Kotter's eight step model of change. Retrieved January 12, 2012 from: http://www.21stcenturyleader.co.uk/kotter/ Chapman, A. (2010). Change management. Retrieved January 12, 2012 from: http://www.businessballs.com/changemanagement.htm DealTime. (2000). Leading change, or changing leaders? [Review of the book Leading Change]. Retrieved from http://www.dealtime.com/Leading_Change_by_John_P_Kotter/leading-change-or-changing-leaders/RD-990772/reviews Faucheux, M. (2009). Negotiating the advantages and disadvantages of change management. Retrieved January 12, 2012 from: http://www.brighthub.com/office/project-management/articles/18477.aspx Kritsonis, A. (2004-2005). Comparison of change theories. International Journal of Scholarly Academic Intellectual Diversity, 8(1), 1-6. Leadersphere. (2008). Organizational diagnostic models A review & synthesis. Retrieved January 12, 2012 from: http://leadersphere.com/img/OrgmodelsR2009.pdf MindTools. (2012). Lewin's change management model Understanding the three stages of change. Retrieved January 12, 2012 from: http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newPPM_94.htm Reynolds, L. (2009). Organisational change: Which model should you use? Retrieved January 12, 2012 from: http://www.trainingzone.co.uk/topic/strategy/organisational-change-which-model-should-i-use Straker, D. (2011).…

Pages: 6  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 6


Change Using Kotter's 8 Steps,

This would have helped employees in two ways. First, it would have given employees that intended to stay some additional measure of job security. Second, it would have made it more possible for employees who would eventually be terminated to find alternate employment, by staggering the number of employees to hit the job market. For McDonald's, the most critical change would have been to have changed the timing. McDonald's failed to observe cultural changes that reflected a desire to have a variety of healthier options at McDonald's. It also ignored the menu changes at competing restaurants. Had it engaged in better timing for its healthier menu, it would have had a much more effective counter campaign to alleviate some of the bad publicity that was inherent when Super Size Me was released. For example, using choices available on its current menu, McDonald's could have seized on an advertising campaign similar to that used by Subway restaurants, and featured a real-life person who ate exclusively at McDonald's and managed to lose weight and gain health. Such a campaign would have been impossible using only McDonald's old menu. References Applebaum, S., Habashy, S., Malo, J., & Shafiq, H. (2012). Back to the future: Revisiting Kotter's 1996 change model, Journal of Management Development, 31(8), 764-782. Palmer, I., Dunford, R., & Akin, G. (2009). Managing organizational change: A multiple perspectives approach, 2nd Ed. McGraw-Hill. Parker, D., Verlinden, A., Nussey, R., Ford, M., & Pathak, R.D. (2013). Critical evaluation of project-based performance management: Change intervention integration, International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, 62(4), 407-419. Sato, S., Lucente, S., Meyer, D., & Mrazek, D. (2010).……

Pages: 4  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Company I Worked for Changed Its Sales

¶ … company I worked for changed its sales structure significantly in order to respond to changes in the competitive environment of the marketplace. This change was introduced from the top levels of management, which believed that the company's full range of products were not being fully exposed to the marketplace, largely as a result of the sales structure, including both the configuration of the representatives' territories and the process by which representatives sold into those territories. The change had numerous implications at all levels of the company and was felt by most members of the company to be -- although perhaps necessary for the company's survival in an increasingly competitive marketplace -- a fairly uncomfortable development. In this brief paper, I will discuss and analyze the change in my company through an approach that accounts for stakeholder perceptions and multiple perspectives, showing the change to be a "story of change," as described by Palmer, Dunford, and Akin (2008). Following a brief summary of the change structure and events, as well as a description of the need that drove the change in the first place, I will describe the effects and implications of the change for a number of the stakeholders in the company's efforts, and will discuss the lessons learned from the change experience. Need for Change and Change Structure/Events. My company had, over the course of several generations, evolved into a large national player in its marketplace. That marketplace itself had been characterized for decades as a producer-driven, value-based market in which public monies were spent on products that were chosen at the local level, so there was little effort on the part of consumers to demand product innovations. They simply looked at what producers offered and attempted to get the most for their money. There were a number of national players that competed for market share, and the companies were all relatively evenly-matched in terms of product offerings, sales force configurations, and the like. However, following the advent of the internet and the introduction of new regional players who were able to enter the marketplace with very low overhead due to innovative production plans made possible by new technologies, competition had begun to increase significantly in the past decade or two, as consumers had a range of options for product choice and delivery. Specifically, the change effort was made to break sales territories down into smaller and…

Pages: 3  |  Essay  |  Style: Harvard  |  Sources: 2


Total Awards Overview- There Are

Each can be seen as a slice of the overall pie in relation to compensation, development, and most especially retention and position in the marketplace. The Financial View -- What are the costs associated with compensation? What types of risks does the organization face? What are the current limitations to the program in place? The Environmental View -- What is the current technological, managerial, and even communications environment within the organization? Is the organization poised for innovation and development? The Competitive Market View -- In relation to the competition, how does the organization value its resources (Human) within the overall marketplace? What is the total compensation value as compared to the competition, and how is the organization perceived? The Employee View -- In general, what are the employees' needs, wants, values -- what is their current satisfaction with compensation? With management? With the organization? How large a factor are certain items of compensation (wages vs. benefits vs. development, etc.) within the rubric of the organization? The Workforce View -- What are the demographics and psychographics currently? What is the perceived change? How might a rewards program contribute to that change? And the Employer View -- What are the organization's strategic objectives? What is the current overall organizational philosophy? What requirements are there for current rewards and how might this change? What behaviors does the organization want/need in order to revamp the rewards package? This process is not difficult for an organization, but does require the honest collection and evaluation of information in a logical, six-step format. 1) Analyze and Assess needs with a clear and cogent understanding of the current situation; 2) Using the organization's mission and strategy, design a rewards package that fits the overall philosophical bent of the organization; 3) Develop a plan based on purpose and objectives with measurable goals and structure within an agreed upon timeline; 4) Implement the program as a pilot study with a focused team to monitor; 5) Communicate the plan effectively to employees while considering the audience; be honest and open; 6) Evaluate and revise based on individuated results (Manas and Graham, 2003). Describe the eight steps in the communication Process - Anytime a new project or objective is released to an organization, it is important to have a cogent communication plan. One approach relies on an eight-step program that will effectively communicate, relate, and then finally evaluate the new program or…

Pages: 4  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4


Case Study on Organizational Behavior and Management

Organizational Behavior and Management Team Building: Organizational Behavior and Management One of the best ways to manage the behavior of employees in an organization is through team building. There are many ways in which teams can be built, and there are also many different types of teams - and different exercise that can be used to help create the best…

Pages: 6  |  Case Study  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Organizational Management -- Concepts and Terminology Organizational

Organizational Management -- Concepts and Terminology Organizational Culture and Behavior Organizational culture refers to the collective attitudes and values that characterize business organizations. Organizational behavior refers to the manner in which business organizations implement and manifest the various elements of their organizational culture (Robbins & Judge, 2009). The last organization for which I worked maintained an organizational culture that emphasized equal opportunity, ethical business practices, and the concept of developing leaders from within the organization. That organization also maintained a strong commitment to social welfare and to environmental responsibility. Employees were encouraged to participate in various efforts that benefited the local community and the organization carefully monitored compliance with environmentally conscious policies and practices. Diversity In contemporary American society and business, diversity refers to the differences among individuals comprised by society and business organizations. Generally, diversity includes such differences as gender, race, ethnicity, religion, culture, nationality, sexual orientation, and gender identity (George & Jones, 2008). Diversity is an important aspect of modern business management because statutory law as well as fundamental objective concepts of social responsibility and morality require that all individuals in American society enjoy the same basic rights, opportunities, and benefits. Certain classifications (such as race, ethnicity, religion, and gender) are recognized and protected by federal law; others (such as sexual orientation and gender identity) are only recognized and protected under the laws of some states and are neither recognized nor protected by the laws of other states (George & Jones, 2008). The most observable aspects of diversity with organizations would be the apparent makeup of their personnel in terms of race, ethnicity, nationality, and gender. Communication Communications encompasses the various ways that information is transmitted, shared, received, and stored within business organizations (George & Jones, 2008). Within business organizations, business units, hierarchical chains, and individuals must communicate with one another extensively. Likewise, business organizations must be able to communicate externally with other business organizations, customers, suppliers, contractors, customers, and government agencies. Different forms of business communications typically include electronic messages (i.e. email), written (hard copy) memoranda, telephonic, face-to-face, in addition to other industry-specific or task-specific uses of media such as two-way radios or specialized proprietary software applications (George & Jones,……

Pages: 3  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Organization Diversity, Conflict Management and Policies Diversity

Organization DIVERSITY, CONFLICT Management and POLICIES Diversity refers to a combination of factors, which gives workforce an identity of its own. In our country, diversity of workforce is grounded in its varied ethnic backgrounds, sexual orientation, gender and age. With workforce composed of such unique factors, there is always an alarming potential for conflicts and discrimination. It is important for a firm to develop HR policies that reflect the changing corporate culture where diversity plays an important role and its management is a critical element in the success of the company. Organizational policies should reflect a company's desire to treat diverse workforce with due respect and to address its grievances properly. In this connection, it needs to train its human resource management to handle diversity effectively while minimizing the risk of potential conflicts. Everything including recruitment, screening, interviewing and performance appraisal procedures can hinder smooth management of diversity if they do not reflect the diverse needs and aptitude of a highly diverse workforce. Human Resource managers today play a key role in the success of any organization because they help in minimizing risks of conflict and discrimination that arise due to diversity in the workplace. For this reason, it is the responsibility of the organization to provide adequate training to the HR staff, which is assigned the tasks of addressing grievances, facilitating communication and managing change in the organization. Diversity management has thus come to occupy an important place in organizational policies. Bendick et al. (2001) write: Starting in the mid-1980s and accelerating throughout the 1990s, many of these efforts have evolved into more ambitious undertakings with a different label -- diversity training -- and a more strategic role in human resource management... For example, a 1995 survey of the 50 largest U.S. industrial firms found that 70% had a formal diversity management program, typically including training, and an additional 8% were developing one... In a 1994 survey of members of the Society for Human Resource Management, 33% reported that their employers provided training on workforce diversity, making it about as common as training in sales techniques (35%) or clerical skills (3-1%)....And in a 1995 survey, 50% of members of the American Management Association reported having formal programs for managing diversity, with training a usual component; this figure had risen from 46% in 1992." Diversity training is seen as a high effective strategy for elimination of discriminatory practices and risks…

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Project Management Your Company Planning

Organizational culture refers to the collective behavior of the employees who form an organization and the different meanings that the employees attach to their actions Valentine, 2011. An organization's culture will include its values, norms, vision, habits, systems, working language, and beliefs. Organizational culture is taught to new employees through informal trainings like stories, rituals, myths, and shared behavior. It is mostly formed from how an organization is structured, how it uses its resources, the employees in the organization, and how work is completed or the process of completing work in the organization. A good culture is formed when there is balance and harmony with the organization's goals and mission. The elements of a good organizational culture are mission, respect, solid communication, and superior performance. An organization's culture will affect the success of a project either positively or negatively. If the organization's mission is not clear the employees will not understand why a specific project is being implemented, which might lead to resistance. Having a solid communication culture in an organization will ensure that the project manager is able to communicate to the employees in regards to the project, which will ensure that all employees understand and those who do not can ask questions freely. For a successful project, there should be respect among the employees. This will allow the employees to respect each other during the project implementation and management. What are some of the key organizational elements that can affect the development and maintenance of a supportive organizational culture? As a consultant, what advice would you give to a functional organization that was seeking to move from an old, adversarial culture, where the various departments actively resisted helping one another, to one that encourages project thinking and cross-functional cooperation? The key elements that would affect an organization's supportive culture are respect, communication, and clear mission. These three elements will affect how the employees interact and value with each other. In order for an organization to change its culture to one that departments support each other, it will need to clearly define its mission, change its communication methods, and develop a culture of respect amongst the various departments. A clear mission will define what the organization would want to accomplish and how it intends to accomplish it, which will allow the departments to better understand the organization. Open lines of communication from the top managers will ensure that employees…

Pages: 4  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Management Principles Management Leadership Model

There is a pre-assumption that the leader's traits existed before leadership and most of them failed to approach the study of personality. Several studies aiming at identifying some of the leadership traits reveal that most of the traits were unimportant compared to other traits (Dereli, 2007). In this context, some scholars have argued that the failure to outline leadership traits…

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Performance Management at the NIM

The death stage refers to the end stage where organizational performance decline to the extent of inability to maintain its normal productivity and market competitiveness. On the other hand, entrepreneurial stage is characterized by the need for effective leadership, collectivity (delegation), formalization (beginning of organizational decline in productivity) and elaboration stage requires organizational revitalization (Hopkins, Hopkins, & Mallette, 2005). From the case study, it seems that the case excludes the maturity stage and growth stage. The analysis does not consider the growth stages undergone by the campus. The analysis also does not consider the maturity stage of the organization. This has significant impacts on the performance and the growth of the company. Growth stage provides management of the campus with insights into the nature of its current and future performance. It provides the basis for developing the desired strategies for exploiting the prevailing opportunities. They are also essential in evaluating strategies required when respond to anticipatory challenges that may hinder the growth and development of the campus. On the other hand, the maturity stage enables organizations to evaluate their stability and competitiveness in the marketplace. It provides organizations with theoretical approaches required for understanding and identifying new opportunities prevailing in the marketplace (Hopkins, Hopkins, & Mallette, 2005). In addition, the stage allows the management team to determine the efficacy of their actions and predict the future outcomes of their strategic plans. The other impact associated with the exclusion stage includes the failure to evaluate its market share and effective market segmentation to allow effective exploitation of the target market. Conclusively, designing a strategic plan in an organization requires active participation of all the stakeholders to ensure its success. References Hopkins, W.E., Hopkins, S.A., & Mallette, P. (2005). Aligning organizational subcultures for competitive advantage: A strategic change approach. New York: Basic Books. Nambudiri R. & Jayasima J. (2008). Performance Management at the National Institute of Management (Central India……

Pages: 6  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 1


Organizational Behavior and Management Concepts Organizational Behavior

Organizational Behavior and Management Concepts Organizational Behavior Defined Generally, organizational behavior refers to the study of behavior patterns within professional business (and other) organizations (George & Jones, 2008; NAU, 2010; Robbins & Judge, 2009). It consists of three principal areas of analysis: the study of individual behavior, the study of individual behavior within a group, and the study of interrelations between and among different groups of individuals (NAU, 2010). Despite the substantial differences in the specific focus of each of those areas, all aspects of the study of organizational behavior serves the same essential purpose: to apply the knowledge gained to improve the efficiency, effectiveness, and profitability of professional business (and other) organizations (NAU, 2010). Additionally, the understanding of organizational behavior principles and practices can also be applied for the benefit of the individuals within the organizations (George & Jones, 2008; Robbins & Judge, 2009). Components of Organizational Behavior There are major distinctions within the study of organizational behavior, such as those pertaining to the respective realms of organizational effectiveness, process efficiency, personnel performance, and human motivation (George & Jones, 2008; Robbins & Judge, 2009). The roots of modern concepts of organizational effectiveness date back to the work of early industrial organization theorists such as Frederick Taylor and Henri Fayol in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Taylor, in particular, is considered the father of scientific business management because of the way he applied quantitative analyses to business processes. That approach involved, for one example, determining the optimal makeup of working groups and the ideal size of shovels for the most productive possible output……

Pages: 2  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 3


Management Agree With the Statement "Organizations Will

Management agree with the statement "organizations will not learn effectively until they recognize and confront the implications of the three occupational cultures." There are several reasons for agreeing with the statements. First according to Schein, organizational learning failures are caused not by resistance to change or human nature but the inability of people of different cultures to come together and communicate through the shared language. The people belonging to the three cultures have different understanding of the same subject that often creates the probability of the failure of organizational culture. As Schein argues that, the first kind of culture-- the operational culture-- is the culture of every day activities that is carried by the line managers. These managers deal with day to-day routine activities in the organization and their main job is get products and services out in the markets, purchase supplies, process supplies and pack the products for the delivery. This kind of culture involves operational people who like to work in teams and solve complex analytical problems in the organization. These people try to work collaboratively as a team; however, all of the members of their teams are of the similar outlooks, professions, and understanding. They tend to believe and trust each other for compensating the flaws in technology. The second kind of culture belongs to executives, who Deal with capital, resources, and other vital means of production. People at these level control most of the organizational resources and they support learning and human potential, their main responsibility, however, lies looking at the bottom line of the organization for its survival. The people belonging to the executive culture remain far from the operational people and……

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Hight Performance Management

High Performance Management Accomplishing Organizational Goals according Total Quality Management Given the importance of effective management in any type of organization today, the recent attention paid to management initiatives such as the ISO 9000 series and the total quality movement approach embody a single primary component: the producers of products and services must achieve the highest attainable quality; in fact, nothing short of this less will succeed in an increasingly globalized and competitive environment. Consequently, the two past few years have witnessed the rise of a philosophy that has been aimed at maximizing organizational quality. The use of existing world standards for quality control, such as the standards in the ISO 9000 series, can provide almost any type of organizations with the tools it requires to achieve these goals, but there are some constraints to the process that must be resolved before the maximum benefits of such approaches can be realized. These comprehensive and extensive standards are characterized by fundamental differences in product categories and sectors, but all of these provide important general quality control principles for all types of products and services today. Without a doubt, the current trend toward making do with less to accomplish more is clear, and ISO 9000 quality systems standards or their equivalent have been adopted in more than 90 countries as national standards. In this regard, compliance with the comprehensive ISO 9000 standards has become less obligatory for businesses that want sell medical devices or telecommunications equipment in Europe, where more than 20,000 companies are registered. In the U.S., suppliers to the electrical, chemical, and nuclear industries are anticipating certification has also become mandatory (Barnes, 1998). Furthermore, managers have not been isolated from these trends and the number of ISO 9000 registrations is doubling every nine to 12 months in the U.S., from 100 in 1990 to 4000 in 1994 (Barnes, 1998). Despite these trends, it is important for managers at every level to recognize that successful TQM outcomes make it possible to more efficiently use an organization's resources by ensuring the optimal allocation of tasks, processes, and responsibilities within the concept of accountability. Consequently, every aspect of the business's operation that serves to contribute to quality within the organization is differentiated, and to the extent possible, improved. To accomplish this broad goal, a TQM system can apply a company's resources to operate in union with improved efficiency in satisfying customer needs and…

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Human Resource Management for Employee

They also promote and reward current employees for assisting in the recruitment of friends and acquaintances, largely because they realize that the friends of existing employees are more likely to share the same values and mindsets of employees who are happy at work and successful in their positions that will make them compatible with the organizational culture (Leader-Chivee, Hamilton, &…

Pages: 5  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4


Formation Organizations Factors Influencing the

All the cases and procedures are studied, measured, and quantified according to the confirmations of the technique used. Besides, the usability of the design item, and the longevity of the system in order to have a genuine organization formation process are also tested. Moreover, quantification responded to the nature and effectiveness of the methods and procedures involved in designing the…

Pages: 15  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 15


Managing the Total Quality Management

As the rate of transformation in the business environment goes faster, suppleness, feasible all the way through CIM, turns out to be an important element for a triumphant venture. Operational Problem Existing Operational Problem: major problem is the organization today is the lack of quality and experience on the part of the employees. Analysis: This problem basically crops up because the necessary topics vital to supervise people are not resolved by the leadership management. These topics are empowerment, conflict resolution, team building, etc. Recommendations a) Recruitment of part-time employees to enhance inward competition. A b) Upgrading of employees at Company's Coaching Centre. A c) Develop effective communication with the employees. A d) Constant Orientation from the part of the management. Business Proposal and Recommendation Managers of TQM should possess competent and true professional management skills. The management should engage in written and verbal communications in such a manner that institutes them as experts in the industry; as well as, they should present themselves on a level that anyone of any status should be able to understand and interpret. They should recognize that each and every client and individual allied with our business is equal in substance and is worthy of the same level of importance and service regardless of how great or small the project might be. It should be especially pointed out that the management should believe in quality and not quantity, therefore they should be very comprehensive with their approach. Furthermore, they should possess workforce with excellent personalized skills. Furthermore, the management should always be truthful, and present the facts for what they really are. It should avoid stretching the truth at all cost. It should follow sound ethical and moral guiding principles in managing all cycles of business, and present itself with a level of integrity that is second to none. References Aly, Nael A. (March 1989). A Survey on the Use of Computer-Integrated Manufacturing In Food Processing Companies, Food Technology: 82-87. Blest, John P., (Spring 1992). Raymond G. Hunt and Carolyn C. Shadle, Action Teams in the Total Quality Process: Experience in a Job Shop, National Productivity Review: 195-202. Camp, Robert C., (1989). Competitive Bench Marking: Xerox's Powerful Quality tool is making Total Quality Happen, Research Report, The Conference Board. 35-42. Chang, Tien-Chien and Richard A. Wysk, (1985). An Introduction to Automated Process Planning System, Prentice Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. DeMeyer, Arnoud, (1990). How…

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Tipping Point for Talent Management

Tipping Point for Talent Management The economic environment and the need for talent management practices The modern day economic environment is the result of numerous processes of change. The end result is a complex economic climate characterized by varying degrees of governmental intervention, the promotion of markets regulated by demand and supply or by liberalization and globalization. All these economic elements -- as well as several others more -- have generated a new need for talent management practices. Examples in this sense include: The access to information led to the creation of more pretentious customers The more pretentious customers demanded high quality products and services, which could only be offered through talented staff members At a global level, a trend is observed of GDP generation from services more in the detriment of industry and agriculture (Central Intelligence Agency, 2010). But services can only satisfy the customers when they are delivered by high skilled staff members. As a final specification, it should be noted that, unlike an initial perception, the emergence of the internationalized economic crisis has not halted talent management practices, but it has in fact created new grounds for their implementation. To better explain, a major mistake of most economic agents is that of striving to deal with the crisis by downsizing. Combining the downsized employees with the individuals who lost their jobs due to organizational bankruptcies, the availability of labor force significantly increases. In this context, organizational leaders are presented with the opportunity of accessing talented individuals who would otherwise be unattainable (HR Malaysia, 2009). 2. Globalization and the tipping point of talent management practices The forces of globalization have represented one of the primary generators of enhanced talent management practices. Globalization opened national boundaries and allowed economic, political, technological and otherwise values and practices to transcend boundaries. A direct impact of the opening of boundaries was an increased organizational access to foreign resources, including capitals, technologies, commodities, but also labor force. Several organizations engaged in processes of outsourcing by which they took work outside one country to have it completed within a more cost effective region. But the labor force in the cost effective country was seldom trained and able to perform the tasks at high quality standards. The need for talent management rose both from the necessity to train the foreign workers, as well as from the need to adequately manage them. The second means in…

Pages: 4  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 4


Knowledge Management Social Network Analysis Remains Relevant

Knowledge Management Social network analysis remains relevant to the contemporary social networking process. The mechanisms for social networking may have changed, potentially adding layers of complexity, but the underlying concept remains the same. The quality of one's social network and the abilities of that network are, if anything, easier to identify with modern technology. The chapters can be updated by…

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