Being Canadian Is Being BritishEssay

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[. . .] That allowed them some of the freedoms they wanted. They also had to make some concessions. While that harmed the spirit of nationalism a bit, politicians still pushed forward with the idea that Canada did not need to be involved with the British any longer. Over time, more people began to agree with that.

From the Indian point-of-view, the 1885 uprising was very different from the way it was portrayed by most Canadians.

However, most of the Metis and others who associated with them only told parts of the story. It made many of them sad, but they also did not want to get others in their group into trouble for their part in the conflict.

Rather than speak out, they told bits and pieces of the story around campfires at night, and mostly kept the significant parts to themselves. They feared punishment and retribution that could come from too much information being given to those who were not a part of their tribe.

That was one way that showed just how far away from true nationalism some of Canada was. While the French and English moved on to work together, indigenous people were often left behind.

One of the people who thought he understood how to make Canada a true nation was Henri Bourassa.

He had grand ideas, but did not always carry them out very well. He would put his support behind one party, and when it did not do well he would transfer that support to another candidate.

Eventually, he ended up supporting the candidate with the most imperialist views, which went completely against what he said he was going to offer to the people of Canada.

While he thought he had good ideas, and those ideas made sense to him, he only managed to make relations between French and English Canadians more bitter.

Naturally, that was not his goal, and it lowered his ability to have influence in the country or get anything done to help the nation.

A number of great ideas were offered to make Canada truly national, but most of them did not get very far. They were either voted down in the polls, or they did not have enough political backing to push a candidate forward. Both of those were upsetting for the people who wanted to see Canada move away from British rule. Tensions continued to mount right up until WWI started. Once the war began, Canada was forced to choose sides more strongly. That was the push the country needed to become more independent and focus on its own needs and goals. There are still many British and French influences in Canada, but it rules itself and is a true nation of its own. It is never easy to make a new nation, and it can often take a long time and many struggles. If it is wanted enough, though, it will happen. Now that Canada has been its own nation for a long period of time, very few people associate it with Britain or British rule. Today, to be Canadian is not to be British, but only to be a part of Canada, as its own independent nation.

References

Berger, C. (2006). "Imperialism and nationalism, 1884 to 1914: A conflict in Canadian thought." In R.D. Francis & D.B. Smith, eds. Readings in Canadian history: Post-confederation, (7th. ed.). Canada: Nelson-Thomson Learning.

Brown, C. (2006). "The nationalism of the national policy." In R.D. Francis & D.B. Smith, eds. Readings in Canadian history: Post-confederation, (7th. ed.). Canada: Nelson-Thomson Learning.

Lee, D. (2006). "The Metis militant rebels of 1885." In R.D. Francis & D.B. Smith, eds. Readings in Canadian history: Post-confederation, (7th. ed.). Canada: Nelson-Thomson Learning.

Levitt, J. (2006). "Henri Bourassa on imperialism and biculturalism, 1900-1918." In R.D. Francis & D.B. Smith, eds. Readings in Canadian history: Post-confederation, (7th. ed.). Canada: Nelson-Thomson Learning.

Stonechild, A.B. (2006). "The Indian view of the 1885 uprising." In R.D. Francis & D.B. Smith, eds. Readings in Canadian history: Post-confederation, (7th. ed.). Canada: Nelson-Thomson Learning.

Berger, 2006; 112.

Ibid; 112

Ibid; 113.

Brown, 2006; 24.

Ibid; 25.

Ibid; 25.

Brown, 2006; 25.… [END OF PREVIEW]

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