Term Paper: Believability in Business Research as John Kmetz

Pages: 5 (1304 words)  ·  Style: MLA  ·  Bibliography Sources: 4  ·  Topic: Literature  ·  Buy for $19.77

Believability in Business Research

As John Kmetz implies, the information explosion and concomitant technological developments have had widespread implications for believability in research. Research has become both easier and more difficult as a result of the Internet. While many sources are more easily accessible, the fact that Internet publication has become widely accessible to the public often makes it difficult to find serious, valid research resources. The question of truth has therefore become central to research in any field. The result of this in turn is that an increasing amount of literature addresses the issue of validity and 'truth' in research. In addressing this issue, it is also important to consider how important the truth issue is in research. After all, research itself is focused upon studying questions and uncertainties rather than answers. Furthermore, the research findings of yesterday are more often than not either proved untrue by current research, or indeed become the questions as a result of new findings. Perhaps then the question is rather appropriateness than truth. These issues are addressed, as mentioned, by various authors, two of which include John Kmetz and Tony Oulton. Their different approaches to assessing research sources provide the researcher with valuable insight into the process of finding and selecting the most appropriate research sources in the management field.

Kmetz emphasizes that there are several fields in the management, each with its targeted literature. The important focus here is therefore to find the source that is most appropriate for the field and purpose of research. In this, five different categories are addressed, with a consideration of the strengths and weaknesses of each. Each source also has a different level of believability according to its nature and target audience.

The first category is the popular press. Kmetz includes Internet sources in this category. The major strength of this category is that it provides the reader with the most current information regarding a topic. While many have derided the Internet for its lack of credible sources, the author mentions that those sources targeted towards academic specialties such as management tend to be based upon accurate and credible reporting. In terms of believability however, the reader should distinguish between those sources whose sole purpose is to provide information and those also advocating their particular cause. Regardless of its role, the writing for popular publications is done in a very readable manner, and is therefore easy to understand and use for research purposes.

More than a possible lack of credibility in the information provided by the popular press, is its currency. The level of currency in the popular press makes for incomplete or fragmentary information. While therefore not lacking in believability as such, believability is indeed hampered by the incompleteness of the data, and the fact that the currency of the data may reflect bias. Nevertheless, this does not mean that the information provided is as such untrue.

The second source type identified by the author is practitioner books and compendia. These are popular books in the field of management. According to the author, assessing the truth of these is difficult, as there is such a wide variety of these sources.

Academic journals, books and compendia provide the researcher with greater scientific rigor than the popular press, while also being more consistent in the validity of their content than popular books. The availability of academic books and compendia may however be somewhat limited. In terms of the truth in research, these sources are therefore of the highest quality, although somewhat academic in language and expression. Academic literature tends to be conservative in terms of currency and position, but nonetheless is the most trustworthy in terms of truth.

The author suggests various ways of interpreting the above types of management literature in order to determine its level of truth and usefulness. The first evaluation criteria are time and timeliness. The author makes the point that timeliness is jeopardized by… [END OF PREVIEW]

Business Research Purpose Research Proposal


Business Research Analysis Case Study


Business Research Many Research Firms Consider Social Research Proposal


Business Research Process the Importance of Timely Term Paper


Business Memo John Carlisle, CEO Attn: Plant Essay


View 1,000+ other related papers  >>

Cite This Term Paper:

APA Format

Believability in Business Research as John Kmetz.  (2007, August 1).  Retrieved November 19, 2019, from https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/believability-business-research-john/782618

MLA Format

"Believability in Business Research as John Kmetz."  1 August 2007.  Web.  19 November 2019. <https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/believability-business-research-john/782618>.

Chicago Format

"Believability in Business Research as John Kmetz."  Essaytown.com.  August 1, 2007.  Accessed November 19, 2019.
https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/believability-business-research-john/782618.