Term Paper: Bullying - A True Story

Pages: 3 (1496 words)  ·  Bibliography Sources: 1  ·  Level: College Senior  ·  Topic: Children  ·  Buy This Paper

SAMPLE EXCERPT:

[. . .] A also emphasized that telling an adult about bullying is not the same as tattling. "Faith, for bullying to be stopped, you have to go to your teacher, principal, or an adult who is in charge. If someone doesn't know, then she can't help."

But the bullying did not stop. Each day I saw Faith's hurt and depression grow. I reached a point when I could not stand the pain in her eyes anymore. I was angry that my child was being bullied from her classmates. Who did they think they were to call her names!

A approached the principal. Actually, I stormed into the school demanding that the name-calling stop immediately. He promised the bullying would stop. He said, "Faith, if someone bullies you, tell the teacher or come tell me." I left feeling the situation would get better; however, it did not. My temper outburst had embarrassed my daughter. She did not want to tell me anything that was happening at school. She was afraid I would blow up again.

I knew it was important for me to try to keep my cool, but it was hard for me to do.

The bullying continued. The second time I went to the principal, he said, "Your daughter acts out and wants negative attention. No one is bullying her and if they are, she is provoking them. Mostly, I think she is making these allegations up, perhaps to get attention from you." knew if my daughter said she was being bullied, she was. I needed to do something to solve the problem, but what? I started keeping a diary of different episodes at school when my child or a friend of hers discussed them.

Finally, Faith and I went to the superintendent. The three of us discussed the situation at school. He said, "Faith, if someone calls you names, tell the teacher or the principal. I will call and talk to the principal about the situation. No child should suffer the way you are."

Surely, this would stop the constant name-calling and teasing. My nerves were shattered from the constant battle with the school and my daughter. I developed hatred toward the students at her school. As a Christian, I knew these feelings were wrong, but the hatred grew. At times I felt like letting my daughter quit school; however, that was not a legal option. And education was important to us.

One night my husband went downstairs to get some water and unexpectedly caught Faith reaching for his bottle of high blood pressure medicine. He asked, "What are you doing with my medicine?" Faith broke down and started crying. She admitted she had suicidal thoughts.

Our family sought a Christian counselor. All of us were being affected in one way or another. As a mother, I experienced stress from watching my daughter's unhappiness. Often I felt angry, confused, and guilty. What had I done wrong as a parent? I asked myself. The bullying caused my daughter to suffer with low self-esteem, anger, and stress.

The counselor worked with my daughter to learn ways to be assertive. Role-play was a vital part of their counseling sessions. Communication as a family became an important focus during this time. We practiced active listening and keeping an open mind. Recognizing her feelings as real and acceptable was a part of our counseling sessions. The counselor also helped me to work with my anger toward the school.

At the counselor's suggestion, we decided to look for another school, one that practiced a zero tolerance policy for bullying. A neighboring school had a no-bullying policy in force. The school superintendent met with Faith and me. We discussed the problems she had with the other school.

The superintendent said, "No one deserves to be bullied. Every child has a right to be safe at school. Faith, if someone bullies you, tell the teacher. If that doesn't work, tell the principal. If you find it necessary to come see me, I guarantee the problem will end."

Faith recently finished the eighth grade and is looking forward to another year of school there. She has friends who know the meaning of friendship.

As a parent, I learned bullying is not a laughing matter. Now, if my child is bullied, I will seek help with the teachers and principals

Works Cited

Moore, Jeannie. "Bullying -- One Mom's Frustrations" Woman Touch Website. http://www.ag.org/womanstouch/2002_07-08/bllyngonemom.cfm [END OF PREVIEW]

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Bullying - A True Story.  (2002, June 16).  Retrieved October 16, 2019, from https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/bullying-true-story/2339166

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