China Essay

Pages: 4 (1424 words)  ·  Bibliography Sources: 4  ·  File: .docx  ·  Level: College Senior  ·  Topic: Economics

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[. . .] Still, the government recognizes the necessity of addressing this problem as soon as possible. In this spirit, a number of solutions are being worked on. One of these, according to The New Agriculturist (2004), is a water diversion scheme, which would link the south, where there is a large amount of water, to the north, where there is a shortage. This involves canals, which will also bring water form the Yangtze River to the Yellow River, which is slowly but surely drying up.

China's current policy is a recognition that Yuan will have to rise against the dollar in order to remain a sustainable player in the global market (Barr, 2010). The country has shown itself willing to enter into negotiations to find common grounds to address the issue of its currency.

Policies that are currently in place include heavy penalties for smuggling or using drugs. According to Beech (2006), for example, trafficking only 50 grams can mean the death penalty in China. This initiative, however, has only driven the problem further underground. The money to be gained from drug trafficking simply presents too great a lure for some, especially those who are desperate. Although police are officially charged with curbing the drug habit, the extreme violence of those in the trade tends to frighten them into turning a blind eye. Those who remain committed to their duties are so few in number that they cannot handle the problem.

Although the policies that are in place to divert water to the north and into the Yellow River, authorities need to keep in mind that the cost is high, not only in terms of money, but also in terms of the environment. It is important to take into account wider environmental issues such as the loss of farmland and the displacement of people as the project is being worked on. When addressing the issue of water, it is therefore important to understand that the causes of the shortage cannot only be addressed by proving more water to areas where water is scarce. This is not sustainable, since simply pouring more water into an area where water usage is already wasteful and unsustainable will simply create the same long-term problem. Instead, it is recommended that some funding be used towards the upgrade of farming practices, as this is where most of the water is lost.

To handle the currency problem, several recommendations have been made, including calls for China to increase consumer spending (Barr, 2010). As with the water problem, an important concern here is a wider focus to make sure that the country can maintain its economic strength and trading practice. This is why it is also important to take into account the effect that consumers and individuals have on the economy and its sustainability. Barr (2010) points out that, even if the Yuan gains strength, this is hardly enough to ensure that the economy remains strong, since consumers are the lifeblood of the economy.

China's drug problem is made worse by frightened law enforcement officials and the inability of rehabilitation centers to care for those who enter them. These strategies are therefore not working. Instead, the root problems should be addressed. These include the poverty level in rural areas and education. Policies should be put in place to empower the poor and to educate the young. In both cases, education can provide the key to better national and individual health.

In conclusion, three major problems that China faces is the sustainability of its water supply, its economy, and the effects of drugs, specifically on its young people. One important way to address these issues is education. People who are educated can free themselves from any trap and work together to not only help themselves, but possibly others as well. (Gerth, 2011)

References

Barr, C. (2010, March 22). Enough about the Yuan already. CNNMoney. Retrieved from: http://money.cnn.com/2010/03/22/news/economy/china.tension.fortune/index.htm

Beech, H. (2006). Chinese Junk. Time Inc. Retrieved from: http://www.time.com/time/asia/covers/1101020520/cover.html

Gerth, K. (2011, January 1). Can China Save the World, Twice? World News. Retrieved from: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2011/01/01/chinas-environmental-problems-and-economic-growth.html

The New Agriculturist. (2004, September) China's Water Problems. Retrieved from: http://www.new-ag.info/en/focus/focusItem.php?a=1302 [END OF PREVIEW]

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https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/china-still-regarded/9178463.