Article Critique: Computer Systems

Pages: 8 (2506 words)  ·  Bibliography Sources: 8  ·  Level: Master's  ·  Topic: Education - Computers  ·  Buy This Paper

SAMPLE EXCERPT:

[. . .] The realization that intrusion detection has a number of false positives is a significant one (Bace, 2000; Coit, Staniford, & McAlerney, 2001). Until that was realized, there was little advancement in the way intrusion detection worked or how it was changed or adjusted. In short, the technology was "stuck" in that particular area, with little advancement seen (Haines, et al., 2001). Fortunately, with studies and articles like the one critiqued here, it is easy to see the proper and valuable advancement of technology.

The limitations of the study are small, as are the weaknesses. The most significant of the issues in that capacity revolve around the understanding that it is not possible to really compare NIDS with one another (Bace, 2000). That can make the study less conclusive in that it is possible to show the value of context when it comes to NIDS, but it is not possible to compare one style of contextual advancement to another to see how they measure up where value is concerned (Haines, et al., 2001). Despite this, however, the value of what was done in the study is very important to the overall quality of NIDS that is seen in computing applications today, and can provide companies and individuals with a higher level of security and a lower level of false positives.

The study could be improved if there were better ways to compare NIDS, because that would provide another benchmark to study. As it stands, however, that is not possible, and the study feels very complete in its present form. It compares well with other papers and articles that have been read, because it focuses on more than writing about the problem. Many studies address problems, but they do not all find clear solutions -- or even suggested solutions -- to those problems. In some cases this is because solutions are not possible, or because there are too many variables that would have to be considered in order to determine whether a solution would be viable. In other cases, the authors are not focused on exploring how to fix the problems they have detailed in their study, and that can lead to frustration for the reader who wants to know what can be done about the problem.

This paper is strengthened by other studies that verify the lack of viability in comparing NIDS with one another (Coit, Staniford, & McAlerney, 2001). The inability to compare these in an significant way is frustrating, but it is not something the authors of the paper can control. They are limited by what is realistic in their chosen field, and that does not include being able to take one form or application of NIDS and compare it across the board with another one. Instead, the authors of the paper have to focus their efforts on the changes they have made and whether those changes are successful in improving the situation for people and companies that need NIDS protection.

There are several pieces of information in the article's bibliography that provide a great deal of knowledge about the subject at hand, and that provide it in such a way as to be easily understood. These include:

Bace, R.G. (2000). Intrusion Detection. Macmillan Technical Publishing, Indianapolis, IN, USA.

Coit,, C.J., Staniford, S., & McAlerney, J. (2001). Towards Faster Pattern Matching for Intrusion Detection or Exceeding the Speed of Snort. In Proc. 2nd DARPA Information Survivability Conference and Exposition.

Haines, J., Rossey, L, Lippmann, R., & Cunningham, R. (2001). Extending the 1999 Evaluation. In Proc. 2nd DARPA Information Survivability Conference and Exposition.

Discussion and Conclusion

The article, overall, provides a great deal of strong, valuable information on intrusion detection and how it can be improved. It is only logical that adding more context to the NIDS system would provide a better rate of accurate return. Of course, false positives are not as serious as false negatives, because it is still not allowing attacks and hacks to go through. False negatives would mean that hackers were getting into the system, which would naturally be a serious consideration for any company dealing with that issue, and also for the end users whose information could be put at risk. However, false positives are still a poor choice because they can prevent access to needed and desired information.

While it is important to protect people, those same people must also be able to access what they need. That is why articles like this provide so much value -- because they reduce the occurrence of false positives without compromising any form of safety for everyone involved. They also provide a basis off of which others can work, so more options for protecting the Web and avoiding false positives can be created. The context in which the authors are working may need to be adjusted in order to provide maximum effectiveness, but that does not mean that what they have already created does not have strong merit for their field of study.

References

Bace, R.G. (2000). Intrusion Detection. Macmillan Technical Publishing, Indianapolis, IN, USA.

Coit,, C.J., Staniford, S., & McAlerney, J. (2001). Towards Faster Pattern Matching for Intrusion Detection or Exceeding the Speed of Snort. In Proc. 2nd DARPA Information Survivability Conference and Exposition.

Dean, D., Felten, E.W., & Wallach, D.S. (1996). Java security: From HotJava to Netscape and beyond. In IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy.

Gajek, S., Schwenk, J., & Xuan, C. (2008). On the insecurity of Microsoft's identity metasystem. Tech. Rep. HGI-TR-2008-003, Horst Gortz Institute for IT Security, Ruhr University Bochum.

Haines, J., Rossey, L, Lippmann, R., & Cunningham, R. (2001). Extending the 1999 Evaluation. In Proc. 2nd DARPA Information Survivability Conference and Exposition.

Jackson, C., Barth, A., Bortz, A., Shao, W., & Boneh, D., (2009). Protecting browsers from DNS rebinding attacks. ACM Transactions on the Web, 3(1): 1-26.

Karlof, C.K., Shankar, U., Tygar, D., & Wagner, D. (2007). Dynamic pharming attacks and the locked same-origin policies for Web browsers. In Proceedings of the ACM… [END OF PREVIEW]

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"Computer Systems."  Essaytown.com.  April 5, 2014.  Accessed March 22, 2019.
https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/computer-systems-used-one/1750370.