Crime and Intelligence Analysis Term Paper

Pages: 8 (2870 words)  ·  Bibliography Sources: 10  ·  File: .docx  ·  Topic: Criminal Justice

SAMPLE EXCERPT . . .
Whereas the crime analyst went well with the policing department, the intelligence analyst goes well with the homeland security ideas. This is because a crime analyst usually serves in a more local capacity, whereas the intelligence analyst, as seen from the definitions above, is most likely to serve in a national and international capacity. For this reason, this role will be analyzed further below.

There are varying opinions on what makes up the analytic or intelligence community today, especially at high governmental levels. The reason for this is that this community is built upon many strata of more inferior positions, but all of which supply the individual with valuable information in order to carry out the task of gathering intelligence and utilizing it for the safety of the homeland. Some make the point that not policy can fit all situations, and that the State Department must specifically set out mandates for different organizations that can enable them to react differently to situations, in order for best outcomes to surface in times of need.

Others yet state that the most important facet of intelligence analysis, at present, is to evaluate potential threats, no matter what the situation is, and to find a way to solve them by looking at previously set guidelines, even if they do not pertain to a similar situation. However plausible this latter explanation, few advocate the 'one size fits all' model.Buy full Download Microsoft Word File paper
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Term Paper on Crime and Intelligence Analysis the Assignment

The more interesting aspect of intelligence analysis, since much of that relating to homeland security as defined above is relatively new, is regarding its future, which holds much promise for this field. For instance, many state that although intelligence analysis has been in existence for as long as the nations has stood, the more recent experience of the September 11 attacks has completely reshaped this outlook. The "U.S. experience with foreign intelligence indicates that the roles and missions of the federal government's new domestic intelligence capabilities will likely increase in the future. The study of foreign intelligence provides a valuable vantage point from which to observe and critique the burgeoning federal domestic surveillance system, because the new domestic intelligence programs appear to approximate a domestic version of the longstanding foreign intelligence capabilities […] Since the 11 September 2001 attacks, the federal government has proposed and implemented numerous new domestic intelligence programs to bolster its counter-terrorism capabilities. These domestic intelligence programs run the gamut from increased aerial surveillance to increased wiretap authority to the creation of passive surveillance systems to detect the presence of nuclear, chemical, or biological agents."

This analysis is very important, for it stresses the role of the Department of Homeland Security in the future well-being of the nation, and also addresses the importance of continued work in this field in the future.

Most researchers thus agree with this outlook, presented above. These individuals state that the present "offers a rare opportunity for implementing significant changes to improve the effectiveness of the intelligence enterprise" that can be continued in the future.

Others yet argue that despite the fact that the future of intelligence analysis look bright from all aspects, including the financial one that was holding back crime analysts, there are some obstacles, especially to that level of analysis as promoted by the Department of Homeland Security. Thus, some think that "despite having made real contributions to the sharing of intelligence between the federal government and state and local agencies; since its inception, the office of Intelligence and Analysis (I&A) at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has struggled to find its place in the larger U.S. Intelligence Community (IC)."

One can only wonder if this could truly be an obstacle in the way of this concept, or if it will be simply solved within the department and therefore presents no harm to the intelligence community at large.

Conclusions

The roles of crime and intelligence analysts, at local and national levels, are very important, and should not be overlooked. This paper has undertaken both defining and discussing the past, present and potential, future roles that individuals in these posts could take, with a view to how such roles could impact policing and homeland security. Crime and intelligence analysis have thus been found to have a great impact, and their utilization has been found to be of utmost necessity. It is therefore recommended that in the future, crime analysis remains employed at local level, and intelligence analysis at national, especially as threats always loom both domestically and internationally. For this reason as well, individuals in these roles should be given the resources necessary to carry out their positions, and should utilize both technological advancement, communication and human resources in order to carry out their mandate. It is only in this way that cities across the country, as well as the nation itself, will be kept safe.

References

Boba, Rachel. "Guidelines to Implement and Evaluate Crime Analysis and Mapping in Law Enforcement Agencies." Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS). 2000. Web. 22 Dec. 2011. .

"Chapter One: Definitions." Central Intelligence Agency. 16 Mar. 2007. Web. 22 Dec. 2011. .

Filler, Josh. "The Future of Intelligence at the Department of Homeland Security." Emergency Management. Web. 23 Dec. 2011. .

"Intelligence Analysis Careers at the FBI." Federal Bureau of Investigation. Web. 22 Dec. 2011. .

Lahneman, William. "The Future of Intelligence Analysis: Volume I, Final Report." University of Maryland. 10 Mar. 2006. Web. 22 Dec. 2011. .

Marrin, Stephen. "Homeland Security Intelligence: Just the Beginning." Homeland Security. 18 Mar. 2003. Web. 22 Dec. 2011. .

Osborne, Deborah. "Four Position Papers on the Role of Crime Analyst in Policing." State University of New York. 2001. Web. 22 Dec. 2011. .

"Policing: Definition." The Free Online Dictionary. Web. 22 Dec. 2011. .

Treverton, Gregory and Gabbard, Bryan. "Assessing the Tradecraft of Intelligence Analysis." RAND Corporation. 2008. Web. 22 Dec. 2011. .

"What Is Crime Analysis?" Massachusetts Association of Crime Analysts. Web. 22 Dec. 2011. .

"What Is Crime Analysis?" Massachusetts Association of Crime Analysts. Web. 22 Dec. 2011. .

Massachusetts Association of Crime Analysts, 1.

"Chapter One: Definitions." Central Intelligence Agency. 16 Mar. 2007. Web. 22 Dec. 2011. .

"Intelligence Analysis Careers at the FBI." Federal Bureau of Investigation. Web. 22 Dec. 2011. .

"Policing: Definition." The Free Online Dictionary. Web. 22 Dec. 2011. .

Osborne, Deborah. "Four Position Papers on the Role of Crime Analyst in Policing." State University of New York. 2001. Web. 22 Dec. 2011. .

Osborne, 1.

Osborne, 1.

Osborne, 1.

Boba, Rachel. "Guidelines to Implement and Evaluate Crime Analysis and Mapping in Law Enforcement Agencies." Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS). 2000. Web. 22 Dec. 2011. .

Treverton, Gregory and Gabbard, Bryan. "Assessing the Tradecraft of Intelligence Analysis." RAND Corporation. 2008. Web. 22 Dec. 2011. .

Marrin, Stephen. "Homeland Security Intelligence: Just the Beginning." Homeland Security. 18 Mar. 2003. Web. 22 Dec. 2011. .

Lahneman, William. "The Future of Intelligence Analysis: Volume I, Final Report." University of Maryland. 10 Mar. 2006. Web. 22 Dec. 2011. .

Filler, Josh. "The Future of Intelligence at the Department of Homeland Security." Emergency Management. Web. 23 Dec. 2011. . [END OF PREVIEW] . . . READ MORE

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