Research Paper: Discrimination Against High-Risk Sex Offenders

Pages: 27 (7425 words)  ·  Style: APA  ·  Bibliography Sources: 15  ·  Level: College Senior  ·  Topic: Sociology  ·  Buy This Paper

Discrimination Against High Risk Sex Offenders

Even when denoting truly violent offenders, demonization of any class of individual as being beyond redemption and/or devoid of humanity proves not only destructive, but wrong.

Contemporary laws, albeit, routinely brand any transgressor of under-age sex rules as a "sexual predator," even when no violence or force is alleged, and even if the young person is an only a few days from the age of consent. Most sexual contact between adults and minors occurs among family and friends. Without doubt, however, children deserve to be protected from sexual abuser...period. Not acknowledging sexual predators are also human, however, stigmatizes these individuals amdcontinues to cover of the roots of such crimes. These type negative actions also hinder/prevent individuals, previously branded as sexual offenders, from successful re-integrating into society when they are rehabilitated. This type of Discrimination, along with signaling a breakdown in civil society, contributes to further disparaging and detrimental divisions in society. The proposed Capstone, a qualitative research study, will utilize the case study research design to examine factors contributing to possible discrimination against high risk sex offenders by police and society. Along with exploring a myriad of literature, retrieved through the literature review, the researcher plans to create and conduct a survey of both high risk sex offenders, and police officers.

Possible Discrimination against High Risk Sex Offenders

CHAPTER I

Introduction

Dehumanizing Sex Offenders

In "Nothing more vile than sex offenders,'" Lori Rackl and Chris Fusco (2005) cite Illinois Governor Blagojevich to demonize sex offenders, stating: "There's nothing more vile than sex offenders. We have to do everything in our power to keep them away from our children and our communities" (Blagojevich, as cited in Rackl and Fusco, ¶ 3). Even when denoting truly violent offenders, however, demonization of any class of individuals, purporting them as being beyond redemption and/or devoid of humanity, according to Suarez-Potts et al. (1998) in "A call to safeguard our children and our liberties," proves not only destructive, but - wrong.

In light of current challenging perceptions relating to high risk sex offenders, the proposed study contends that consequences of demonizing high risk sex offenders, which may lead to police failing to respond in a timely manner to the need/s of sex offenders in police and societal interactions, constitute possible discrimination against these individuals. Possible discrimination against high risk sex offenders, something not routinely addressed, in fact a practice frequently denied, constitutes a viable concern. Although true sexual abuse must not be tolerated, and not only be spoken out against, but also exposed, with sex offenders held accountable for their crimes, contemporary laws currently "brand any transgressor of under-age sex rules as a 'sexual predator,' even when no violence or force is alleged, and even when the young person is a month or a day shy of the legal age of consent" (Suarez-Potts et al., ¶ 1).

Non-sexual violence and murder of children, according to Suarez-Potts, et al. (1998), is as pervasive as sexual violence, however, most child abuse, does not relate to sex, and is too often kept concealed within families and communities. Despite the fact that physical abuse, malnutrition, poverty, and inadequate health care, along with a myriad of other forms of abuse, threaten millions of young people in the United States, no national commitment exists to stop these deadly, pervasive forms of harm to children. Instead, any case involving sex rivets the attention by society (Suarez-Potts, et al.). What may not be readily recognized, however, is that most sexual abuse between adults and minors occurs among friends and/or family members.

Those friends and/or family members convicted of sex crimes, even after they have served their sentences, no matter what the circumstances, even if they have been rehabilitated, continue to draw an inordinate amount of society's attention, as well as, at times, ongoing punishment for their crimes. What and whom society chooses to punish, along with how severely, according to Amanda C. Pustilnik (2005), Associate, Covington & Buffing, in "Prisons of the mind: Social value and economic inefficiency in the criminal justice response to mental illness" (Kahan, as cited in Pustilnik, 2005, ¶ 1), reflects what or whom a society values. Public response relating to the choice between public health alternatives or criminal confinement for individuals with mental illnesses "indicates that a social value is placed on the criminal confinement of people with mental illnesses" (Pustilnik, 2005, ¶ 1). In addition, individuals with mental illness in criminal confinement are routinely punished more severely; for example, they receive longer sentences, as well as, serve a higher percentage of their sentence than their counterparts who do not struggle with mental illnesses. High risk sex offenders, some of whom are mentally ill, also seem to garner more severe punishment, in and outside criminal confinement, than their counterparts who may have committed other, some even more heinous, crimes.

Without doubt, individuals, particularly children, deserve to be protected from sexual abusers - period. Not acknowledging sexual predators are also human, however, or permanently stigmatizing these individuals does not uncover of the roots of such crimes, nor attribute to decreasing and/or halting their occurrence. Along with signaling a breakdown in civil society, these type negative actions also hinder/prevent individuals, previously branded as sexual offenders, from re-integration into society when they are rehabilitated. Virtual, as well as, possible discrimination against high-risk sex offenders not only constitutes a problem for the individuals being discriminated against, but also for police practicing discrimination, as the practice averts their attention from their duty to serve and protect. Discrimination also adversely affects others in society in the U.S. As individuals who may be truly rehabilitated, and possess the potential to be productive members of society may be alienated from others in their communities due to discrimination, they may also be separated from opportunities to reveal ways to help decrease incidences of sex abuse.

Statement of Problem

The phrase "sex offender" traditionally evokes perceptions of child predators and/or sadistic rapists, beyond redemption and/or devoid of humanity. Consequently, for a number of years, preventing these types of crimes has constituted a vital concern for policymakers at all levels of government, as well as, for police and everyday members in a community. In the quest to prevent sexual offenses, however, police may at times fail to respond in a timely manner to the need/s for assistance of sex offenders, in turn demonizing, and practicing possible discrimination against these individuals. Therefore, the proposed study purports to explore the contemporary double-edge concern relating to possible discrimination by police against high risk sex offenders, along with the potential consequences to high risk sex offenders, police and others in society, and ultimately proffer alternative considerations to more positively address this challenging, contemporary concern.

Hypothesis and Research Question

The information/data analyzed for the proposed Capstone, categorized as a qualitative case study, will evolve from a methodical review of literature; along with data retrieved from a survey the researcher crafts and conducts. During the evolution of the proposed study, the researcher will seek to determine the validity of the following hypothesis:

Hypothesis

The hypothesis for the proposed Capstone project purports: When police fail to respond to the need/s of sex offenders, who have served time for their crime, in a timely manner, and/or individuals in society participate in discriminatory acts such as vigilantism, present counters to re-integration, or enforce "live free from sex offender zones," then the ensuing possible discrimination against sex offenders negatively impacts society as a whole. The following research questions, which serve to help maintain the proposed study's focus, while serving as a foundation for the proposed study, include:

Who are high risk sex offenders?

How do/es some members of society/society discriminate against high risk sex offenders?

What need/s of high risk sex offenders do police sometimes fail to respond to and/or ignore?

How do police and societal interactions with high risk sex offenders affect society as a whole?

Significance of the Study

The researcher's initial interest in possible discrimination against high risk sex offenders evolved during the course of managing these individuals as part of the researcher's every day job functions. In addition, personal experience/s of dealing with sex offenders has afforded the researcher insight as to challenges these individuals must overcome after probation/parole. The knowledge gained during this semester through academic realms further stimulated the researcher's interest and contributed to the researcher choosing this topic for the proposed Capstone study. Along with witnessing others discriminate against high risk sex offenders, the researcher has, on occasion, in non-emergency situations "drug his feet" when responding to calls where the victim was also a sex offender. When the nature of the call proved to be serious, however, the researcher immediately responded. Accounts of discrimination against high risk sex offenders, which stimulated the researcher's determination to further examine factors lending to this contemporary offense, simultaneously fostered the hope of ultimately proffering some positive considerations for police, and others in society. Results from the proposed study, the researcher contends, might be utilized to stimulate consideration of more positive… [END OF PREVIEW]

Four Different Ordering Options:

?
Which Option Should I Choose?

1.  Buy the full, 27-page paper:  $28.88

or

2.  Buy + remove from all search engines
(Google, Yahoo, Bing) for 30 days:  $38.88

or

3.  Access all 175,000+ papers:  $41.97/mo

(Already a member?  Click to download the paper!)

or

4.  Let us write a NEW paper for you!

Ask Us to Write a New Paper
Most popular!

Sex Offenses Term Paper


Illegal Firing Case Study


U.S. Policy Towards Thai Women Sex Trafficking Term Paper


Labor Discrimination Equal Pay Act Law and Reality Thesis


Judicial Discrimination Term Paper


View 234 other related papers  >>

Cite This Research Paper:

APA Format

Discrimination Against High-Risk Sex Offenders.  (2008, December 7).  Retrieved June 18, 2019, from https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/discrimination-against-high-risk-sex/75642

MLA Format

"Discrimination Against High-Risk Sex Offenders."  7 December 2008.  Web.  18 June 2019. <https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/discrimination-against-high-risk-sex/75642>.

Chicago Format

"Discrimination Against High-Risk Sex Offenders."  Essaytown.com.  December 7, 2008.  Accessed June 18, 2019.
https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/discrimination-against-high-risk-sex/75642.