Term Paper: Ethical Challenge Scenarios in Healthcare

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[. . .] She now has to find another job quickly. She can sue, but the possibility of ever receiving any compensation is extremely remote. The ethics of the situation demand that the hiring manager review how people are hired. An offer should never be made until after the entire hiring packet is reviewed. This would have saved the entire problem from happening.

Scenario 2: You are in the final stages of buying land for a new project. Your CEO has been advocating for a purchase on Grand and Broad Street. You have just learned that the CEO, two key physicians and a board member are partners in the land at Grand and Broad. What do you do?

The dilemma is supposedly clearly stated that one person is trusted to find a site on which to build a new project, some people connected with the firm are advocating for a prime site, and the individual making the selection is stuck between choosing the correct site for the project or following the leanings of the boss. This would seem to be a simple case, but it is not. The CEO in this dilemma may have the best interest of the firm in mind. He may have bought the land with the others from the firm in order to offer it for a project at a later date. All of the information is not given in the dilemma scenario, so no assumptions can be made. The scenario has to be examined from every possible angle, both legal and ethical, to determine what the best possible outcome is for the person trying to find a site for the new project. The first question is who is in charge? In this case it would be the person determining which site will be selected. Next, it needs to be ascertained whether the site at Grand and Broad is the best for the upcoming project or not. The scenario also says that the person doing the bidding is in the final stages of determining the site. If the CEO has just recently started talking about his reference, what does that imply? Someone may also need to talk to the CEO about the ethical dilemma that is presented here, and help him understand how this will look whether there is any misconduct or not (Emig, Greer & Zach, 2003). The dilemmas within this scenario will all be discussed on both legal and ethical grounds

When a person is given the responsibility of finding land for a new site, they must already have the individual authority to either take an offer or refuse same. This authority allows them to take as many bids for a job, or search for the best land to acquire, based on the needs of the organization. The trust that the board of directors gave to that person is the inviolable pact. If the land is chosen for any reason other than it is the best based on all criteria, then the searcher are in legal hot water. The source of the land does not matter if it is searched for honestly and all possible sites are given the same chance. There would be other sites for the project manager to choose from and these would have other sellers. The questions that would have to be asked are: What is the best location for the new project site? Why is that particular location, or locations, desired? Are there adequate utilities to the site that will render it easy to use? Without a thorough knowledge of all the requirements for the desired site it would be impossible for the project manager to find the correct place.

However, having said that, if the land at Grand and Broad is the best possible location for the new project, then it should be purchased. There is a dilemma regarding the CEO and the other members of the staff who have an interest in the property. The property at Broad and Grand could be just as good as any of the others, but it is not without problems (Robinson, Jackson, Franklin & Clayton, 2010). Of course, it would need to be properly documented why this was the best possible place to construct the project. The paper trail would have to be above board, so that if a lawsuit does come from one of the other sites you have the legal standing to make the case that you were not swayed in any way by urging from the CEO. The legal aspects of this transaction could be very dicey, so making sure that all bases are covered in that aspect would ensure, for all parties involved that there is not an issue.

If there is undo pressure from the CEO, then the person buying the property has legal recourse. It is the same if a person is sexually harassing you and tells you that unless you do certain things they are not going to promote you. Or you will get certain perks on the job for sexual favors. A person cannot be harassed by an employer to make them do anything that would be illegal or seem unethical. If the piece of property is the best site at the best price, but the CEO is applying undo pressure, then the property should still not be considered. The scenario just says that the CEO has been advocating for this certain property. The person making the selection needs to find ot why this piece of property is the perfect one. It seems that the location is the reason that they want to purchase this, but there could be other factors, besides their financial interest, that make this a particularly desirable place.

The CEO should realize that he or she can get into legal trouble because they have an interest in the property. Of course, that person would understand the possible legal ramifications of their interest in the property. But, it is the duty of the person making the selection to advise them of the problems. If the company selects the property and everything is above board, then the other property owners can still say that there was undo favor given to the CEO and other staff members. They could go to court and claim that their properties were not given the chance that the CEO's was. It does not matter whether they are correct or not. Perception, in many cases, is reality. When the case does go to court, the law would be sympathetic to the other people. The burden of proof would be in the company who placed the bid on the property. The other property owners would not have a difficult time in making the case that there was collusion of some sort, even if it there was nothing illegal done.

The thing to do is look at all the properties that have the requirements that you need for the project. Then find the property that is going to give the company the best financial deal. If that is the property on Grand and Broad, then it should be purchased no matter who owns it.

Ethically, the dilemma is what the person selecting the property thinks. A little bit of introspection needs to happen on their part. What is their reason for selecting a certain property? It would be just as wrong if they did not select the property that the CEO is advocating for if the only reason they did not select it is because he had an interest in it. The person selecting the property should be clear, within himself or herself, that the reason for selecting the property chosen was because that was the best possible solution for the company's project needs.

They could also talk honestly to the CEO and the other people involved separately to see what their reasoning is. They could tell the person selecting the property, individually, that they think that the Grand and Broad property is the best and why they think so. It would be up to the selecting agent to determine if they were being truthful or not.

Another point to make, is that the CEO should not have put an employee into this position in the first place. The ethical thing to do may be to ask that the company hire an outside firm to do the property selection. The interest of the company is the primary concern, so if this is the best decision for all parties then that is what should be done. Having an outside realty firm make the selection would take away the possibility of influence. When the CEO put an employee into the position of deciding for or against him, he forced the employee into a situation that was too difficult.

The employee has to think of what the ramifications of the decision could be. As mentioned before, if they choose the property, there could be court action. If they do not choose the property, then the CEO may think they did not… [END OF PREVIEW]

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