Frederick Douglas Narrative Term Paper

Pages: 3 (941 words)  ·  Bibliography Sources: 0  ·  File: .docx  ·  Level: College Senior  ·  Topic: Black Studies

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And, to escape to the North, Frederick had to leave behind his friends and his wife who he was not sure if he would ever see again.

Slave owners thought they could best control their slaves by taking measures to keep them ignorant. But, Frederick was taught to read by his mistress, Sophia Auld, at the Auld Home in Baltimore. Although Sophia was delighted with Frederick's abilities, her husband became furious because he felt that if a slave could read and write, the slave would no longer obey his master without question or thought and could forge papers that would give the slave freedom.

Hugh instructed Sophia to discontinue the reading lessons. Realizing that reading was a key to gaining freedom, Douglass would continue his own reading efforts even though this would outrage his mistress. Later on Douglas would organize a religions service for slaves, but they were soon stopped by a mob led by his slave master.

Blacks had little hope of obtaining justice through the southern court system, which refused to accept a black person's testimony against a white person. After being hired out to a local shipbuilder so that he could learn the caulker trade, Frederick was harassed by white workers who did not want blacks competing with them for jobs. One afternoon, a group of white apprentices beat up Frederick and nearly took out one of his eyes. Attempts to press charges were unsuccessful because none of the shipyard's white employees would testify and because the black man's word was useless in a court of law.Download full Download Microsoft Word File
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TOPIC: Term Paper on Frederick Douglas Narrative of the Assignment

After his flight to the North, Douglass was amazed to find that northerners were wealthier than most slave owners in Maryland. He had expected that they would be as poor as the people in the South who could not afford slaves. Even more revealing, Douglass discovered that many free blacks lived better than some of his previous slave masters such as Thomas Auld or Edward Covey. And, on the New Bedford wharves, he saw how industry made extensive use of labor saving mechanical devices. In loading a ship, five men and an ox did what it took twenty men to do in a southern port. Men who neither held a whip nor submitted to it worked more quietly and efficiently than those who did.

In summary, the suffering of slaves was immense and unnecessary. Through his unfortunate experiences, Douglass had discovered that men who are whipped the most are the ones that are whipped the easiest. So he began to fight back. By standing up for himself he became in his own mind a man of dignity and courage. And, he earned his place in history as one of the world's greatest men. [END OF PREVIEW] . . . READ MORE

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