History of Missouri Term Paper

Pages: 6 (2245 words)  ·  Bibliography Sources: 0  ·  File: .docx  ·  Level: College Senior  ·  Topic: Black Studies

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She was separated from her parents when eleven years old and brought to Missouri from Tennessee. She never saw any of her folks again and the last words her mother said to her was: "Daughter, if I never see you again any more on earth, come to heaven and I will see you there."

Did you go to church?

Yes, our Master took his slaves to meetin' with him. They had one corner where they sat with the slaves of other people. There was always something about that I couldn't understand. They treated the colored folks like animals and would not hesitate to sell and separate them, yet they seemed to think they had souls and tried to make christians of them. I was raised up to be a Cumberland Presbyterian.

Freedwomen often entered their free life with this same sort of religious zeal, continuing to worship and eventually form their own black community churches. Another narrative tells of the circumstance of going to church with whites and represents a feeling of apartness and separation from society, in both space and action.

I remember j'inin' the white folks church in.old Cambridge. They had a gallery for the slaves." Isabelle grinned, "And sometimes the slaves did funny things."

There was one old woman named Aunt Cindy," she related. "One Sunday she got 'happy' and commenced shoutin' and throwin' herself about. White folks in the seats below hurried to get out from under the gallery, fearin'.Aunt Cindy, was goin' to lose her balance and fall on them.

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Treatment of free blacks was often as harsh or harsher than treatment of slaves, as the fear of revolt was always at a great height, especially during the early years of Missouri's attempt to gain statehood and during the debates over the state as of Missouri as a free or slave state. During this time the rule was hard and punishment for even suspicion of wrongdoing was harsh. The same can be said for women and men, additionally women often had the burden of protecting their children from the harsh backlash of minor transgressions.

Term Paper on History of Missouri There Is Assignment

Another institution, which reflected the paranoia of white society with regard to free Negroes, was the slave patrol. The object of the patrol was to prevent "riots, routs and unlawful assemblies by the slaves." Despite its name, free blacks were deemed under its control also. Often, the patrol was simply charged with the responsibility of policing the Negro section of a town and arresting any "strange Negroes." In reality it amounted to little more than a vigilante committee that terrorized Negroes.

Within the world of black women, slave or free in Missouri there were many things to fear and little success and comfort to be had. Women lived modestly, always seeking greater levels of freedom, intellectual, spiritual, and economic as well as legal and always working.

State of Missouri Official Manual, 1973-1974 The Role of the Negro in Missouri History at http://www.umsl.edu/services/library/blackstudies/freenegr.htm

Vernon L. Volpe, "The Fremonts and Emancipation in Missouri," The Historian 56.2 (1994) 339-348.

State of Missouri Official Manual, 1973-1974 The Role of the Negro in Missouri History at: www.umsl.edu/services/library/blackstudies/freenegr.htm" State of Missouri Official Manual, 1973-1974 The Role of the Negro in Missouri History at http://www.umsl.edu/services/library/blackstudies/freenegr.htm

Allen, Parson & Hannah. Slave Narratives -- Missouri. 1936-1938 Western Historical Manuscripts Collection. University of Missouri Columbia, Missouri George P. Rawick Papers. At http://www.umsl.edu/~libweb/blackstudies

State of Missouri Official Manual, 1973-1974 The Role of the Negro in Missouri History at: www.umsl.edu/services/library/blackstudies/freenegr.htm" State of Missouri Official Manual, 1973-1974 The Role of the Negro in Missouri History at http://www.umsl.edu/services/library/blackstudies/freenegr.htm

Nancee L. Lyons, "Missouri: A Black Hub in the Heartland," American Visions Oct.-Nov. 1996 11/5 44-49.

Discus, Malinda. Slave Narratives -- Missouri. 1936-1938 Western Historical Manuscripts Collection. University of Missouri Columbia, Missouri George P. Rawick Papers. At http://www.umsl.edu/~libweb/blackstudies

Henderson, Isabelle, Slave Narratives -- Missouri. 1936-1938 Western Historical Manuscripts Collection. University of Missouri Columbia, Missouri George P. Rawick Papers. At http://www.umsl.edu/~libweb/blackstudies

State of Missouri Official Manual, 1973-1974 The Role of the Negro in Missouri History at: www.umsl.edu/services/library/blackstudies/freenegr.htm" State of Missouri Official Manual, 1973-1974 The Role of the Negro in Missouri History at http://www.umsl.edu/services/library/blackstudies/freenegr.htm [END OF PREVIEW] . . . READ MORE

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