Human-Machine Interface on the Flight Deck Capstone Project

Pages: 10 (3048 words)  ·  Bibliography Sources: 10  ·  File: .docx  ·  Level: College Senior  ·  Topic: Engineering

SAMPLE EXCERPT . . .
Scientific evidence from primary and secondary sources will be used to show the value of the addressed area of concern. After the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the data regarding accidents before and after changes that have been made to the human-machine interface, the researcher will use scientific concepts to propose recommendations that will enhance this technology and eradicate the issues associated with it. The researcher will propose recommendations based on the concepts of cognitive abilities of the human beings, limitations of electronic devices and integration of technological advancements and preferences of pilots (Letsu Dake, Rogers, Dorneich & De Mers, 2012). In addition to that, it is important to show how the authority for making changes and carrying things out properly can be divided in the proper manner. This division will be among the pilots and other authorities of the technology, so that the pilots may remain motivated, and so that unnecessary fatigue and workload does not become an issue (Boy & Carlo Cacciabue, 1997).

Cultural Literacy

"The student will be able to analyze historic events, cultural artifacts and philosophical concepts" (ERAU, 2014).Buy full Download Microsoft Word File paper
for $19.77

Capstone Project on Human-Machine Interface on the Flight Deck Assignment

Having cultural literacy requires an analysis of current and historical events and cultural norms. In order to satisfy this objective, the researcher will delve into the origin and development of automation within the cockpit. Under this section, the researcher will discuss the events that led towards the deployment of automation in the aviation industry. In addition to that, the trends and events that highlighted the issues associated with flight deck human-machine interface will be discussed. The past culture of non-automation affected the human-machine interface by requiring much more of the pilot and other flight crew. When more automated systems began to be used, however, it was easy to see that much of the pressure previously placed on the pilots was relieved. That was important, and something that had to be considered in order to move forward with automation ideas that were truly helpful and valuable. Safety was also affected, because it became very important for pilots to get rest breaks and to make sure they did not fly too many hours at one time. Automation changed the entire culture of aviation, and the ways in which that took place must be addressed.

Lifelong Personal Growth

"The student will be able to demonstrate the skills needed to enrich the quality of life through activities which enhance and promote lifelong learning" (ERAU, 2014).

Enriching the quality of life through lifelong learning is vital for personal growth and development. This section will propose recommendations in relation to training and development of the pilots and flight crew, which will enable the concerned authorities to reduce human error associated with this technology. These recommendations will be based on the concepts of continuous and effective training and development of the pilots, decentralized and inclusive decision making, and other related techniques that promote lifelong personal growth and enable the professionals to reap the maximum potential benefits of the technology (Staff Members of the General Aviation Manufacturers Association, 2013). No matter the value of the technology in and of itself, it cannot provide true value to the organization or the field of study if it is not properly used or if all of its benefits are not utilized.

Aeronautical Science

"The student will demonstrate an understanding and application of the basic and thus advanced concepts of aeronautical science as they apply to the aviation/aerospace industry for solving problems" (ERAU, 2014)

Both basic and advanced concepts of aeronautical science can be used to solve problems within that field. This section will propose recommendations that will be made in the design of the flight deck human-machine interface. That will enable the pilot to have visual surveillance outside the cockpit, including viewing for landing and obstruction avoidance, and assessment of airborne traffic. In addition, unobstructed and clear views of the internal displays and controls will be addressed. Recommendations will enable the development of easy manual intervention in the controls without increase in the probability of improper aviation (Staff Members of the General Aviation Manufacturers Association, 2013).

Aviation Legislation and Law

"The student will engage and discuss to present an understanding and application of basic concepts in National and International Legislation and Law as they pertain to the aviation/aerospace industry" (ERAU, 2014).

After the issues associated with the flight deck human machine interface have been revealed various amendments were made in the U.S. Federal Aviation Regulation 14 CFR (Staff Members of the Flight Safety Foundation, 2008). All of these amendments will be discussed in order to show their value, and their necessity in aviation law. Apart from that, this section will also propose recommendations in relation to the changes that shall be made in the aviation legislation and law to further enhance the security of the airlines.

Aviation Safety

"The student will compare and discuss in written and spoken formats an understanding and application of basic concepts in aviation safety as they pertain to the aviation/aerospace industry" (ERAU, 2014).

The basic concepts in aviation safety provide important value and information for those who are interested in a better understanding of human-machine interface. This section will aim at addressing the three major aviation safety issues that exist in the present era. These include: development of technologies that will enable the concerned authorities to reduce the number of accidents through the introduction of enhanced vehicle designs, structures and subsystems; development of technologies that will enable the concerned authorities to reduce the number of accidents through the enhancement of aerospace vehicle operations that take place on the ground and in air as well; and development of techniques that will enable the concerned authorities to ensure safety of the crew and the passengers in case of any hazardous event. The above-mentioned issues will be addressed through an analysis of the human factors that deteriorate air safety, and the elimination of these factors through training and development. Apart from that, research on more advanced methods that ensure the safety of crew and passengers in case of any accident will also be conducted under this section (Staff Members of the Federal Aviation Administration and National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2012).

Aviation Management and Operations

"The student will present and illustrate an understanding and application of management activities as they apply to aviation/aerospace operations" (ERAU, 2014).

Management activities are a large part of behind-the-scenes concerns in the aviation field. One of the most effective management practices that will be deployed in order to effectively manage automation is the appropriate management of workload, as it enables the pilots to stay motivated and avoid fatigue. Apart from that, appropriate prioritization of tasks is also essential for the avoidance of human errors. These errors are one of the basic issues related to this type of technology. Furthermore, training and development of the pilots and crew can reduce the hazards of the technology and make it more successful. Development of appropriate decision making abilities in the crew and pilots is also an essential management practice that is required for the elimination of issues associated with flight deck human-machine interface. (Naranji, Mazzuchi & Sarkani, 2013)

References

Boy, G., & Carlo Cacciabue, P. (1997). Optimization of automation in the civil flight deck, pp. 1-19. European Workshop to Develop Human Factors Guidelines for Flight Deck Certification.

Chialastri, A. (2012). Automation in Aviation, pp. 79-100. Croatia: InTech Europe. Retrieved from http://cdn.intechopen.com/pdfs-wm/37990.pdf

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. (2014). College of Aeronautics: Undergraduate Capstone Policy Guide. Retrieved January 1, 2014 from https://erau.blackboard.com/bbcswebdav/institution/Worldwide_Online/ASCI_490_C/Aeronautics_UG_Capstone_Policy_Guide.pdf.

Funk, K., Niemczyk, M., Suroteguh, C., & Owen, G. (1999). Flight deck automation issues. The International Journal of Aviation Psychology, 9(2), 109 -- 123.

Funk, K., Suroteguh, C., Wilson, J., & Lyall, B. (1998). Flight deck automation and task management, 1, 863 -- 868.

Hox, J., & Boeije, H. (2007). Encyclopedia of social measurement, pp. 593-599. Oxford: Elsevier.

Kappenberger, C., & Stepniczka, I. (2012). HMIAC - SURVEY ON HUMAN-MACHINE INTERACTION IN AIRCRAFT COCKPITS, pp. 3-15. Vienna: University of Vienna.

Letsu-Dake, E., Rogers, W., Dorneich, M., & De Mers, R. (2012). Innovative Flight Deck Function Allocation Concepts for NextGen. FL: CRC Press, 301-310.

Naranji, E., Mazzuchi, T., & Sarkani, S. (2013). Reducing Human/Pilot Error in Aviation Using Augmented Cognition Systems and Automation Systems in Aircraft Cockpit (1st ed., pp. 3-36). Arlington: National Defense Industrial Association.

Staff Members of the Federal Aviation Administration and National Aeronautics and Space Administration, (2012). Human Factors Research Status Report, pp. 2-32. London: Federal Aviation Administration and National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Staff Members of the Flight Safety Foundation, (2008). Auto-flight Audit, pp. 30-34. Virginia: Flight Safety Foundation.

Staff Members of the General Aviation Manufacturers Association, (2013). Recommended Practices and Guidelines for Part 23 Cockpit/Flight Deck Design, pp. 1-15. Washington: General Aviation Manufacturers Association.

Staff Members of the University of New Mexico, (2010). Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria, pp. 1-12. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico. Retrieved from http://www.unm.edu/~rrobergs/604Lect2.pdf

Staff Members of the College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University,… [END OF PREVIEW] . . . READ MORE

Two Ordering Options:

?
Which Option Should I Choose?
1.  Buy full paper (10 pages)Download Microsoft Word File

Download the perfectly formatted MS Word file!

- or -

2.  Write a NEW paper for me!✍🏻

We'll follow your exact instructions!
Chat with the writer 24/7.

Human-Machine Interface Issues in Flight Deck Operations Term Paper


Human Factors Engineering Documented Evidence Term Paper


Mechanical and Structural Factors in Aviation Safety Case Study


Aviation Accidents & Situational Awareness Dissertation


Effect of Automation on Situational Awareness in Flight Operations Research Paper


View 200+ other related papers  >>

How to Cite "Human-Machine Interface on the Flight Deck" Capstone Project in a Bibliography:

APA Style

Human-Machine Interface on the Flight Deck.  (2014, September 10).  Retrieved September 29, 2020, from https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/human-machine-interface-flight-deck/3783445

MLA Format

"Human-Machine Interface on the Flight Deck."  10 September 2014.  Web.  29 September 2020. <https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/human-machine-interface-flight-deck/3783445>.

Chicago Style

"Human-Machine Interface on the Flight Deck."  Essaytown.com.  September 10, 2014.  Accessed September 29, 2020.
https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/human-machine-interface-flight-deck/3783445.