Research Paper: Human Sex Trafficking

Pages: 6 (2204 words)  ·  Bibliography Sources: 6  ·  Level: College Senior  ·  Topic: Family and Marriage  ·  Buy This Paper

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[. . .] This is not always the case, though, some of the girls are victims of advertisements placed in local papers for "modeling" jobs in the west, "marriage" proposals, and even what looks to be legitimate offers of employment as nannies, restaurant workers, etc. (Kara, 2008).

Because of the economic viability of trafficking, it is difficult to enact international laws that are rigid enough and enforceable, to put a dent into the problem. It is only with Western pressure from the United Nations and resultant agencies, and other private and public groups, that prosecution is even attempted. The people that are engaged in this trafficking at the international level are, in fact, typically part of the wealthy and/or upper crust of the societies in question. They are the ones who are able to afford the bribes, transportation, and have the connections to make this behavior possible. And, interestingly enough, the idea of human slavery is abhorrent to most of these individuals for their own family, but they, like many in the 16th-18th century looked at the African Slave Trade, look at the individuals being sold as somehow less than human. Indeed, this is perhaps the most deviant part of these behaviors, looking at another human being as nothing more than a commodity to be bought and sold (Bales, 2004).

In the United States, the Bureau of Justice has set up an Anti-Human Trafficking Task Force designed to develop law enforcement and communities to identify trafficking and help with their rescue and to support task forces to collaborate with local, State and Federal agencies to aggressively pursue and prosecute those suspected of human trafficking (Bureau of Justice, 2012).

And, it is not just the idea of law and changing the nature of legal scrutiny that is necessary to control this issue, but the nature of how a human is defined. As long as there is such a clear disparity between the classes in the developing world, there will be people willing to sell children. If there is a market, there will be a supply -- and as supply and demand increase, so does the market price. Economic downturns continue to aggravate this issue, and even increased international attention does not seem sufficient to alleviate the problem. Instead, while beyond the purview of this essay, it will be increased globalization, and the resultant change in both attitude and economic system, that may help eventually control human trafficking. Until then, we must support the efforts of many of the United Nations and other benevolent organizations, who report, track, aid, and help secure help for those afflicted by this very modern societal disease. If not, the trend of 12-27 million people who are part of this system, ae oppressed women, and an unbearable 50% of modern slave children under the age of 13, will continue unabated (Farr, 2004).

REFERENCES

Human Trafficking: A Brief Overview. (December 2009). Social Development Notes. No 122. Retrieved from: http://siteresources.worldbank.org / EXTSOCIALDEVELOPMENT/Resources/244362-1239390842422/6012763-1239905793229/Human_Trafficking.pdf

Trafficking Family on America's Most Wanted. (March 2, 2009). Nobodies -- Modern American Slave Labor and the Dark Side of the Global Economy. Retrieved from: http://johnbowe.wordpress.com/category/sex-slavery/

Basil, N. (2009). Factors Sustaining Human Trafficking in Contemporary Society. Psychologia. 17 (1): 161-69.

Bureau of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice. (2012). Anti-Human Trafficking Task Force Initiative. BJA.GOV. Retrieved from: https://www.bja.gov / ProgramDetails.aspx?Program_ID=51

Farr, K. (2004), Sex Trafficking: The Global Market in Women and Children. Dallas, TX: Worth Publishers.

Hacken, J. (2011). Transnational Crime in the Developing World. Global Financial Integrity. Retrieved from: http://www.gfintegrity.org/storage/gfip/documents/reports/transcrime/gfi_transnational_crime_web.pdf

Human Trafficking Awareness Partnerships (HTAP). (2012). FAQ and Information. Retrieved from: http://humantraffickingawareness.com/faqs-mainmenu-34.html

Shelley, L. (2010). Human Trafficking, A Global Perspective. New York: Cambridge

United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime. (2013). Human Trafficking. Retrieved from: http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/human-trafficking/what-is-human-trafficking.html?ref=menuside#UNODC%27s_Response

U.S. Department of State. (January 2006). Fact Sheet: Distinctions Between Human Smuggling and Human Trafficking. Retrieved from: http://www.state.gov / m/ds/hstcenter/90434.htm

Zheng, T., ed. (2010). Sex Trafficking, Human Rights, and Social Justice. New York:

Routledge.

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https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/human-sex-trafficking-introduction/6630307.