Essay: Imagery Help Evoke Emotion in This Poem?

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¶ … imagery help evoke emotion in this poem? Choose three images from the poem and describe the emotions that the images evoke. Explain how the images are connected to the emotions.

The imagery is illustrating a range of emotions that a person is feeling. The way that this is depicted is through the use of three examples in the poem (to Marguerite-Continued) these include: the utilization of light, the island and spring. In the poem there is a discussion of the sentiments an individual is going through. During this process, they are experiencing different thoughts. The use of light is talking about the sense of uncertainty and isolation. Evidence of this can be seen with the passage that says, "But when the moon their hollows lights." This is showing how there is a more somber tone for these emotions with the use of the words moon and hollow lights. (Arnold, n.d.)

The island is highlighting a sense of isolation that everyone is feeling associated with their lives. A good example of this can be seen with the passage that says, "Dotting the shoreless watery wild. We mortals live alone. The islands feel the enclasping flow. And then their endless bounds they know." These ideas are talking about the sense of uncertainty with use of the word watery. At the same time, it is discussing the feelings of isolation with the island illustrating the total sense of seclusion. (Arnold, n.d.)

Spring is utilized to show how there is change in the thoughts of the individual. Evidence of this can be seen in the passage which says, "And they are swept by balms of spring. And in their glens on starry nights. The nightingales divinely sing. And lovely notes, from shore to shore. Across the sounds and channels pour." This is underscoring how there is a shift in the tone and attitude with use of the concepts of spring (which is signifying a major transformation). (Arnold, n.d.)

2. How does "London" reflect the issues and characteristics of the Romantic period? Describe three ways in which the poem discusses or comments on the problems or issues. Your response should at least 2 paragraphs long. Read pages 522-533

The poem London is discussing the city's image of: industrialization and progress during the Romantic period. Yet, it is also talking about the negative side effects of these changes and the attitude of society. The way that this occurs is through different observations from walking around London. (Blake, n.d.)

A good example of this can be seen in the passage which says, "In every cry of every man. In every infant's cry of fear, in every voice, in very ban. The mind-forged manacles I hear. How the chimney sweeper's cry. Every blackening church appalls. And the hapless soldier's sigh. Runs in blood down palace walls." This is illustrating the challenges that most people will endure as a part of daily life. In their situation, violence and extreme amounts of suffering are not unusual. (Blake, n.d.)

Moreover, Blake (n.d.) is talking about how there is also youths who will use the night and the current situation to their advantage. This is because they are all a part of the underbelly that represents the mirror image of progress during the Romantic period. Evidence of this can be seen in the passage which says, "But most through midnight streets I hear. How the youthful harlot's curse. Blasts the newborn infant's tear. And blights with plagues the marriage hearse." This is showing how London is a combination of two different worlds. On the surface, it is supposed to be a thriving metropolis. Yet, the reality is that there are high amounts of poverty, death, economic blight and degradation. This is because the disparities in society are often ignored. In many ways, one could argue that the poem is a reflection of the criticisms of modern society and the advances that are taking place. (Blake, n.d.)

3. What images does Conrad use to portray the setting of the Congo River? How does the setting imply the clash between European and African cultures or world views? How might Africans portray Africa differently than Conrad's Marlow?

Conrad (n.d.) is showing the Congo River as place that time has forgotten. As the area, was so desolate that his mind would often wander. A good example of this can be seen in the passage which says, "Going up that river was like traveling back to the earliest beginnings of the world, when vegetation rioted on the earth and the big trees were kings. An empty stream, a great silence, an impenetrable forest. The air was warm, thick, heavy, sluggish. There was no joy in the brilliance of sunshine. The long stretches of the waterway ran on, deserted, into the gloom of overshadowed distances." (Conrad, n.d.) This is illustrating how river has a rugged sense of tranquility. During his time on the steamship, is when this can fool Conrad into daydreaming about past events. As a result, this is showing how the Congo River has a sense of untamed adventure. (Conrad, n.d.)

The way the setting is displaying differing views can be seen with the description about the jungle and it sense of uneasiness. Evidence of this can be seen with the passage that says, "The broadening waters flowed through a mob of wooded islands; you lost your way on that river as you would in a desert, and butted all day long against shoals, trying to find the channel, till you thought yourself bewitched and cut off forever from everything you had known once -- somewhere -- far away in another existence perhaps. The broadening waters flowed through a mob of wooded islands; you lost your way on that river as you would in a desert, and butted all day long against shoals, trying to find the channel, till you thought yourself bewitched and cut off forever from everything you had known once -- somewhere -- far away in another existence perhaps." This is showing how the setting is implying the way the views of the Africans and Europeans are different. For the Europeans, they see the Congo River and the jungle as a dangerous sense of calm. While the Africans will see the river, plants, wildlife and stillness as a part of history that dates back centuries. These contrasting views are illustrated by feelings of uneasiness in the poem. (Conrad, n.d.)

The way that an African would portray these events is to show how the river is the lifeline for their people and civilization. The sense of uneasiness is the fact that many people do not want the Europeans in the Congo (with a silent contempt for them). Over the course of time, this will turn into anger that will lead to the eventual withdrawal of the European powers from Africa. (Conrad, n.d.)

4. There is a great debate among literary critics about whether or not the historical context of a piece of literature is important in understanding the literature. Some critics argue that you can only fully understand a piece of literature if you understand the historical events that were ongoing when it was being written. Others argue that each piece of literature is independent of its historical context and you should not have to look for information outside the text to understand it. What do you think?

History is playing important part in helping to understand the ideas, emotions and issues of the time frame that is being studied. In the world of literature, the background of events will allow everyone to comprehend specific problems and the way they are seen in everyday life. This helps the readers to have a sense of appreciation for challenges that many individuals went through. (Henry, n.d., pp. 522- 535) (Legett, n.d., pp. 802 -- 818)

In the case of the Romantic period, this can be seen with poem the Chimney Sweeper. The entire discussion is about everyday life for a chimney sweeper. This is highlighting the dangers of their work and the challenges of the position (which is typical of this time). Evidence of this can be seen in passage which says, "And by came an Angel who had a bright key, and he opened the cofflns and set them all free; Then down a greenp lain leaping, laughing, t hey run, and wash in a river. And shine in the Sun. Then naked and white, all their bags left behind, They rise upon clouds and sport in the wind. And the Angel told Tom, if he'd be a good boy, He'd have God for his father, and never wanto joy." (Blake, n.d.) (Henry, n.d., pp. 522- 535) (Legett, n.d., pp. 802 -- 818) (Gray, n.d., pp. 678 -- 697)

This is showing the transformations that are taking place in society with economic divisions becoming more apparent. The question is will this result an open revolt against upper class rule. This is significant, because this kind of literature is providing more specific insights about… [END OF PREVIEW]

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