John La Farge Term Paper

Pages: 9 (2566 words)  ·  Bibliography Sources: ≈ 20  ·  File: .docx  ·  Level: College Senior  ·  Topic: Art  (general)

SAMPLE EXCERPT . . .
For example, at the monastery of Kurodani, the painter is shown the graves of Nawozane and Atsumori

. The relationship between nature and religion, between nature and the funeral perspective is obvious here, as "the pine tree still stands upon which the warrior hung his armor when, tormented by remorse, he carried out his vow of never more bearing arms"

The next paragraphs, however, are mythological and historical recollections of the facts that had led to the slaying of Atsumori. The first lines in this essay have begun by describing John La Farge as a personality of the Renaissance. The description of the monastery at Kurodani and the graves shows why this is so: La Farge is never satisfied with what he is told and always aims to bring out more and discover the intrinsic relationships between art, culture, history and the very personal and particular individual spirit.

La Farge's interest in Eastern civilization made him take a second trip in the region, with the same Henry Adams, this time in the South Seas. Between 1890 and 1891, the two visited extensive areas in Polynesia, including Tahiti, Fidji, Samoa and Hawaii

He preceded Gauguin in Tahiti by only four days, as he left the island on the 5th of June 1891. The two great painters of the 19th century would thus never meet. La Farge's recollection of Gauguin is cited from a letter to Henry Adams, written years later, in which a certain melancholy of the simple life that Gauguin was able to live in Tahiti is expressed:

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'I say wild Frenchman, I should say stupid Frenchman. I mean Gauguin. [...] He went into the wilderness and lived the simple life - the coconut and breadfruit life - with some relative companion to charm the simplicity of food etc. All that seemed natural enough; stupid enough; and yet there was something of the man who had found something"

Term Paper on John La Farge Is Often Assignment

In his trip in Polynesia and the South Seas, John La Farge explored, much the same as he had previously in Japan, the relationship between nature and the individual. La Farge sketched and later painted much of the natural elements in the South Seas, including volcanoes in Hawaii or particular floristic models, with clear inspiration from the nature he saw. His quality as a Western painter, in need of a model to reproduce, has somehow never left La Farge throughout his life as a painter. The boy Sopo, from Samoa, is a clear example in this sense. The painter's interest in this picture is simply to keenly portray a Samoan boy. The pose itself seems to remind the audience of the Western paintings, as it is somewhat unnatural and glorifying. The boy also stands on one leg alone and looks somewhere in the distance to somewhat we cannot see. The composition in its entirety belongs to Western principles, but the colors are vivid and bright, suitable for the landscape depicted.

La Farge's interest to cover and depict as many elements of a people's conscience as possible, including traditions and mythology is also shown in a sketch depicting a phase of classical Samoan courtship. The interest here is not necessarily towards portraying the actual characters in the painting, but towards describing a Samoan tradition. John La Farge appears again in his Renaissance condition, a man of many interests in many domains.

John La Farge can probably be considered one of the most original and complete painters of the 19th century, not only in the United States but the entire world. He was remarkable first of all as a painter. Indeed, his contact with Eastern art and culture and, especially with Japanese art, has led him to experience with watercolors and oil paintings in a way that had never been previously used in Western painting.

Even if many of his works are keen reproductions of different models or landscapes, the inner spiritual component, so important in Japanese art, is clear in many of them.

On the other hand, John La Farge was also an exquisite writer and his accounts of his travels in Japan and the South Seas can stand today as some of the most scientific and complete works of the region. As I have previously shown from some of the primary sources quoted, John La Farge goes to all necessary extent to pursue a complete description of a cultural element or of an individual perception.

In this sense, his approach has earned him the reconnaissance of a true man of the Renaissance, because his interests never seem to stop in only one place. Art is for John La Farge always encompassed by other elements which determine its evolution and its representation. Art on itself does not exist, but gains life through its forms of manifestation.

Bibliography

1. John La Farge. On the Internet at http://www.metmuseum.org/explore/lafarge/Html/Index.htm

2. JOHN LA FARGE. On the Internet at http://www.butlerart.com/pc_book/pages/john_la_farge_1835.htm

3. Biography-John La Farge. On the Internet at http://www.crgalleries.com/lafarge.html

4. Akiko Mabuchi. Japanese Art and Japonisme Part I: Early English Writings. Ganesha Publishing, 1999

5. Meiji period -- from Wikipedia. On the Internet at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meiji_period

6. La Farge, John. An Artist's Letters from Japan. Copyright 2000 by the Cornell University Library. Historia. Page 756.

7. An american artist in the South Seas. John La Farge; introduction by Kaori O'Connor. - London and New York: KPI, 1987

John La Farge. On the Internet at http://www.metmuseum.org/explore/lafarge/Html/Index.htm

JOHN LA FARGE. On the Internet at http://www.butlerart.com/pc_book/pages/john_la_farge_1835.htm

Biography-John La Farge. On the Internet at http://www.crgalleries.com/lafarge.html

Ibid.

Akiko Mabuchi. Japanese Art and Japonisme Part I: Early English Writings. Ganesha Publishing, 1999

Meiji period -- from Wikipedia. On the Internet at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meiji_period

Akiko Mabuchi. Japanese Art and Japonisme Part I: Early English Writings-Introduction. Ganesha Publishing, 1999

http://www.butlerart.com/pc_book/pages/john_la_farge_1835.htm

- for the painting and discussions on the representation

La Farge, John. An Artist's Letters from Japan. Copyright 2000 by the Cornell University Library. Historia. Page 756.

Ibid. Page 756

An american artist in the South Seas. John La Farge; introduction by Kaori O'Connor. - London and New York: KPI, 1987

Letter to Henry Adams. From An american artist in the South Seas. John La Farge; introduction by Kaori O'Connor. Page XVI [END OF PREVIEW] . . . READ MORE

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