Mental Health Care System Term Paper

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As a result, the juvenile justice system has been actively involved in the expansion of community-based treatment programs across the nation, particularly best-practice programs that might be adopted on the road to future reform; community assessment centers, juvenile drug courts (already in place in Florida, most particularly in Miami-Dade), integrated case management, graduated sanctions, and strength-based approaches.

These actions on behalf of the justice system not only spurred reinvigorated local strength, but also national attention in such a way that the system is growing into a comprehensive, integrated net of care.

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At a local level, the needs of a teen in mental health or abusive crisis has needs so complex that they can defy solution by any once agency, no matter how capable. Most community services tend to occur in "silos" of treatment, where one endeavor takes control and fails to interact well with others. With teens in addictions and substance abuse situations, they are already split between systems: child and adult, juvenile justice and mental health, needing parental support and spreading solitary wings; it is the role of a sufficient system of provision to recognize this particular spread and break down silos to work in an integrating fashion. The Staten Island Mental Health Society is an example of this cooperation; the Children's Community Mental Health Center, which treats young teens and sometimes those as old as 21, combines school-based counseling, special education, family counseling, and summer services to reach out and touch the teen in all aspects of life, working between agencies that might otherwise be ignored.

Term Paper on Mental Health Care System the Assignment

Family involvement in teen treatment is also an important part of long-term success in youths in any type of the service system. Substance abuse in a child can be a moment of familial crisis, but can be even worse when that abuse is part of the family situation; stigma, legal intervention, and incongruous families can make bringing relatives into the treatment fold a monumental task. Frequently, other children, jobs, and situations preclude a parent's ability to navigate the silos of care so rampant in the mental health system. SAMHSA, as restructured by the New Freedom Commission, makes a strategic attempt to plan, attend, and involve families in the mental health and abuse treatment of their teens.

The SAMHSA system provides not only pamphlet and counseling support in all their offices, including their "Family Guide to Keeping Youth Mentally Healthy and Drug Free," it also provides continued support on their website, allowing for an outreach opportunity that might inhibit the stigma felt in seeking initial physical help. The SAMHSA program also stresses the importance of knowledge about drugs and issues affecting teens, available in the National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information, but also about making the time to talk in a 15-minute-daily campaign called "Make Time to Listen ... Take Time To Talk."

In each case with drug treatment, SAMHSA involves the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism in dealing with teens with drug and alcohol problems. Additionally, it provides a nationwide collection of Substance Abuse Treatment Facilities with family-based outreach programs. Services are offered not only in English but also in Spanish, as well as other locationally-specific languages, to help support the family and give each member the opportunity to be involved in the child's case, treatment, and operate as full-partners per the Commision's guide.

In addition to involving families in the substance abuse treatment of teens, developmentally appropriate programs are of the utmost importance. Because teens neither want to be associated with children nor are as developed or mature as adults, they require not only age-specific medicinal treatment, but also development-specific paradigms for approach. "They have a developmental need to be involved as partners in their treatment planning," writes Nissen, " and often provide powerful insights into their situation that professionals might miss. Because a youth has made some bad decisions -- it doesn't mean he or she is incapable of learning and modeling better community norms given an inviting opportunity."

The APA, Medscape, Journal of Counseling and Development, Kaiser Foundation, and the U.S. Department of Education all offer a variety of expert-supported, evidence-based practices to achieve teen-appropriate involvements that not only demand the attention of the attending counselors, but fully incorporate the child into the treatment reality.

The ultimate foundational key to the mental health system for teens with substance abuse problems in drugs and under-age alcohol is engaging and retaining the teens in treatment. In many cases, particularly as a result of the juvenile justice system's involvement in teens with substance abuse problems, a teacher or judge ordering treatment does not guarantee that the teen will cooperate and carry it out. Nissen warns, "especially if a youth has had multiple previous contacts with the system, special efforts must be made to overcome cynicism and skepticism about the potential of any professional helper to tell him/her anything that he or she hasn't heard before."

Using qualified staff to address gender and cultural concerns as a source of strength and confidence and reinforcing the internal power of the individual in the teenager is an important part of the process, building on his or her strengths in order to gain emotional access to the mental disorders behind the addictions.

Teens with drug abuse and alcohol problems are in a systematic Catch-22: they are almost adults, but still children. Caught between two ages, they are also welded between two systems, that of Juvenile Justice and that of Mental Health. As a result, the Mental Health system of America is structured to include substance abuse and is a particular focal point for treatment of adolescent abuse. The mental health care system is currently in a state of transition, as fostered by the President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health exacted under the first administration of George W. Bush, that changes the structure from singular, silo-based opportunities for treatment to an integrated web of approaches that treat the whole teen, from family to person, addiction to disorder. With the support of foundations like the Carter Center and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, communities nationwide are able to put the President's challenges into action, providing a coherent, complete system of treatment for teens with substance abuse problems in the mental healthcare system.

Cocozza, J.J. & K.R. Skowyra. "Youth with mental health disorders: Issues and Emerging Responses." Juvenile Justice. Vol. 7, Iss. 1, 2000

Dennis, M.L., Dawud-Noursi, S., Muck, R.D., McDermitt, M. "The need for developing and evaluating adolescent treatment models." In S.J. Stevens & A.R. Morral (Eds.) Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment in the United States: Exemplary Models from a National Evaluation Study. Binghamton, NY: Haworth Press, 2001

Dennis, M.L. & McGeary, K.A. "Adolescent Alcohol and MarijuanaTreatment: Kids Need It Now." TIE Communique. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 1999.

Mental Health and Traumatic Events. Available Online: http://www.hhs.gov/mentalhealth/

Nissen, Laura. "Interpreting Key Elements Within a Juvenile Justice Setting." Drug Strategies: Treating Teens. Washington, D.C.: The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2004.

Nissen, L.B., J. Vanderburg, J.Embree-Bever, J. Mankey. "Strategies for Integrating Substance Abuse Treatment in the Juvenile Justice System: A Practice Guide." Washington, DC: Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 1999.

Schiraldi, V., B. Holman, and P. Beatty. "Poor Prescription: The Costs of Imprisoning Drug Offenders in the United States." Washington, DC: Justice Policy Institute. 2000.

Staten Island Mental Health Society. Available Online: http://www.simhs.org/index.html

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. " Substance Abuse Help For the Family." Responding to the President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health. Washington, DC: SAMSHA, 2005.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. " Substance Abuse Treatment in Adult and Juvenile Correctional Facilities." Findings from the Uniform Facility Data Set, 1997 Survey of Correctional Facilities. Washington, DC: SAMSHA, 1997.

Teens and Mental Health. Available Online:

http://www.athealth.com/Practitioner/Newsletter/FPN_7_8.html

Torbet, P. "Holding Juvenile Offenders Accountable: Programming Needs of Juvenile Probation Departments." Pittsburgh, PA: National Center for Juvenile Justice, 1999.

U.S. Department and Health and Human Services. Available Online:

http://www.health.org/features/youth/

U.S. Dept. Of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. "Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report." Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, 1999.

Nissen, Laura. "Interpreting Key Elements Within a Juvenile Justice Setting." Drug Strategies: Treating Teens. Washington, D.C.: The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2004.

Ibid, p. 2.

Ibid, p. 2.

Dennis, M.L., Dawud-Noursi, S., Muck, R.D., McDermitt, M. "The need for developing and evaluating adolescent treatment models." In S.J. Stevens & A.R. Morral (Eds.) Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment in the United States: Exemplary Models from a National Evaluation Study. Binghamton, NY: Haworth Press, 2001. p. 13.

Dennis, M.L. & McGeary, K.A. "Adolescent Alcohol and MarijuanaTreatment: Kids Need It Now." TIE Communique. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 1999. p. 11.

Cocozza, J.J. & K.R. Skowyra. "Youth with mental health disorders: Issues and Emerging Responses." Juvenile Justice. Vol. 7, Iss. 1, 2000.… [END OF PREVIEW] . . . READ MORE

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