Merchants and Traders Term Paper

Pages: 8 (2259 words)  ·  Bibliography Sources: 1+  ·  Level: College Senior  ·  Topic: American History  ·  Buy This Paper

SAMPLE EXCERPT:

[. . .] As a result of non-importation agreements, the Stamp Act was appealed, due to appeals from British merchants who were losing money by shipping goods to a place that would not receive them. In addition, the customs offices in the colonies were unable to tax goods that were not allowed to enter the colonies and were never sold.

The Boston merchants and traders created an agreement against trading with England. The non-importation agreement stated:

We, the subscribers, in order to relieve the trade under those discouragements, to promote industry, frugality, and economy, and to discourage luxury, and every kind of extravagance, do promise and engage to and with each other as follows:

First, That we will not send for or import from Great Britain, either upon our own account, or upon commission, this fall, any other goods than what are already ordered for the fall supply.

Secondly, That we will not send for or import any kind of goods or merchandize from Great Britain, either on our own account, or on commissions, or any otherwise, from the 1st of January 1769, to the 1st of January 1770, except salt, coals, fish hooks and lines, hemp, and duck bar lead and shot, woolcards and card wire.

Thirdly, That we will not purchase of any factor, or others, any kind of goods imported from Great Britain, from January 1769, to January 1770.

Fourthly, That we will not import, on our own account, or on commissions or purchase of any who shall import from any other colony in America, from January 1769, to January 17-70, any tea, glass, paper, or other goods commonly imported from Great Britain.

Fifthly, That we will not, from and after the 1st of January 1769, import into this province any tea, paper, glass, or painters colours, until the act imposing duties on those articles shall be repealed."

This non-importation agreement turned out to be one of the most successful in history. Non-importation agreements spread through the other colonies like wildfire. England was forced to abolish many of its acts against the colonies.

Conclusion

Relations between the colonists and England got worse and worse from the period between 1763-1775, during which Parliament passed a number of laws to increase England's income from the colonies. The colonists were furious and took drastic measures to stop this from happening. They lived far from Britain and were more independent. These new British policies threatened their newfound freedom. In late 1774, England's King George III stated, "The die is now cast, the colonies must either submit or triumph." Shortly afterwards, the Revolutionary War broke out.

The American War of Independence lasted from 1775 to 1785. As a result of this war, and the American government was established through the Constitution of the United States in 1787. The war basically achieved independence from Great Britain by the colonies and created a new republican form of government, in which The American people held the power.

The economic changes seen by the merchants and traders of the American Revolution provided a strong foundation for an independent nation with representative political institutions.

The Revolutionary period was an exciting and productive time for the merchants and traders of America. The American Revolution basically put an end to two centuries of British rule in the colonies and created the modern United States of America, which is based on commerce and trade.

Bibliography

American Revolution. World Book Encyclopedia. Chicago:World Book Inc. 1997, pp. 270-274.

Bailyn, Bernard. The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution. Cambridge: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1967.

Goldfield, David etal. The American Journey: A History of the Untied States. New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 1998, pp. 130-153.

Gorn, Elliot J., Roberts, Randy and Blizhar, Terryt. Constructing the American Past: A Source Book of a People's History - Volume I. 3rd ed. New York: Longman, 1999.

Norton, Mary Beth, et al. A People and a Nation: A History of the United States - Volume A: To 1877. 5th ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1999.

Merchants and Traders of the American Revolution

American Revolution. World Book Encyclopedia. Chicago:World Book Inc. 1997, pp. 270.

Bailyn, Bernard. The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution. Cambridge: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1967.

World Book Encyclopedia.

Goldfield, David etal. The American Journey: A History of the Untied States. New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 1998, pp. 130-153.

Bailyn.

Bailyn, p. 298.

Norton, Mary Beth, et al. A People and a Nation: A History of the United States - Volume A: To 1877. 5th ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin,… [END OF PREVIEW]

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