Essay: National Security Implications of Transnational

Pages: 9 (3380 words)  ·  Bibliography Sources: 10  ·  Level: Master's  ·  Topic: Terrorism  ·  Buy This Paper

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[. . .] S. banks. China is trying to steal patents and U.S. technology that companies keep in their sites and in their computers, and the attack on Government increased almost nine fold, to "48,562 in fiscal 2012 from 5,503 in 2006.

Thus Afghanistan, Pakistan, or the region in terms of stability and U.S. concerns, and from Afghanistan the post-withdrawal relationship with the governments involved, the level of development and security it desires, and what kind of peace are not clear. Afghanistan is one example where making and arming insurgents have made the proverbial finger poke the eye. This type of criminals is entering the U.S. As legal and illegal immigrants too.

Illegal Immigrants and Crime

Illegal immigration also causes burdens in the economy and affects national safety. This issue began with the September terrorist attack, and the immigration problem goes back to January 2004, when President Bush wanted to change the immigration laws, thus giving amnesty to three million illegal immigrants. "Mr. Bush asked Congress to create a guest worker program. Immigrants would be authorized as guest workers for three years, then required to return home."

The problem became acute by 2005 with illegal immigration becoming a problem in Arizona and Georgia, and after that a bill that would grant citizenship for illegal immigrants with the guest worker program was introduced. It did not get passed. By 2007, President Bush again took the initiative resulting in a comprehensive method of giving citizenship for illegal immigrants after fees and other penalties. While the federal bills were stalled, states made over "206 laws related to immigration in 2008."

The problems are different with rogue nations. Immigrants from these nations also may pose a threat.

They have a direct connection with the parent transnational crime organization and often carry out the orders of the chiefs abroad by acting inside the U.S. For example after the advent of Islamic terrorism, international crime syndicates have taken a very different turn. They use immigrants to carry For example the conviction and a case where immigrants -- mostly illegal immigrants of fundamental Islamic leanings have plotted the attack of an army base. It was proved by the terrorism unit that three persons Dritan and Shain Duka the Duka brothers, who are illegal immigrants and Shnewer tried to purchase AK47 rifles and other fire arm.

In 2007 under surveillance, Dritan and Shain Duka were meeting a confidential government witness to purchase four automatic M-16 rifles and three semi-automatic AK-47 rifles to be used in a future attack on military personnel. The jury during the trial "viewed secretly recorded videotapes of the defendants performing small-arms training at a shooting range in the Pocono Mountains in Pennsylvania and watching training videos amongst themselves that included depictions of American soldiers being killed and of known foreign Islamic radicals urging jihad against the United States."

This is what we understand in the proceedings of the trial as reported by the justice department.

Strategy to Combat Transnational Organized Crime:

For the immigrant issue, The Secure Communities program has been started that is used for deporting dangerous immigrants. Under the program, all arrestees' fingerprints are shared with Immigration and Customs Enforcement. There are many who claim that the program failed to track down or deport dangerous immigrants. In reverse, those deported under the program were not convicts or were guilty of only minor crimes. The Assembly by passing the TRUST Act by a 43-22 vote would allow only the fingerprints of convicted felons be run through federal databases and change the way California counties participate in Secure Communities.

Internationally there has been large scale operations by the U.S. And allied nations in fighting criminal organizations around the world. The U.S. felled the La Cosa Nostra, Medellin and Cali Cartels -- and even the FARC -- "prove that it is possible to constrain, shrink, disrupt and dismantle criminal and insurgent groups once considered to be untouchable."

Thus the strategies are multidimensional because as of today the transnational crime is more complicated because they use sophisticated tactics. They use the trading, transportation, and transactional systems for criminal purposes, and the defense consist of creating international awareness about the reality of the threat and get nations for cooperating on a multilateral platform reducing the access for these elements in the infrastructure; shrink their hold in national security, and governance; and using law enforcement action along with the establishment of a "Threat Mitigation Working Group to identify those TOC networks that present a sufficiently high national security threat as to merit the focused use of complementary law enforcement and non-law enforcement assets and that may be vulnerable to whole-of-government responses."

Thus the U.S. will take in partners for the control of corruption and instability and destroy the economic power of transnational criminal networks and thus ensure the safety and security of Americans and U.S. national security interests.

Internationally the nations must confront countries like North Korea because North Korea uses sovereignty to hide the "regime from intrusive acts that may compromise its externally directed criminal activities and which are perpetrated by the organs, institutions, and personnel."

Thus there ought to be international action by all countries and it is suggested that the United Nations be used to curb the transnational crimes.

Conclusion

Thus the national Security, second the crime - organized in many ways, and the third rogue nations that pose a threat. It must be remembered that the Al-Qaeda was also an organized crime syndicate that was funded by the drug trade from Afghanistan. Secondly organized crimes committed by the companies or organizations that commit crime like ENRON also have its own implications on the financial security. Some of the local organized mafias also have foreign links either to harbor funds that are ill gotten or for tax evasion and thus crime runs parallel to terrorism and national threats. The modern day transnational organized crime are based on the system of self-perpetuating associations of individuals who operate transnationally for obtaining a gain mainly by illegal means, while protecting their activities through a pattern of corruption and/or violence, and/or a transnational organizational structure using commerce or communication mechanisms. One remedy is to make the corporate more transparent it is possible to reduce the crime and the use of such structures by the transnational criminal.

The second is to deal with the rogue nation. The rogue nation itself indulges in crime. They have a direct patronage of the organization or sponsor the connection with the parent transnational crime organization and often carry out the orders of the chiefs abroad by acting inside the U.S. For example, after the advent of Islamic terrorism, international crime syndicates has taken a very different turn. Internally some programs like the Secure Communities program has been started that is used for deporting dangerous immigrants. The strategy ought to be multidimensional because as of today the transnational crime is more complicated because they use sophisticated tactics. The solution lies in the direct confrontation of nations like North Korea because North Korea uses sovereignty to hide the criminal organs, institutions, and personnel and it is suggested that the force of the United Nations be used to curb the transnational crimes. International laws also could be considered.

Bibliography

Ambinder, Marc. "Did America's Cyber Attack on Iran Make Us More Vulnerable? The Atlantic" Accessed April 30, 2013. http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2012/06/did-americas-cyber-attack-on-iran-make-us-more-vulnerable/258120/

Cordesman, Anthony H. "Negotiating with the Taliban: Six Critical Conditions that Must Be Met to Avoid Another "Peace to End All Peace" Accessed April 30, 2013.

http://csis.org/publication/negotiating-taliban-six-critical-conditions-must-be-met-avoid-another-peace-end-all-peac

Czerwonka, Michal. "Immigration and Emigration" The New York Times, pp: 4-5.

Engleman, Eric. "China, Iran Boost Cyber Attacks on U.S., Lawmaker Says Stephen Morton" Bloomberg, Accessed April 30, 2013. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-02-14/china-iran-boost-cyber-attacks-on-u-s-lawmaker-says.html

Hernandez, Sandra. "Immigration reform: Secure Communities and California's push to limit its impact" Los Angeles Times, p: 7.

Katzman, Kenneth. "Afghanistan: Current Issues and U.S. Policy Brief Record Statistics" Foreign Affairs, Defence, and Trade Division UNT Libraries Government Documents Department, Accessed April 30, 2013. http://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4921/

Neighbourhoodsout. "Los Angeles crime rates" Accessed April 30, 2013.

http://www.neighborhoodscout.com/ca/los-angeles/crime/

Price, Marilyn; Norris, Donna M. "White-Collar Crime: Corporate and Securities and Commodities Fraud" J. Am Acad Psychiatry Law, 37 (2009):538-544.

Rexton, Paul; Bechtol, Kan Bruce E; Collins, Jr. Robert M. "Understanding North Korea's illicit international activities" Accessed April 30, 2013. http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/download.cfm?q=975

Simpson, Sally S; Koper, Christopher S. "Deterring Corporate Crime" Criminology, 30, (2006): 347 -- 376.

White House. "The United States Strategy to Combat Transnational Organized Crime" Accessed April 30, 2013. http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/nsc/transnational-crime/definition

White House, "The United States Strategy to Combat Transnational Organized Crime," Accessed April 30, 2013. http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/nsc/transnational-crime/definition

Neighbourhoodsout, "Los Angeles crime rates," Accessed April 30, 2013.

http://www.neighborhoodscout.com/ca/los-angeles/crime/

Kenneth Katzman, "Afghanistan: Current Issues and U.S. Policy Brief Record Statistics" Foreign Affairs, Defence, and Trade Division UNT Libraries Government Documents Department, Accessed April 30, 2013.

http://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4921/

Kenneth Katzman, "Afghanistan: Current Issues and U.S. Policy Brief Record Statistics"

Anthony H. Cordesman, "Negotiating with the Taliban: Six Critical Conditions that Must Be Met to Avoid Another "Peace to End All Peace," Accessed… [END OF PREVIEW]

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