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Nursing Best PracticesEssay

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Nursing Philosophy

The author of this report has been asked to answer several questions about personal beliefs and values. The author will also cover viewpoints that relate to the nursing paradigm. This paradigm relates to things such as person, environment, health and nursing. It will also be defined what defines nursing and the implications that exist relating to society at large. Ancillary or very involved topics would include religion, ethics, morality and so forth. While forcing and foisting values and viewpoints on others is less than wise, there are certain ethics that should always be upheld and there is nothing wrong with keeping personal values and convictions so long as it does not hurt or impede quality of care.

Questions Answered

A phisophy is a general credo or belief structure that drives someone and what they do. Of course, there can be two or more dimensions to such philosophy as what is enforced during practice may or may not differ somewhat from what a person personally believes. However, those two mindsets can cross paths and sometimes in very negative ways. For example, a Christian nurse that treats a known atheist differently than a fellow Christian is crossing moral, ethical and probably legal lines as well. However, to suggest that religious people always or even mostly allow this happenstance to occur is simply not true or supported by the evidence. Many hospitals are religiously affiliated and they usually do not hide it but they make every effort to avoid that hurting the care of people that they may disagree with.

Regarding the enduring values and philosophy that drives the author of this report, it would be that the author simply wants to help heal or at least assist those that are in mental, physical or medial anguish. This can be the patients themselves as well as the friends and family of those that are in need of assistance. It can be the doting father that is worried about his new child or the mother of that child or it can be the grown children of an elderly patient that is suffering through one or more afflictions. Irrespective of how the situation manifests, the author wants to do as much as is possible to soothe and help these people while at the same time doing so for as many people as is possible without running afoul of quality or ethical standards.

Of course, nursing is all about helping and soothing. This is really true of the entire medical field and is certainly not limited to nurses. It also includes doctors and even administrative staff that keeps the office moving and running as efficiently as possible so that providers are paid and patients are only billed what is allowed and proper given the legal, insurance and other limitations and standards that are involved. Many people assert that healthcare is a right. While some may squabble about that, the author of this report full feels that everyone has a right to quality care and whatever flexibilities and such that are needed to enforce that should be done. The problem is that society seems, at least anecdotally and based on the media, to becoming more self-centered and selfish. While the "if it bleeds, it leads" mentality of the press and other parts of society may be unfairly influencing that paradigm, it is hard to remain confident and upbeat given all the negative actions and negativity that exists. Regardless of the true state of affairs, the medical professionals of the world have a duty to deliver good care with a smile even if the world would assail them or each other. The quality of care from a car accident should be the same as those that are injured in a gun battle. Nurses and phsyicians cannot and should not choose sides as they typically do not know all the facts and it's not really relevant to the situation anyway, at least from a medical perspective. Sure, if a victim and an assailant are in the ER at the same time and only one can be treated fully, the victim should get the first attempt but it's rarely that dire and thus is really not an issue. Even if it was, the Christian (and even the ethical) way to proceed is to do the best for everyone involved.

Before getting into the nursing meta-paradigm, it would be important to first define precisely what a meta-paradigm is. As defined by an online dictionary that the author of this report found, a meta-paradigm is "a set of concepts and propositions that sets forth the phenomena with which a discipline is concerned." It goes on to say "a meta-paradigm is the most general statement of a discipline and functions as a framework in which the most restricted structures of conceptual models develop (TFD, 2015). What this basically means is the general statements, ethics and rules that usually hold true. Of course, generalizations are always proven false by at least some (if not many) outliers, but the statements that hold true most of the time are ones that can generally be kept and followed. For example, and to use a generic example, stealing is generally considered wrong but if someone is stealing a loaf of bread to feed themselves because they are starving then that changes the discussion. As such, it would be fair to say that stealing is generally wrong but it would not be fair to say that it is wrong with absolutely no exception because the latter statement is not true for most people.

As it relates the nursing meta-paradigm, there is indeed a struggle because many feel that good medical care is only for the rich and the entitled. While there may be limited instances of the rich getting treated like royalty, the Hippocratic oath (not to mention the legal burden to treat those in imminent danger of dying) runs roughshod over that. Even so, there is no doubt that society has become extremely adversarial along lines such as class, income, race, gender and so forth. This manifests not only healthcare but is very easy to see when looking at healthcare. The recent events surrounding Hobby Lobby, Sandra Fluke, the Affordable Care Act (aka ObamaCare) and others prove that in spades. Health is much more complex than whether one can access care as many diseases that are very ubiquitous right now are brought on by years (if not decades) of self-abuse and bad habits. The four main parts of life, those being person, environment, health and nursing all contribute to that but the first two in particular are the main cause of such things as diabetes, heart disease and so forth. Genetics play a role and can cause a predisposition to certain problems, but nothing is truly set in stone a lot of the time and nurses play a large part in helping rewrite the future for patients. Even so, nurses and doctors cannot force people to make the right choices. They can only be given information and education and hope for the best. Indeed, obesity rates have fallen quite a lot for precisely that reason but they remain stubbornly high with the poor and less educated although this can vary and it this is changing with time (FRAC, 2015; CDC, 2015)

However, while it is stated by many, including the author of this report, that the worldview of a nurse or other medical professional does not or should not matter, it can certainly matter a great deal. Racial, religious and other similar animosities can greatly influence why people do things and how they do them and medical care is no different. Ethical nurses and doctors do not let this happenstance come to pass as they do the right thing even if they have to bite their tongue as they do it. Even so, while some may want to make exceptions or considerations based on criminal or other behavior, no such consideration is warranted or proper based on things that have nothing to do with the situation at hand or how the patients got there. The roles of nursing include medical care, assisting the doctor, following protocols and soothing the patient/family/friends. The nurse has a responsibility to give quality and timely care to the client. For society, they need to portray that while they certainly have their own personal viewpoints and worldview (and they have that right), they will not let that interfere with the generally accepted and required ethics of care. They have a duty to a professional practice to do as they are told but without compromising the above as the "just following orders" response is not always enough. All of the above interrelates in that personal and professional entanglements always bounce off of each other but the right thing needs to be done at all times.

Conclusion

In the end, the meta-paradigm as interpreted and reacted to above is echoed by scholarly research as well. There is a way to take Christian ethics too… [END OF PREVIEW]

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