Essay: Organizational Analysis -- Hope Hospice

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[. . .] The application of these two fundamental principles has enabled Beckworth to add many new programs to the flagship hospice program. Several new programs of care are listed here:

Hope Select Care. This program is an all-inclusive program for independent living by people aged 55 years or older.

Hope Connections. This program is also an independent living program, but it is geared toward people who are aged 60 years or older -- who often live in rural areas -- and it is home-based.

Hope Choices. Supported by Medicaid and the Florida Department of Elder Affairs, this program serves people aged 65 or older who wish to remain at home for long-term care.

Hope Kids Care. This program provides support for children who are grieving, either because of their own serious illness or because a loved one is ill or dying.

Hope Comfort Care. This is a program for managing symptoms and providing counseling to people -- regardless of age -- who may have a serious illness.

Hope Healing Hearts. Counseling and support for people who have lost a loved one are provided through this program.

Hope Parkinson Program. This program provides services and activities to help people with Parkinson disease -- and their caregivers -- to live a full and enriched life.

Technology accelerators. Beckworth has not been a stranger to technological advances, either in the actual care of clients or in the agency infrastructure for tracking client care plan implementation and insurance billing, and the like. Beckworth clearly views technology as a support to what Hope Hospice does, and not as a driver of her agency.

The flywheel and the doom loop. Beckworth worked daily to add to the scope and form of Hope Hospice. She kept her vision in her mind's eye and applied the discipline she had practiced in her academic programs while studying social work. She acted consistently on her faith -- that she could do this thing -- and on her focus that there was one thing that she could better than anything in the world. By keeping to the path, Beckworth was able to avoid the doom loop. Had she not kept her vision clearly front and center, any one of the following could have distracted her from her goal and her vision: (a) Reacting to internal or external forces without understanding them; (b) following some new fad, leader, or program; (c) an inability to establish or maintain momentum; and (d) a prevalence of disappointing results that ultimately bring the agency back to a position in which they react without understanding the dynamics surrounding that decision to react.

A high level of greatness. Beckworth and Hope Hospice have achieved a high level of greatness. This is demonstrated partly through the many awards that Beckworth has been given and the many recognitions she has received. Working in the area of hospice care is difficult and requires effort when acknowledgement does not materialize, or when the reward is simply gratitude. Beckworth tackled an area that is easily pushed into the background by society and brought it into the light. The National Association of Social Workers (2004) lists the following national and international recognitions of Beckworth's work in the area of hospice care.

Stevie Awards for Women in Business-International Lifetime Achievement Award, 2009

Alumni Medalist Award - The Ohio State University Alumni Association, 2009

The National Association of Social Workers Social Work Pioneer®, 2007

The Ohio State University College of Social Work Hall of Fame, 2007

APEX Award: Tribute to an Outstanding Woman in Business, Greater Fort Myers Chamber of Commerce, 2007

Summary

The key to Collins' framework is a strong entrepreneurial sense and an understanding of the quality improvement process. This combination melds the innovative mindset with standards that are based on performance measures. Hope Hospice is posed to make changes in synchrony with an evolving domestic healthcare scenario. In addition, the horizon holds opportunity for continued expansion of Hope Hospice. The challenge will be for Beckworth and Hope Hospice to remain firmly focused on their mission and values, as corporate pressures often erode the honorable positions of all but the most staunchly dedicated, clear-headed, and ethical leaders.

Conclusions

Samira Beckworth applied her training in social work and her conviction that a better system of care and support could be provided to people who are seriously ill or dying. An innovator with an entrepreneurial spirit, Beckworth displayed the high values and dogged determination that great leadership requires. Her leadership can be said to be transformational in the area of hospice care. When the growth of the agency is analyzed using Collins' framework, it precisely matches many of the steps recognized to be inherent to effective change efforts.

References

Bauer, K. (2004). Strategic alignment pyramid. [In Quality Assessment: Process or Outcome? The use of performance indicators for quality assessment in Dutch health care. Quality Digest, 2005, October 28.] Retrieved http://www.qualitydigest.com/inside / fda-compliance-article/quality-assessment-process-or-outcome

Buckingham, M. And Coffman, C. (1999). First, break all the rules: What the world's greatest managers do differently. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster.

Collins, J.C. (2001). Good to great. New York, NY: HarperCollins Publishers.

Deming, W.E. (2000). The new economics for industry, government, education, (2nd ed.), MIT Press.

Donabedian, A. (1988). The quality of care, Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA), 260 (12), 1743. Retrieved http:/ / www.jama.ama.assn.org/content/260/12/1742

Gladwell, M. (2002). Blink. New York, NY: Back Bay Books, Little, Brown and Company.

Maney, K. (2009, September 20) How Collins describes good-to-great framework . USA Today.

Meijer, W.J., and Vermeij, D.J.B. (1996). A comprehensive model of cooperation between caregivers related to quality of care. International Journal for Quality in Health Care, 9 (1), pp. 23-33. Retrieved http://intqhc.oxfordjournals.org/content/9/1/23.abstract?ck=nck

NASW Social Work Pioneers®, NASW Foundation National Programs. (2004). National Association of Social Workers. Retrieved http://www.naswfoundation.org/

pioneers/b/beckwith.html

Rogers, E.M. (2003). Diffusion of innovations (5th ed). New York, NY: Free Press.

Senge, P.M. (2006). The fifth discipline: The art and… [END OF PREVIEW]

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