Essay: How Prenatal Care Can Help Promote Infant Health

Pages: 4 (1337 words)  ·  Bibliography Sources: 4  ·  Level: Master's  ·  Topic: Health - Public Health Issues  ·  Buy This Paper

SAMPLE EXCERPT:

[. . .] 4).

• Increased likelihood of breastfeeding. The results of a study by Godin and Alton (2015) found that community-based prenatal programs were effective in educating pregnant women concerning breastfeeding benefits and techniques, and researchers have confirmed a link between prenatal exposure to breastfeeding information and expression of intent to breastfeed.

There are also a number of barriers to access to prenatal care, though, that serve to increase the likelihood that women will receive the care they need during this critical period in their lives (Cook & Selig, 2009). Such barriers include the fear of others learning that they are pregnant, a lack of access to transportation for clinical appointments, as well as various intrapersonal and health care system constraints (Cook & Selig, 2009). In addition, despite the growing body of evidence concerning the importance of the provision of prenatal care throughout women's pregnancies, there remains a dearth of timely and relevant studies concerning the impact that prenatal programs have on women's knowledge about healthy pregnancies as well as the quality and efficacy of community-based prenatal programs (Godin & Alton, 2015).

A useful evidence-based framework in which the provision of prenatal care can be provided and its effectiveness measured using the Quality of Prenatal Care Questionnaire was developed by Renfrew, Mcfadden, Bastos et al. (2014) that includes five components: (1) practice categories, (2) organization of care, (3) philosophy of care, (4) values of care providers, and (5) care provider characteristics. According to Sword and Heaman (2015), "The essential aspects within these domains are good quality clinical care, communication, education, information, and respect" (p. 438). The Quality of Prenatal Care Questionnaire also has demonstrated cross-cultural reliability and validity (Sword & Heaman, 2015).

The frequency of prenatal care visits varies depending on trimester, with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office on Women's Health recommending that pregnant women complete about one visit per month during the first trimester, twice a month during the second trimester and on a weekly basis during the third trimester to birth (Prenatal care fact sheet, 2016). Clinic visits during the later stages of pregnancy typically require less time, but clinicians will still complete several screening tests during these visits to monitor the health of mother and infant (Prenatal care fact sheet, 2016). Pregnant women are counseled to keep all clinic appointments even if they are otherwise feeling healthy (Prenatal care fact sheet, 2016).

Conclusion

The research showed that the leading cause of infant mortality worldwide is low preterm birth weight. The research was also consistent in stressing the importance of regular prenatal care for all women throughout the duration of their pregnancies. Women are advised to seek prenatal care as soon as they suspect they are pregnant and to keep all clinic appointments even if they are feeling healthy. During these visits, mothers are given a number of imaging, blood and urine, screening tests to monitor their health and the health of their infant. The frequency of prenatal care was also shown to vary according to trimester, with health care providers recommending that pregnant women complete one visit per month during the first trimester, twice a month during the second trimester and on a weekly basis during the third trimester to birth.

References

Cook, C. A. & Selig, K. L. (2009, March). Access barriers and the use of prenatal care by low-income, inner-city women. Social Work, 44(2), 129-131.

Godin, K. M. & Alton, G. D. (2015, September 1). Knowledge change associated with participation in prenatal education programs in Ontario: A cohort study. Canadian Journal of Public Health, 106(6), 401-405.

Jafari, F. & Eftekhar, H. (2010, April 1). Does group prenatal care affect satisfaction and prenatal care utilization in Iranian pregnant women? Iranian Journal of Public Health, 39(2), 52-55.

Prenatal care. (2016). March of Dimes. Retrieved from http://www.marchofdimes.org/ pregnancy/prenatal-care.aspx.

Prenatal care fact sheet. (2016). U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved from http://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/prenatal-care.html.

Renfrew, M. J., Mcfadden, A., Bastos, M. H. et al. (2014). Midwifery and quality care: Findings from a new evidence-informed framework… [END OF PREVIEW]

Health Threats in Turkey Term Paper


Prenatal Care and Health Care Access Term Paper


Health Maintenance Organization Impact on the Minorities Thesis


Promoting Breastfeeding: Centering Pregnancy Model Essay


Low Health Literacy Term Paper


View 57 other related papers  >>

Cite This Essay:

APA Format

How Prenatal Care Can Help Promote Infant Health.  (2016, September 19).  Retrieved October 19, 2019, from https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/prenatal-care-help-promote-infant-health/1326851

MLA Format

"How Prenatal Care Can Help Promote Infant Health."  19 September 2016.  Web.  19 October 2019. <https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/prenatal-care-help-promote-infant-health/1326851>.

Chicago Format

"How Prenatal Care Can Help Promote Infant Health."  Essaytown.com.  September 19, 2016.  Accessed October 19, 2019.
https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/prenatal-care-help-promote-infant-health/1326851.