Term Paper: Princess Diana and President Clinton

Pages: 7 (2361 words)  ·  Bibliography Sources: 1+  ·  Level: College Senior  ·  Topic: American History  ·  Buy This Paper

SAMPLE EXCERPT:

[. . .] The fundamental difference between Diana and Bill Clinton would appear to be one of birth and of circumstance. Diana was born as a noble woman, eligible for marriage to a prince.

This in itself reinforces the public paradigm of fairy princess, a legacy that follows her to this day, years after her death. Diana represented a fantasy in a world much to filled with the harshest of reality. It seems the public needed her, like a kind of magic wand, to take away all the pain that living can entail. When life and reality hurt even her, public sympathy burned all the stronger. Although the fantasy waned as scandals came to light, the way in which Diana dealt with these brought about rapid forgiveness from a public eager to resume the dream with the main character as a fantasy princess. Thus it seems that, despite media vulgarity, the public was quick to put a positive face on whatever Diana went through. Her husband, the royal family and the press were all to blame for Diana's problems in the view of the public. Diana then was also responsible for the lowest ever public opinion of the royal family (Supance, 2002).

Bill Clinton in contrast is from a much different background. Being an American president, there is no paradigm of fantasy involved in his position. Also, being a man, he is seen as the aggressor rather than the victim in terms of sexual indiscretion. Thus the fiasco with Monica Lewinsky was much more prominent in the public eye than Diana's indiscretions. Diana in fact was viewed as the victim of Charles's sexual indiscretion rather than vice versa. So it appears that the general opinion of Bill Clinton is much lower than that of Diana. This is however largely due to factors beyond either Diana or Clinton's control rather than due to any actual merits possessed by either person.

The fact is that both Diana and Clinton are human. Any extra opinions attached to either is due to popular opinion and the luck of being in the right place at the right time. Diana was both. Her fairy princess status came as a result of being "rescued" from a relatively obscure existence as a nursery school teacher. In contrast to this, Bill Clinton worked for his position as president with the help of advisors such as Dick Morris. His position was not granted to him either by birth or by luck, but by work resulting in the preference of the majority of voters. While Diana attained her position by birth on the other hand, she never failed to work towards her goals. In this way she achieved the public favor.

The role and manner of Diana's death should also not be overlooked in its contribution the reputation enjoyed by the late princess today. She was seen as the leading victim of all victims, paying the ultimate price for simply wanting to be left alone to live her life. All of the other factors that endeared her to the public came to a climax when Diana died. In death, she was seen as representative and benevolent towards all who suffer and die namelessly. Her death was seen almost as poetry.

Bill Clinton on the other hand is very much alive to continue making mistakes in his attempt to leave a legacy. Whereas Diana's legacy appears effortless, although tragic, Clinton's effort appears to take much more. His enemies and his former friends also appear to be much more eager to hurt his reputation for the sake of a best-selling book. The same is true of Diana, yet the aura surrounding her, and reinforced by her death, appears to shield her from all libel or slander. Bill Clinton thus appears to be very much at a disadvantage compared to Diana.

In conclusion, whatever reputation is currently enjoyed by either Diana or Clinton, both personalities are surrounded by a large amount of gossip and speculation. Some of this is positive and some negative, and perhaps this is what ultimately makes each of them human.

Bibliography

Blystone, Richard. (1997). "Diana: Reporter Reflections." Cable News Network, Inc. http://www.cnn.com/WORLD/9708/diana/

Bowman, Marion. (1998). "Folklore: Diana, Princess of Wales." Folklore Society.

Jet. (2002, Nov. 11). "Bill Clinton inducted into Arkansas Black Hall of Fame." Johnson Publishing Co.

Rush, Paul.

2003, Sept. 2). "Morris Calls for Heads to Roll." Insight on the News. News World Communications, Inc.

Supance, Lauren. (2002). "Diana, Princess of Wales." St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture.

York, Byron. (2001, Oct. 15). "Master of His Game - Bill Clinton talks on, and talks on." National Review. National Review, Inc.

Works Cited

Bowman, Marion. (1998). "Folklore: Diana, Princess of Wales." Folklore Society.

Jet. (2002, Nov. 11). "Bill Clinton inducted into Arkansas Black Hall of Fame." Johnson Publishing Co.

Rush, Paul.

2003, Sept. 2). "Morris Calls for Heads to Roll." Insight on the News. News World Communications, Inc.

Supance, Lauren. (2002). "Diana, Princess of Wales." St.… [END OF PREVIEW]

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