How Governments Shape Public Opinion Answers

Pages: 5 (1367 words)  ·  Bibliography Sources: 2  ·  File: .docx  ·  Level: College Junior  ·  Topic: Government  ·  Written: December 10, 2018

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[. . .] ” Thus, one can see that the Anti-Federalists saw ahead of time that there would be a shift away from American democracy via judicial tyranny. It was just one more way for the wealthy class to call the shots as they would ingratiate themselves with judges and presidents by way of their wealth. As Brutus foretold, “One man, or a few men, cannot possibly represent the feelings, opinions, and characters of a great multitude. In this respect, the new constitution is radically defective” (Brutus No. 3).



9. Ch. 9: Describe how governments have attempted to shape public opinion in support of the established order. Also, how have politicians and private groups used different media formats to communicate their messages and market their programs?

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Governments have attempted to shape public opinion in support of the established order primarily by using the media. Robinson (2002) calls it the “CNN effect”—the use of images and stories of human desolation typically used to garner support for humanitarian interventions abroad but also useful for rousing ire and antipathy against political opponents at home. There is a combination of media usage and soft power that goes into shaping public opinion so as to allow the established order to maintain its dominance and power structure. Isolating Assange is one example; threatening Snowden is another. Governments try to control information and who has access to information. The recent purges of conservative voices on social media platforms like YouTube and Twitter is another example. Seib (2009) notes that “the effective exercise of soft power depends largely on its being a part of a comprehensive, well-designed public diplomacy effort” (p. 780). Today’s media conglomerates are part of a large industry that is really dominated by a handful of families and corporate entities, all of whom sit on one another’s boards allowing them all to take the same actions to maintain control.

Answers on How Governments Shape Public Opinion Assignment

14. Ch. 14: How have the attacks on September 11, 2001, changed the nature of American foreign policy? What do you see as the future role of the United States in international relations? Is there a substitute for war in protecting the U.S.?



The attacks on 9/11 changed the nature of American foreign policy in a big way. First, they gave the U.S. a reason to enter into the Middle East, which they did in Afghanistan, and where they still are today. Then they used the pretext of Iraq having weapons of mass destruction to further the campaign and push it into Iraq to overthrow Saddam Hussein. Then they went after Gaddafi in Libya and then they targeted Assad in Syria. All of this was planned out years in advance by Oded Yinon’s Strategy for Israel paper in the 1980s, and the dual Israeli-American citizens in the State Department helped put this paper into effect by incorporating it into their own American foreign policy papers like A Clean Break and the Project for a New American Century. Prior to 9/11, America had only invaded the Middle East once under Bush I—and had largely kept out of the region. Afterwards, it was full-on war and regime change. Now with added sanctions leveled against Iran and more and more nations becoming frustrated with the U.S.’s use of economic warfare to push its will on the rest of the world, I expect the U.S.’s role in international relations to become diminished—barring an all out hot war in which the U.S. is able to subdue both China and Russia, who are currently helping Syria and Iran against the U.S.

References
  1. Brutus No. 3. (1787). Constitution. Retrieved from http://www.constitution.org/afp/brutus03.htm
  2. Checks and Balances: The Three Branches of the American Government. (2005). Retrieved from https://www.encyclopedia.com/politics/legal-and-political-magazines/legislative-executive-checks-and-balances
  3. Galles, G. (2008). The anti-federalists were right. Retrieved from https://mises.org/library/antifederalists-were-right
  4. Robinson, P. (2002). The CNN effect. New… [END OF PREVIEW] . . . READ MORE

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