Term Paper: Sports Betting

Pages: 6 (2592 words)  ·  Bibliography Sources: 1+  ·  Level: College Senior  ·  Topic: Sports  ·  Buy This Paper

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[. . .] "The arguments we're hearing in 2001 are exactly what moral leaders argued about in 1700" (http://www.unr.edu/alumni/profile.asp?ID=5).Manyfeel that sports gambling is a legal, moral and reasonable form of recreation that should be regulated and taxed. Furthermore many are critical of politicians from states with lotteries who advocate bans on sports betting. "The lottery is nothing more than the old illegal numbers game that they used to run in the poorer neighborhoods of the big East Coast cities," he said. "Thirty-seven state governments have lotteries. It's a tax upon those who are stupid enough to play those games" says Dick Davies (http://www.unr.edu/alumni/profile.asp?ID=5).

The National Collegiate Athletic Association officials urge to politicians to sponsor legislation that would eliminate wagering on college games in an attempt to cut down on the gambling problem on America's college campuses has heated up debates across the country (Schouten 1999). The NCAA's effort has set off a bitter political fight. Casino industry advocates from Nevada, the only state where betting on college sports is legal, argue that the NCAA is misguided in attacking the state's sports books, which they say account for a tiny fraction of sports wagering in this country. The NCAA counters that any government endorsement of collegiate sports betting could compromise the integrity of the sport (Schouten 1999). Says Davies, "Most of those folks are very conservative politically and don't understand the nature of sports gambling and see it as evil. They are fearful of fixed games but are unwilling to admit that Nevada's books are the primary defense against them" (http://www.unr.edu/alumni/profile.asp?ID=5)."We think there is betting on every college campus in this country, " said Doris Dixon, director of federal relations for the NCAA. "The numbers of betting scandals that involve point shaving and game fixing in the 1990s equal the number for every other decade combined" (Schouten 1999). But by all accounts, Nevada's sports betting represents a small fraction of sports wagering nationwide. Nevada's sports books handled about $2.3 billion in legal bets on professional and amateur athletics last year. That is dwarfed by the illegal sports betting nationwide which gambling experts estimate ranges from $40 billion to $400 billion a year (Schouten 1999).

There is a four-part test in the NCAA rulebook that student-athletes must answer when associating with somebody they're not legally or naturally dependent on: 1) Did the relationship between the athlete (or athlete's parents) and the individual providing the benefits develop as a result of the athlete's participation or notoriety related thereto? 2) Did the relationship between the athlete (or the athlete's parents) and the individual providing the benefits predate the athlete's status as a prospective student-athlete? 3) Did the relationship between the athlete (or the athlete's parents) and the individual providing the benefits predate the athlete's status achieved as a result of his or her athletic ability or reputation? 4) Was the pattern of benefits provided by the individual to the athlete (or the athlete's family) before the athlete's attainment of status as an athlete similar in nature to those provided after attaining such stature? (Obert 2000). If an athlete answers no to any of them, then there can be a problem, and some wonder if schools or athletes might soon withdraw from the orgaization. Says Arizona's Lute Olson, "Maybe they should throw the book out and start over again and probably include the No. 1 item, common sense" (Obert 2000).

NCAA spokesman Wally Renfro said that all the bylaws are put in by the member institutions to generate a level playing field and take away recruiting advantages.

Who is to say a coach wouldn't use a player's rich and famous father to lure a kid with privileges not available elsewhere? What is to stop a college coach from funneling money to a player through a longtime family friend? "I think higher education has not wanted student-athletes to be in position to be set apart from the rest of the student body," Renfro said. " That's going to happen. Nobody is naive to believe you don't have it to some degree. But that's sort of the basis for why the rules exist. You know people would be lined up to give them all kinds of perks" (Obert 2000).

Unless athletes are receiving benefits from an immediate family member or legal guardian, then they are open to question and suspension in a guilty-until-proven-innocent procedure. "It used to be you worried about illegal recruiting and kids doing well in school," said UA associate head basketball coach Jim Rosborough, who is in charge of educating the players and their parents with the compliance rules. "You had two worries.

Now, you can't turn around without worrying" (Obert 2000).

One thing is certain, and that is that this debate over sports betting is far from over. The tie between college sports and professional sports is far too tight to find a simple solution. It is a complex issue involving not only the athletes, but the schools and politicians as well. Just as sports scandals are a part of sports' history, it is certain to remain part of its future.

Works Cited

Davies, Dick. Spotlight Pofile. http://www.unr.edu/alumni/profile.asp?ID=5.

A accessed 05-12-2002).

Gopal, Arun; Pettypiece, Shannon. "Michigan considers possibility of NCAA sanctions."

University Wire. March 25, 2002. http://ask.elibrary.com/getdoc.asp?pubname=University_Wire&puburl=http~C~~S~~S~www.uwire.com&querydocid=:bigchalk:U.S.;Lib&dtype=0~0&dinst=0&author=Arun+Gopal+%26amp&title=Michigan+considers+possibility+of+NCAA+sanctions++&date=03%2D25%2D2002&query=athletes+and+gifts+from+agents&maxdoc=50&idx=31.(accessed05-12-2002).

Krystal, Becky. "Better' legislation needed in sports gambling." University Wire. http://ask.elibrary.com/getdoc.asp?pubname=University_Wire&puburl=http~C~~S~~S~www.uwire.com&querydocid=:bigchalk:U.S.;Lib&dtype=0~0&dinst=0&author=Becky+Krystal&title=COLUMN%3A+%27Better%27+legislation+needed+in+sports+gambling++&date=02%2D19%2D2002&query=athletes+and+sports+betting&maxdoc=120&idx=10.(accessed05-11-2002).

McDonald, Mark. "GAMES PEOPLE PLAY: Fabric of athletics covers Americans, for better or worse." The Dallas Morning News. January 04, 1998, pp 1A.

Obert, Richard. "NCAA PLAY BY THE RULES, OR ELSE." The Arizona Republic.

December 13, 2000, pp C1.

Schouten, Fredreka. "COLLEGIATE SPORTS BETTING BAN URGED NCAA,

CASINOS PREPARE FOR BATTLE." The Arizona Republic. November 06, 1999; pp.A2.

Strow, David. "New study confirms extent of student betting." The Washington Times.

July 09, 2000, pp A15. [END OF PREVIEW]

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Sports Betting.  (2002, May 13).  Retrieved April 22, 2019, from https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/sports-betting-discussed/6537916

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"Sports Betting."  13 May 2002.  Web.  22 April 2019. <https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/sports-betting-discussed/6537916>.

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"Sports Betting."  Essaytown.com.  May 13, 2002.  Accessed April 22, 2019.
https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/sports-betting-discussed/6537916.