Term Paper: Sustainability and Reviews the Implications

Pages: 4 (1257 words)  ·  Bibliography Sources: 4  ·  Level: College Senior  ·  Topic: Transportation - Environmental Issues  ·  Buy This Paper

SAMPLE EXCERPT:

[. . .] Whiteman (1999) describes how human behavior is influenced by a variety of communication media. She notes that companies and policy makers have increasingly turned to the deployment of spin doctors, i.e. propagandists, public relations experts, and marketers, to effectively project their message and market their side of the environmental debate. She voices concern that the messages of scientific experts can become overshadowed or manipulated. Whiteman therefore argues for the mobilization of marketing efforts among environmental scientists and academics. She makes the case for marketing for social and environmental change, which marketing shares the same fundamentals as the marketing of consumer packaged goods. Whiteman suggest the use of guerilla marketing tactics to promote a sustainability agenda.

The ability to advance sustainable human development is at least in part dependent on being able to set goals and track progress. The Global Footprint Network (2011) identifies two indicators that are useful for monitoring the human development initiative. The first indicator, ecological footprint data, reveal that given current population and available land area, an ecological footprint of less than 1.8 global hectares per person makes a country's resource demands globally replicable.

The other measurement, the United Nations' human development index (HDI) -- which measures a country's average achievements in the areas of health, knowledge, and standard of living -- tells us that an HDI higher than 0.8 is considered "high human development." Combining these two indicators produces clear minimum conditions for sustainable human development, and shows how much more progress needs to take place. In spite of growing commitments to sustainable development, most countries today do not meet both minimum requirements. As individuals, organizations, countries and regions work to advance sustainability and human development, decision makers need data and metrics to be able to set goals and track progress. Measures such as the ecological footprint and the HDI are critical to setting targets and managing development projects (Global Footprint Network, 2011).

Our investigation paper, Airlines Strict Policies: Beneficial or Not, also argues in favor of business sustainability. Even though many Airlines have policies that frustrate and alienate customers, they cannot escape the very real limitations of customer satisfaction failures. As the competition for airline travel dollars gets fiercer, companies who cannot compete on the basis of providing a quality travel experience may well find themselves in a Darwinian selection quandary. This is an appropriate outcome, their customer-unfriendly service does not meet the requirements for a sustainable business model.

As for our outside research project, Putting Out The Fire, that project argues as well building a sustainable workforce. As our paper showed, there exists a considerable amount of data supporting the premise that firefighters who smoke are at higher risk of heart attack while performing the physically demanding duties that their jobs require. A no smoking policy by local fire departments clearly contributes to a sustainable workforce by increasing firefighter longevity. Based on the preponderance of data and readings that we surveyed, one can only conclude that efforts to promote sustainability at all levels are beneficial for society.

Works Consulted

Aebi-Magee, J. 2010. What is Sustainability? What does sustainable mean? Retrieved May 5, 2011 from http://www.sustainabilitystore.com/sustainable.html

Global Footprint Network. 2011. Our human development initiative. Retrieved May 5, 2011 from http://www.footprintnetwork.org/en/index.php/GFN/page/fighting_poverty_our_human_development_initiative/

PepsiCo. 2011. Human Sustainability. Retrieved May 5, 2011 from http://www.pepsico.com/Purpose/Human-Sustainability.html

Nicholls, P. 2006. Creating a megatrend of human sustainability. Retrieved on May 5, 2011 from http://leadership.bestmanagementarticles.com/a-40350-creating-a-megatrend-of-human-sustainability.aspx

Raven, P. 2002. Science, sustainability, and the human prospect. Science, 297(5583), 954-958. Doi: 10.1126/science. 297.5583.954.

United Nations. 1987. Our Common Future, Chapter 2: Towards Sustainable Development Retrieved on May 5, 2011 from http://www.un-documents.net/ocf-02.htm

What is Sustainability. 2008. Retrieved on May 5, 2011 from http://www.interfaceglobal.com/Sustainability/What-is-Sustainability-.aspx

Whiteman, G. 1999. Sustainability for the planet: a marketing perspective. Conservation Ecology 3(1): 13. Retrieved on May 5, 2011 from:: http://www.consecol.org/vol3/iss1/art13/ [END OF PREVIEW]

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