Term Paper: Terrorism in the Book Dying

Pages: 3 (945 words)  ·  Bibliography Sources: 3  ·  Level: College Senior  ·  Topic: Terrorism  ·  Buy This Paper

SAMPLE EXCERPT:

[. . .] Ultimately, it would be helpful to prevent terrorism before it erupts by listening and responding to politically disenfranchised groups before the conflict becomes too long and drawn out.

Some types of terrorism occur not by nebulous non-state actors such as Al Qaeda but by officially recognized state powers. When governments commit acts of terror, the word terrorism is sometimes not even used because legitimacy is inferred. However, in the case with Syria, the government can easily be referred to as a terrorist organization even if it operates officially. Because terrorism is always political, it does not matter whether or not the state or a non-state organization perpetrates the terrorist acts. The responses to terrorism will always be similarly structured, targeting the root causes and preventing violent outbreaks in the future.

A comprehensive anti-terrorist strategy must also address the concern that terrorism may spread, via the contagion of a political ideology. Al Qaeda is a perfect example of how the ideology of Muslim liberation from Western state actors appeals to a wide geographic and cultural base from the Middle East to Southeast Asia (Pape, 2006). Responses to political terrorism need to be tailored to the situation. Thus, some types of terrorism may be met with an evaluation of the living conditions and political grievances of the people (as with Palestinians or Tamils, for example) with according diplomatic and strategic political responses that may never need to resort to military action. Other types of terrorism have an irrational foundation, such as that promoted by Al Qaeda and the Taliban. In those cases, military tactics are unfortunately necessary in the ongoing vigilance against global violence. Impediments to a military course of action range from human rights concerns, concerns over global hegemony via the large democratic states terrorists act against, and rising death tolls (Pape, 2006). Likewise, there are impediments to using diplomacy, including the relatively weak leadership of many terrorist organizations and the cacophony of voices on the international arena, leading to differential counterterrorism objectives.

Because each terrorist group has a different agenda, and comes from a unique cultural milieu, there will be a correspondingly large range of causes as well as manifestations of terrorism. Nationalism might be at the root of suicide terrorism, as Pape (2006) suggests, but other factors such as the desire to wrest control and power away from a perceived hegemon, seems to be the most unifying and blanket explanation for the use of terrorism. Political motivators for terrorism are likely to remain the primary causes for the use of violence, trumping other issues like culture and religion. Culture and religion might be tacitly linked to terrorist ideologies but politics will remain the primary cause -- and solution.

References

Crenshaw, M. (1981). The causes of terrorism. Comparitive Politics 13(4): 379-399.

Pape, R. (2006). Dying to Win. New York:… [END OF PREVIEW]

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"Terrorism in the Book Dying."  Essaytown.com.  February 24, 2014.  Accessed October 18, 2019.
https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/terrorism-book-dying/7558396.