Research Paper: Training Programme for Female Athlete

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¶ … Training Programme for Female Athlete

Date/Time: ____ Name:

Strength/flexibility exercises test Rubric (5%)

The instructor (NOT student) will choose 5 strength/flexibility exercises from the student's Written Report that the student states his athlete will use over the 3-month hypothetical training period. The Instructor will ask the student to perform the exercises in turn and name the muscle(s) being stretched or strengthened. This is NOT a physically demanding test (only 1 repetition is performed).

Possible

Marks

Strength/flexibility exercise 1

Conducted exercise correctly

Correctly named muscles strengthened/stretched

Strength/flexibility exercise 2

Conducted exercise correctly

0.8

Correctly named muscles strengthened/stretched

0.2

Strength/flexibility exercise 3

Conducted exercise correctly

0.8

Correctly named muscles strengthened/stretched

0.2

Strength/flexibility exercise 4

Conducted exercise correctly

0.8

Correctly named muscles strengthened/stretched

0.2

Strength/flexibility exercise 5

Conducted exercise correctly

0.8

Correctly named muscles strengthened/stretched

0.2

TOTAL

(Total marks will be rounded down (not up). For instance, if you score 4.6, your TOTAL will be recorded as 4.0)

Section: ____ ID:

Date/Time: ____ Name:

Written Report (Strength and Flexibility Training Programme for Female Athlete) Rubric (25%)

Yes

No

Possible

Marks

Created motivating exercise title, filled out assigned Cover Page correctly, and attached Rubric after Cover Page, but before Summary Page

1.0

Summary

Summarised the key features of the training programme

1.0

Summarised why these key features were emphasised

1.0

Introduction

Explained fully the benefits of strength-training

1.0

Explained fully the benefits of flexibility-training

1.0

Cited at least 4 references demonstrating the benefits of strength & flexibility training in the text using APA format

2.0

Pre-Implementation Stage

Cited at least 2 strength tests (with references)

1.0

Cited at least 2 flexibility tests (with references)

1.0

Noted areas of muscular strength needing the most improvement (and explained why)

1.0

Noted areas of muscular flexibility needing the most improvement (and explained why)

1.0

Implementation Stage

Yes

No

Possible

Marks

Outlined the full 12-week schedule for a comprehensive 12-week strength & flexibility training programme

2.0

Chose an appropriate number of muscular strength and flexibility exercises and listed the names of the exercises and muscles being strengthened/stretched

2.0

Chose an appropriate amount of frequency, intensity, and duration of muscular strength and flexibility exercises

3.0

Demonstrated how the exercise physiology principle of progression was implemented

1.0

Demonstrated how the exercise physiology principle of specificity was implemented

1.0

Demonstrated how the exercise physiology principle of dose-response relationship was implemented

1.0

Demonstrated how the exercise physiology principle of rest and recovery was implemented

1.0

Explained the likelihood of the athlete (a) implementing this 12-week programme and (b) the physiology principle of permanency at the end of the 12-week programme

1.0

References

Listed all references accurately using the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association

1.0

Structure

Correct spelling and grammar

1.0

TOTAL

Total for Strength/flexibility exercises test

Total for Written Report

Grand Total for Major Assignment

Comments

(Physical Education 2)

Section: (Type)

Major Assignment (Strength and Flexibility Training Programme

for Female Athlete)

Student Name: (Type)

Student ID: (Type)

Student Major: (Type)

Motivating Exercise Title:

Instructor: Mr. Adrian McInman

Summary

The following regimen of strength training and flexibility training exercises was designed specifically for a hypothetical 20-year-old female athlete, one who has developed an impressive level of cardiovascular training, while neglecting her strength and flexibility. The various arrangement of exercises -- including stretches, resistance training via free weights, and manual resistance training using body weight (pull-ups, push-ups), was carefully organized to accentuate the core physiological exercise principles of progression, specificity, the dose-response relationship, and rest and recovery. By beginning with relatively simple stretches and weight training routines in the first weeks of the program, and progressing to an increasingly difficult combination of sets and repetitions, the objective is to build the athlete's muscle mass and increase her strength without overloading her still-developing musculature. Each exercise is also designed to target a specific muscle group, because the concept of specificity involves utilizing different exercises to stimulate movement of joints in specific patterns which force the muscles to adapt in various ways. Furthermore, each exercise will be taught and performed using a specific form, seeking to identify the exact structural movements which serve to maximize flexibility and muscle strength gains. A respect for the tenets of the dose-response relationship will be integrated within the flexibility training and strength training regimen throughout the 12-week programme, because overloading a young athlete's muscles can easily cause harmful injuries, undue levels of soreness and muscle fatigue, and other limiting factors which would serve to undermine the trainee's personal and professional aspirations. Finally, a carefully balanced period of rest and recovery will be applied at all necessary junctures in the training, in recognition of the trainee's initial inexperience in terms of flexibility training and strength training. By resting for longer periods of time during the first few weeks of the programme, the athlete's muscles will be provided ample time to engage in the natural process of recovery which is essential when trying to truly build muscle mass and increase strength.

Introduction

The choice to live a healthier lifestyle is usually made during one's youth, through participation in sport, training in a gymnasium, and the choice to lead an active lifestyle leads directly to improved health. With obesity on the rise throughout most Western nations like United Kingdom and America, as the combination of junk food and stationary visual media creates a generation of young adults adverse to physical activity, the need to raise awareness about healthy living has never been greater. Unlike most other activities in life, exercises such as strength training and flexibility training present a positive choice with clear advantages and no drawbacks. When one becomes physically fit as an adult, the benefits also extend to emotional well-being, providing a constructive outlet for negative feelings to be released in a constructive environment. From a physiological perspective, the pursuit of daily physical activity through strength training and flexibility training is perhaps the most beneficial method available to young athletes in terms of preserving muscle mass and enhancing the body's natural ability to process caloric energy (Boone, 2013). The act of regular exercise works to build muscle strength and endurance while also honing flexibility and improving posture, and it has been consistently demonstrated through empirical research that "adequate skeletal and muscle strength are necessary for the execution of ef-cient movements, which in turn provides better quality of life and optimal performance in competitive sports" (Nobrega, Paula & Carvalho, 2005).

The term strength training has come to describe the combination of weight lifting exercises which increase muscle mass by utilizing the concept of resistance to properly induce muscle contraction (Baechle & Earle, 2008). The process of manually stimulating muscle contracting by lifting weights and engaging in similar resistance-based exercises has been proven to provide significant benefits for the skeletal muscular system, including increased muscle mass and strength and prolonged anaerobic endurance. A series of scientific advances regarding the use of anaerobic exercise like strength training have occurred during the last decade -- leading to the development of more refined strength training programs that are premised in the four fundamental exercise physiology principles: progression; specificity; dose-response relationship; and rest and recovery (Kraemer & Knuttgen, 2003). Although strength training is a pursuit typically associated with male athletes, this misconception is based primarily on the stubborn refusal to refute long-held notions regarding the societal need for women to focus their energy on building muscular strength. It has been universally determined, however, that the unique aspects of male physiology provide the source of a man's advantage in terms of absolute strength, and when alternative measures of strength are applied to men and women of similar size and stature -- such as strength relative to cross-sectional area of muscle -- the strength level of the average male and female appears to be rather equalized (Ebben & Jensen, 1998). Women who adhere to a similarly well-designed strength training regimen as that used by the majority of male athletes stand to derive significant physical benefits resulting from bone and soft-tissue modeling, increased lean body mass, decreased fat, and enhanced self-confidence (Ebben & Jensen, 1998).

Pre-Implementation Stage

Before the development of a complete strength and flexibility regimen for our 20-year-old female athlete, a thorough process of testing must take place to accurately assess her baseline strength and flexibility levels. Certain tests are used by strength and conditioning coaches, athletic trainers and other physical fitness experts as an objective method through which to identify deficits in an individual's relative level of strength and flexibility. Knowing that this particular 20-year-old athlete has specialized in cardiovascular activities during her early training, while neglecting the core elements of strength training and flexibility training, it would be advisable to begin with a perfunctory examination of her basic arm strength by utilizing a simple pull-up test. By positioning the athlete underneath a fixed horizontal bar, and asking her to perform as many traditional pull-ups (also referred to as chin-ups) while applying the resistance of her own body weight against the biceps, triceps, and trapezius muscles, it is possible to determine an effective… [END OF PREVIEW]

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Training Programme for Female Athlete.  (2013, December 15).  Retrieved July 20, 2019, from https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/training-programme-female-athlete/1913315

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"Training Programme for Female Athlete."  Essaytown.com.  December 15, 2013.  Accessed July 20, 2019.
https://www.essaytown.com/subjects/paper/training-programme-female-athlete/1913315.