Wuthering HeightsBook Report

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Wuthering

Metaphor: "it would be foolish to sit sulking for the misbehaviour of a pack of curs"

Allusion: Heathcliff is "a dark-skinned gipsy in aspect, in dress and manners a gentleman" alludes to Othello

Point-of-View: "I have just returned from a visit to my landlord -- the solitary neighbour that I shall be troubled with."

Imagery: "I paused to admire a quantity of grotesque carving lavished over the front, and especially about the principal door; above which, among a wilderness of crumbling griffins and shameless little boys, I detected the date '1500,' and the name 'Hareton Earnshaw.'"

Irony: "A perfect misanthropist's heaven."

Metaphor: "the first feathery flakes of a snow-shower" and "Vinegar-faced Joseph projected his head from a round window of the barn."

B. Allusion: "She was slender, and apparently scarcely past girlhood: an admirable form, and the most exquisite little face that I have ever had the pleasure of beholding; small features, very fair; flaxen ringlets, or rather golden, hanging loose on her delicate neck; and eyes, had they been agreeable in expression, that would have been irresistible."

C. Point-of-View: "The vehemence of my agitation brought on a copious bleeding at the nose, and still Heathcliff laughed, and still I scolded."

D. Imagery: "I saw a servant-girl on her knees surrounded by brushes and coal-scuttles, and raising an infernal dust as she extinguished the flames with heaps of cinders."

E. Foreshadowing: "Meanwhile, the young man had slung on to his person a decidedly shabby upper garment, and, erecting himself before the blaze, looked down on me from the corner of his eyes, for all the world as if there were some mortal feud unavenged between us."

Chapter 3

A. Metaphor: "a glare of white letters started from the dark, as vivid as spectres -- the air swarmed with Catherines; and rousing myself to dispel the obtrusive name…"

B. Allusion: "I was moved to rise and denounce Jabez Branderham as the sinner of the sin that no Christian need pardon."

C. Point-of-View: "I began to dream, almost before I ceased to be sensible of my locality. I thought it was morning; and I had set out on my way home, with Joseph for a guide."

D. Imagery: "perfuming the place with an odour of roasted calf-skin…It was a Testament, in lean type, and smelling dreadfully musty: a fly-leaf bore the inscription."

E. Foreshadowing: " This writing, however, was nothing but a name repeated in all kinds of characters, large and small -- Catherine Earnshaw, here and there varied to Catherine Heathcliff, and then again to Catherine Linton."

Chapter 4

A. Metaphor: " Hareton has been cast out like an unfledged dunnock," (simile)

B. Allusion: "a gift of God; though it's as dark almost as if it came from the devil."

C. Point-of-View: "Oh, I'll turn the talk on my landlord's family!' I thought to myself. 'A good subject to start! And that pretty girl-widow, I should like to know her history: whether she be a native of the country, or, as is more probable, an exotic that the surly indigenae will not recognise for kin.'."

D. Imagery: " I had a peep at a dirty, ragged, black-haired child; big enough both to walk and talk."

E. Foreshadowing: "He complained so seldom, indeed, of such stirs as these, that I really thought him not vindictive: I was deceived completely, as you will hear."

Chapter 5

A. Metaphor: "he regularly grumbled out a long string of tales against Heathcliff and Catherine"

B. Allusion: "Go, say thy prayers, child, and ask God's pardon."

C. Point-of-View: "A nothing vexed him; and suspected slights of his authority nearly threw him into fits."

D. Imagery: "A high wind blustered round the house, and roared in the chimney: it sounded wild and stormy, yet it was not cold, and we were all together"

E. Alliteration: "heaping the heaviest blame." And "commanding her companions"

Chapter 6

A. Metaphor: "a shower of glass-drops hanging in silver chains from the centre, and shimmering with little soft tapers"

B. Allusion: " I might have the privilege of flinging Joseph off the highest gable, and painting the house-front with Hindley's blood!"

C. Point-of-View: "Young Earnshaw was altered considerably in the three years of his absence. He had grown sparer, and lost his colour, and spoke and dressed quite differently."

D. Imagery: "We crept through a broken hedge, groped our way up the path, and planted ourselves on a flower-plot under the drawing-room window."

E. Motif (shoes, feet, slippers) "Afterwards, they dried and combed her beautiful hair, and gave her a pair of enormous slippers, and wheeled her to the fire; and I left her, as merry as she could be."

Chapter 7

A. Metaphor: "It's like a colt's mane over his eyes" (simile)

B. Allusion: "After playing lady's-maid to the new-comer, and putting my cakes in the oven, and making the house and kitchen cheerful with great fires, befitting Christmas-eve, I prepared to sit down and amuse myself by singing carols, all alone"

C. Point-of-View: "Hindley lifted her from her horse, exclaiming delightedly, 'Why, Cathy, you are quite a beauty! I should scarcely have known you: you look like a lady now. Isabella Linton is not to be compared with her, is she, Frances?'"

D. Imagery: "I removed the habit, and there shone forth beneath a grand plaid silk frock, white trousers, and burnished shoes."

E. Characterization: "; and, while her eyes sparkled joyfully when the dogs came bounding up to welcome her, she dared hardly touch them lest they should fawn upon her splendid garments"

Chapter 8

A. Metaphor: "she seemed in flighty spirits"

B. Allusion: "On the morning of a fine June day my first bonny little nursling, and the last of the ancient Earnshaw stock, was born"

C. Point-of-View: "And, truly, it appeared as if the lad were possessed of something diabolical at that period."

D. Imagery: "Mrs. Dean raised the candle, and I discerned a soft-featured face, exceedingly resembling the young lady at the Heights, but more pensive and amiable in expression. It formed a sweet picture. The long light hair curled slightly on the temples; the eyes were large and serious; the figure almost too graceful."

E. Characterization: "Catherine had kept up her acquaintance with the Lintons since her five-weeks' residence among them; and as she had no temptation to show her rough side in their company, and had the sense to be ashamed of being rude where she experienced such invariable courtesy, she imposed unwittingly on the old lady and gentleman by her ingenious cordiality; gained the admiration of Isabella, and the heart and soul of her brother: acquisitions that flattered her from the first -- for she was full of ambition -- and led her to adopt a double character without exactly intending to deceive any one."

Chapter 9

A. Metaphor: "There, I've found it out at last!' cried Hindley, pulling me back by the skin of my neck, like a dog," (simile)

B. Allusion: "On the contrary, I shall have great pleasure in sending it to perdition to punish its Maker,' exclaimed the blasphemer. 'Here's to its hearty damnation!'"

C. Point-of-View: "A pity,' observed I. 'You're hard to please; so many friends and so few cares, and can't make yourself content!'"

D. Imagery: "He entered, vociferating oaths dreadful to hear; and caught me in the act of stowing his son away in the kitchen cupboard."

E. Foreshadowing: "You love Mr. Edgar because he is handsome, and young, and cheerful, and rich, and loves you. The last, however, goes for nothing: you would love him without that, probably; and with it you wouldn't, unless he possessed the four former attractions."

Chapter 10

A. Metaphor: "Wuthering Heights rose above this silvery vapour; but our old house was invisible; it rather dips down on the other side."

B. Allusion: " Yes: I remember her hero had run off, and never been heard of for three years; and the heroine was married."

C. Point-of-View: "It was a deep voice, and foreign in tone; yet there was something in the manner of pronouncing my name which made it sound familiar. I turned about to discover who spoke, fearfully; for the doors were shut, and I had seen nobody on approaching the steps."

D. Imagery: "Oh, these bleak winds and bitter northern skies, and impassable roads, and dilatory country surgeons!"

E. Characterization and Foreshadowing: "There's a tigress!' exclaimed Mrs. Linton, setting her free, and shaking her hand with pain. 'Begone, for God's sake, and hide your vixen face! How foolish to reveal those talons to him. Can't you fancy the conclusions he'll draw? Look, Heathcliff! they are instruments that will do execution -- you must beware of your eyes.'"

Chapter 11

A. Metaphor: "Cathy, this lamb of yours threatens like a bull!' he said."

B. Allusion: "I wish you joy of the milk-blooded coward, Cathy!'"

C. Point-of-View: "Heathcliff measured the height and breadth of the speaker with an eye full of derision."

D. Imagery: "It was about the period that… [END OF PREVIEW]

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