Viewing papers 1-6 of 6 for post AND modern AND interpretation AND of AND slaughterhouse AND five AND by AND kurt AND vonnegut

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Post Modern Interpretation of Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut Essay

… Kurt Vonnegut, Billy Pilgrim and David Irving: Tralfamadorians in Training

Where Billy Pilgrim begins, Kurt Vonnegut ends and this is where David Irving intrudes for good measure. However this is what makes the post-modern interpretation of this book so interesting (at least to this author). Certainly, an all pervading odor of fatalism and cynicism colors the work and one can certainly not blame Vonnegut for this. A veteran of any war goes off to the conflict a boy and comes back an old man. All of the moments that they were in combat, captivity or any other aspect of their military service colors their perception of the world. In this postmodern classic, the difference between real and the non-real is not clear cut. Vonnegut keeps…. [read more]


Post Modern Interpretation of Slaughterhouse Five Essay

… Post-Modern Interpretation of Slaughterhouse-Five

Kurt Vonnegut's novel "Slaughterhouse Five" succeeds in putting together diverse elements, ranging from literary futuristic fantasy to aspects involving human condition. As shown by Vonnegut, it is very difficult to write fiction when the main topic that one has to address is warfare. The writer is assisted by postmodernism throughout the novel, as he combines reality with fiction in order to present his readers with the horrible effects that war can have on a human being.

During a period in which people could still feel the aftermath provoked by the Second World War, postmodernism emerged and its climax materialized through books like "Slaughterhouse Five." The novel dealt a massive blow to the people supporting the Vietnam War, as it had been…. [read more]


Post Modern Interpretation of Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut Essay

… Slaughterhouse Five

Pastiche and Metafiction: Postmodernism in Slaughterhouse Five

It is accepted, by the literary illuminati of history, that a plot, to be a plot, must organize itself around a question, often one with a yes-or-no answer centered on the novel's main character: Will Ahab kill the great, white whale? Will Pip escape the meanness of his upbringing? Will Frodo deliver the ring to the fires of Barad'dur? In this respect it seems that Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five fails the reader: no acceptable central question can be found to follow Billy Pilgrim. Certainly there is no question of whether he will survive Dresden, and, if there is, no conflicting or rising action exists to support that question as central. Perhaps the question is whether Billy…. [read more]


Post Modern Interpretation of Slaughterhouse Five Essay

… Post-Modern Interpretation of Slaughterhouse-Five

Meaning and form, purpose and relevance, reality and imaginary, these are a few concepts that the post-modern literature brings to one's attention by challenging everything one knows or believes to posses as knowledge.

Television, radio, newspapers and magazines are means of transportation for what is real as well as what is the result of creative minds from their sources into people's homes, invading their private spaces and gradually making the separation between real and made up become a blurry line that slowly starts to disappear. The technological advance of the second half of the twentieth century overwhelmed the world, people trying to keep their old landmarks and make them fit into this new perspective that was challenging everything. Life in a…. [read more]


Violence and Death in Slaughterhouse Five Kurt Term Paper

… Violence and Death in Slaughterhouse Five

Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., a fourth-generation German-American now living in Cape Cod, was an American Infantry Scout and as a Prisoner of War, witnessed the fire-bombing of Dresden, Germany, the Florence of the Elbe in 1945. Fortunately, or unfortunately, depending on the character, he survived to tell the tale: Billy Pilgrim, the hero of Slaughterhouse Five, -- or the Children's Crusade, bounces around in a time spanning his life and believes he is aided by an extraterrestrial civilization that has kidnapped him and put him in a zoo. Containing sexual content, violence and offensive language, the book was censored and burned in Drake, North Dakota in 1973, banned in Rochester Michigan for religious reasons, challenged at Owensboro, Kentucky High School…. [read more]


Postmodernism Literature Crying of Lot 49 and Slaughter House Five Essay

… Postmodernism Literature

Both Thomas Pynchon's "The Crying of Lot 49" and Kurt Vonnegut's "Slaughter-House Five" are representative works of the Postmodern movement in literature, because of several common characteristics. First of all, the two writers belong to the post war generations of the 50s and 60s and, as such, are challenged by similar modern anguishes, such as the lack of clear static moral values and the loneliness and alienation that derive from that. The Second World War represented, in many ways, a break with the past and this is the first generation dealing with this break and with the necessity to identify a new path of development.

Second, the two works share common themes, such as temporal distortion and the absence of a clear narrative…. [read more]

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