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Mass Transit Transportation Is Important for Long-Run

Mass transit transportation is important for long-run economic growth. For example, in many cities, the economic cost of the commuting time is huge. By lifting this issue, it would bring a significant improvement in the economy's efficiency. From there, it is apparent that the economic and military power of a nation has been closely tied to efficient methods of transportation.…

Pages: 10  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 7


Mass Transit in Atlanta Georgia

Mass Transit in Atlanta, GA Mass transit in Atlanta, Georgia is not without its limitations; however, on the whole it is convenient, affordable, and progressive, and valuable to the population. The Georgia Regional Transportation Authority puts out an annual report on metro Atlanta's transportation systems. It is a comprehensive and detailed accounting of the condition of transit in the state…

Pages: 9  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 10


Walking City

Walking City This work will discuss the makeup of the Walking City and how the development of modern transportation caused that type of city to disappear and helped created the Industrial City including aspects such as mass transit, urban sprawl, spatial segregation and how the rise of industrialization changed the face of the city forever. Finally, this work will describe…

Pages: 5  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 5


Public and Mass Transit Are

The background offered by the DfT and others stress that the HS 2 would be in high demand and would serve areas not currently served, especially with regard to long distance transportation at rapid rates. Though of course this affirmation does not come without controversy, as several community action organizations have openly come out against the HS 2 plan. Yet it is clear that any mass expenditure on infrastructure will obviously garner debate. Literature Review The debate over the particular rail line locations seems to be at the root of the controversy as some argue that certain parts of the new line proposed in HS 2 are redundant and will cause harm rather than help the nation. Savin and Wendover HS 2 argue that the benefits to cost ratio provided by the DfT and the organization in charge of planning for HS2 (HS 2 ltd.) overestimated new ridership and therefore skewed the Benefits Cost Ratio and that certain areas of the HS 2 line namely Chiltern routes are redundant and would cause environmental harm and land use harm (2010, p. 2-39). Another organization Bluespace Thinking Ltd. Argues that HS2 will create greater CO2 emissions than expected and reviews economic benefits offered by the DfT (2010). Greengauge21 argues that the existing rail lines need to be analyzed to see what their purpose and use will be after the HS 2 builds are complete (2011). Finally, BetterthanHS2 says that land use issues will be crucial on a social and economic level and have not been addressed by the official reports (Betterthanhs2.org, 2011)Yet, again all of this speculation and debate is answered by HS 2 ltd., and the DfT in several documents with substantial statistical data, including documents addressing the benefits cost ratio, analysis of ridership projections, stress on the increased demand for rapid long distance travel and the many potential social and physical benefits of the HS 2 lines. (DfT, 2009, 2011, 2011) From the collection of documents reviewed for this work the DfT and HS 2 ltd. Are clearly demonstrative of the most thorough as well as foundational infrastructural elements and do seem to be planning for the HS 2 line in a manner that considers both primary and secondary costs and benefits. DfT and HS 2 are set to a very high standard that stresses the need to be accountable and transparent in ways that other organizations are simply not…

Pages: 4  |  "Literature Review" Chapter  |  Style: Harvard  |  Sources: 7


Death of Public Transportation in L

Death of Public Transportation in L.A The Pacific Electric Railway was at its apogee the biggest trolley system in the world, as it served fifty-six cities and an approximate of eight million individuals per year. Most people find it bewildering that it came to an end shortly after it seemed to be the most advanced urban travel structure, especially given…

Pages: 5  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 6


American Transportation Policy Robert Jay Dilger Transportation

American Transportation Policy Robert Jay Dilger Transportation is recognized for the indispensable role it has and in hope that it will become more effective, certain people have produced debates regarding whether it is the private sector or the public sector that should be given total authority over the business. Governments were often criticized for intervening in certain industries, given that in most cases they failed to competently manage the segment they were leading. It is difficult to determine whether governments would do a good job at taking care of transportation, since there are numerous variables involved in this matter. While governments in particular countries have successfully managed to administer fields that are typically run by the private sector, others have failed severely at doing such a thing. For the time being (that is, until a proper model of government leadership will be devised) it is not advisable for the public sector to take on duties managed by the private sector. Governments have reportedly expressed more interest in particular domains concomitantly to ignoring others. When taking into consideration the fact that the American government has had a tendency to build and improve highways while mass transit was paid little attention to, one is unlikely to support the government in interfering in other domains (Dilger 2). Because of its character, the government is involuntary engaging in performing actions that ignore segments of the public. Question 2: The U.S. is presently considered to be world leader because of the positive features it proved to have all across the twentieth century. However, its position is undermined by the slow progress it experienced in the recent years. Civilian air transport has been one of the main topics the transportation system has dealt with in the last period. Mostly because of the 9/11 events, the U.S. government has intervened in this field of transport and has installed a structure meant to facilitate safe travel by plane concomitantly with reducing the risk of terrorist threats. Everything appeared to be going well consequent to the implementation of this system. Matters are presently different and U.S. air transport has come to be inefficient, as it cannot match air transport controlled by other countries. With the U.S. gradually losing its position as world leader, it seems that all of its problems are emerging, waiting to be discussed. It is unlikely that the country will be able to restructure its air…

Pages: 3  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 1


Transportation Economics

Transportation Economics Despite the fact that NAFTA was passed under the leadership of a Democratic president, it became a contentious issue in the race for the Democratic primary of 2010: Barak Obama said he opposed the basic principles of NAFTA, while Hillary Clinton supported them. NAFTA has been one of the most controversial trade treaties in recent memory, despite the…

Pages: 4  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 5


Public Transit Has a Serious Image, What

Public transit has a serious image, what can be done to improve this and attract choice riders a) Extent to which transit suffers from a negative image: With the constant upsurge in population, roads and highways become more overcrowded, and national resources become more valuable, it will come to be more and more important to realize the overall economic and…

Pages: 8  |  Term Paper  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 8


Effects of the Americans With Disabilities Act in Regards to Transportation

Transportation and the Effects of the Americans With Disabilities Act In a society concerned, above all, with inclusiveness, the Americans with Disabilities Act is designed to improve the lives of those with physical or mental impairments. Passed in 1990, the act was intended as yet another step in the fulfillment of the promise of civil rights for all that was…

Pages: 20  |  Term Paper  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 12


Urban Mass Transportation Act of 1976

Public Transportation Policy The United States is considered to be one of the most modern states in the world. It represents a symbol of democracy, technology, and innovation. At the same time however, it has often been envied by more traditional societies and nations with a longer history for its sense of evolution and the rapid growth of the nation,…

Pages: 12  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 8


Regulation of Transportation Industries

Regulation of Transportation Industries Aviation Industry Aviation industry is large connecting different parts of the world which has been the reason business can be conducted from one place to another within the shortest time possible. It is the airline industry that has enabled globalization to take effect in other industries. The airline industry has enabled people to operate at an international level due to the interconnectivity of the markets which changed the nature of how business is conducted. The rise in the number of travelers across the globe for both business and leisure and the choice of air as the mode of transport saw the industry grow bigger. Different carriers have emerged making the industry one of the most competitive in the transport industry. The industry has however been affected by various issues including recession in the early 1990's, the economic crisis and to a larger extent terrorism which saw a decrease in the number of travelers across the world. Most airline companies as a result made losses and had to look for alternative ways to restore customer confidence in the use of air transport and improve on profitability. The terrorist attacks which targeted planes shook the industry and as a result certain routes had to be abolished by the carriers as a security measure to ensure safety standards and at the same time they increased security in the industry to gain back the public's confidence. Technology has been used and screening measures for both cargo and passengers have been enhanced which has seen the industry's profitability increase over the years (Department of Homeland Security, 2012). For many years the industry was regulated and the government closely monitored the industry. It was the duty of the U.S. government to determine the rates and routes which were to be followed by the carriers. The industry was however, deregulated in the year 1978 with the passage of the Airline Deregulation Act. There were several factors that led to the deregulation of the industry; the rise in the fuel price contributed immensely to the government's decision to deregulate the industry. It became very expensive to travel by air which led to fall in businesses and at the same time it became costly to maintain the airlines and remain profitable. The industry was therefore left to be controlled by the market where by the rates were market driven. Several restrictions were lifted and the…

Pages: 2  |  Research Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 2


Transit Fleet Safety Identifying Important Components of

Transit Fleet Safety Identifying Important Components of a Transit Fleet Safety Program Over the past several decades, transit managers across the country have been able to maintain and manage capital assets worth several hundred billion dollars that provide transportation services to tens of millions of large-city riders and compel several millions of others from turning the highways into the type…

Pages: 6  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Transportation Systems These Two Questions Are a

¶ … Transportation Systems These two questions are a written paper 2 pages each or combine them together and 4 pages. After reading the ?Transit projects a guide for practitioners? chapters 1 -2 provide and explain some general steps that the state of New Jersey, in our discussion post, must have taken in order to obtain an idea of benefits…

Pages: 10  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 10


Air Traffic Has Continued to

S. And Hong Kong (Brigantic et al., 2009). However, it can easily be estimated from these above given scenarios that if an influenza pandemic did occur and stay for 12 to 36 months what would be the amount of damage that it would cause in the world (Brigantic et al., 2009). Continuity of Freight Distribution It is an established fact…

Pages: 110  |  Thesis  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 110


Compare San Diego and Tokyo

¶ … urban sociology at academies such as the University of Chicago has focused largely upon such theoretical factors as the development of urban areas, the functioning of human community within cities, the flow of capital in urban economies, and the like. In a recent reader on urban sociology edited by Lin and Mele (2005), for example, the essays are…

Pages: 5  |  Thesis  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 4


Private Security

Private Security After 911 The terrorist attack of September 11th, 2001 forever changed American transportation. As the country reeled from the attacks, plans were quickly made to alter the way the United States would screen airport passengers and their property. With the formation of the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), private screeners were removed from all but five commercial airports in…

Pages: 7  |  Thesis  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 7


International Marketing the Future Automotive

Scott (2002) said, "Americans also seem to want the car that can do it all - a station wagon, sports sedan, minivan, pickup, even convertible all rolled into one." This is what they price they pay for, and in fact it is a very practical, and good choice. This means that manufacturers required their designers to make the most with…

Pages: 10  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Colgan Air Flight 3407 Accident

Colgan Air Flight 3407 Accident "These people knew what they were supposed to do, and they did it" Kathryn O'Leary Higgins (as cited in Buffington, 2009, p. 351). The Accident On the night of February 12, 2009, Colgan Air Flight 3407, a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 121 scheduled passenger flight, flying from Newark, New Jersey to Buffalo-Niagara…

Pages: 12  |  Research Proposal  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 3


Pros and Cons of Roadway Congestion Pricing

Public Policy Variable Pricing as a Means for Controlling Urban Congestion: An Analysis of Data from London, Stockholm, and New York City The Problem of Congestion The myriad negative effects of persistent congestion Pollution Fuel waste Increased transit times Added costs to goods and services Why congestion continues despite increased expenditures on highway infrastructure Traditional mitigation schemes are ineffective More…

Pages: 12  |  Term Paper  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 10


Electric Hybrid Cars vs. Gas Powered Cars

Electronic/Hybrid Cars vs. Gas PCs One of the most profound social questions of the modern day is the nature of the market addition on fossil fuel usage. Within the global economy the fossil fuel industry, and the worlds dependence on it has driven prices of fuel to enormous levels contributing to a global market situation where a very few hold…

Pages: 9  |  Term Paper  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 3


Engineering Materials: High Strength Steel

A Canadian study found that by using magnesium in the chair design results in a "weight reduction of approximately 475 kilograms per 50-passenger motor coach" (Guerette 2004). Also magnesium chairs can be less expensive to product than the standard steel frame. A cost benefit analysis suggests that using a lighter weight material such as magnesium results in direct savings in…

Pages: 10  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Internal Theft Shrinkage at Subways in the United States

Internal Theft Subways Internal Theft/Shrinkage at Subways in the United States Description of Internal Theft/Shrinkage at Subways in the U.S.: Internal theft/shrinkage refers to the incidents of thefts and burglary in the American subways. Among the latest chain of guides prepared by the Justice Department's office of Community Oriented Policing Services unveils the masks from the retail burglary. It is…

Pages: 5  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


NYC and California Post-Ww2 Let

PART B California is on the western Pacific Ocean coast of the continental United States. The southern border of the state touches Mexico, and the desert climate of the American southwest. The northern border of California stretches into the rainy redwood forests of the Pacific Northwest, with Oregon to the north. The length of the California coastline was estimated by the U.S. Department of Commerce in 1975 to be roughly 840 miles: by purpose of comparison, the distance from the southernmost to northernmost points on the island of Great Britain (Lands End to John O'Groats) is about 874 miles. In other words, California is almost precisely as long, north to south, as the island of Great Britain. But California (with approx. 164,000 square miles) takes up nearly twice as much space as the island of Great Britain (with approx. 81,000 square miles). A plane ride from New York City to Los Angeles currently takes about 5 hours and 45 minutes. (Of course, there is a time zone difference of 3 hours between the two, so flying to LA from NYC "lasts" for 2 hours 45 minutes, but flying to NYC from LA "lasts" for 8 hours 45 minutes.) The driving distance is estimated at somewhere between 2400 to 2800 miles: it would take something like 45 hours to drive without stopping. The growth of Los Angeles is a 20th century phenomenon, according to U.S. Census data. In 1910 it is not even one of the top ten most populous cities in the U.S.A. In 1920, it is the tenth most populous city. In 1930, it has jumped to being the fifth largest city, and remains at fifth in 1940. In 1950 it is America's fourth largest city. In 1960, 1970 and 1980 it stands as the third largest city. Only in 1990 does it come in second place to NYC, where it has remained until the present day. It is no accident that these dates correspond with the rapid growth of Hollywood and the entertainment and mass communication industries in the 20th century. Los Angeles is a particularly good location for outdoor filming, though: it seldom rains (only a few days a year) and by and large the climate is warm, sunny, and pleasant (as Angelenos never stop reminding New Yorkers). It has the benefit of being essentially a desert climate, while still situated on the Pacific ocean which softens…

Pages: 3  |  Essay  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Public Budgeting Comparisons of the

In the FY 2011 it was mentioned that the St. Lawrence Seaway remained open for 99% of the time during the shipping season. Continuous efforts are also being made to ensure that the flow of traffic on the roadways is improved as well. Although decrease in delay was noticed in many areas but these results were not very clear due…

Pages: 22  |  Research Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 7


Urbanization of Californian Suburban City

It is amazing that by 1930s, there were literally no medical clinics in the area. Lyle Sadler in his early recollections of Palmdale and Lancaster confirms the lack of medical facilities in this area. He writes, "For many years there were no doctors in Palmdale and a good part of the time none in Lancaster either -- people took care of themselves and each other or went for Mom Everett, a midwife who delivered most of the babies, scarcely ever lost one either. She was a pretty good substitute for a doctor." (See reference 2) Therefore the opening of its first big hospital in 1963 was a grand occasion for people here. Ronald Reagan also visited this city in 1969 when he was the governor of California. By 1970, the population has increased to 40,000 and people began pressurizing the government for official incorporation of the city. Stan Kleiner was the first elected mayor of Lancaster and since then the place has never looked back. The city is designed keeping in mind the modern needs of Californians and all areas are carefully planned. It is interesting that most of the locations in this city easily lead to the famous Lancaster Boulevard and one is unlikely to get lost in this area. The city has its own theatres, schools, commercial center, and library and in short all modern amenities are available for its close-knit community. We must however not forget that transportation is still a major problem for new visitors because of the fact that there is no proper bus or train service available. Metro link started its operations in Lancaster a few years back but it is still in its infancy and visitors are likely to find commuting a major problem. For a city, which was discovered by a railroad company, it is rather strange that it has no mass transit system. It is important to understand that like other Los Angeles cities, Lancaster also suffers from frequent traffic jams especially during early morning hours. For this reason, people need a well-planned underground train system, which would make commuting easier. Lancaster is a highly urbanized city and it boasts of a very well educated community. With a land area of close to 229.975 square kilometers, this city is quite self-sufficient as people have easy access to all modern facilities and well-known supermarket chains. Being a modern suburb, it is quite…

Pages: 3  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Emergency Planning: Washington, DC Emergency

There is no template, per se, that we can work from. Another threat in Washington, DC is a transportation strike: Sounds simplistic, but a such a move would cripple the city's economy. Emergency planners have to be ready in case mass transit workers do ever strike and shut down the metro and the buses in Washington. Just this week, Washington declared a state of emergency for snow. Although Washington is not as affected by weather as other cities - there are not tornados, hurricanes, etc. - snow and ice can still pose serious hazards that emergency planners will have to contend with. In any emergency, though, urban search and rescue, law enforcement, medical assistance and government will have to operate in completely different contexts. That is why the emergency planners in Washington have come up with several contingency plans for each type of emergency. Will martial law have to be declared? That is one of the most important questions in emergency management. At what point are our court systems rendered useless by the events around us? As a democracy, this is of course a very dangerous question to ask, but one that must be asked. At what point are law enforcement and government officials accorded more power because of the emergency situation? Legally, the army cannot be used to police the citizens because of Posse Comitatus, so the burden will fall on the police, both federal and local, and arguably on the National Guard. A serious emergency might call for activation of the National Guard to enforce peace and continuity of government. But still, the most important step for emergency planners to take is to anticipate every possible emergency. To that end, the DC city government has listed those possibilities: severe weather, urban fires, transportation accidents, special events - demonstrations, urban floods, utility and power failures, hurricanes, radiological and HAZMAT incidents, terrorism, civil disorders, water supply failures, critical resource shortages, explosions, earthquakes and tornadoes. The challenge for emergency planners is to take that list and develop coherent plans to respond to each disaster, that can be modified as time progresses and as needs merit. But with the resources of the federal and local government, emergency planning in Washington, DC could……

Pages: 3  |  Term Paper  |  Style: n/a  |  Sources: 0


Nation on Wheels: The Automobile

For example, Foster blames part of the inward movement of people from outdoors to indoors in suburbia on the automobile, citing "As numbers of vehicles rapidly expanded, so did levels of noise and air pollution. Porch sitting simply became less pleasant. For children, playing in the street became for (sic) more dangerous" (Foster 60). While he does acknowledge other factors in this hypothesis, including the television, he fails to recognize many other arguments, including the "porch sitting" of the past, when horse drawn wagons and buggies churned up unending dust on unpaved roads, and children playing in the street faced danger from runaway horses and fast-moving wagons. Therefore, as the book continued, I began to question some of Foster's suppositions along with his proofreading. I also really disliked his basic ignoring of the dangers of the automobile, except for a few paragraphs here and there, until the last chapter of the book that looks forward into auto safety of the future. Driving a car is not simply a joyride, it can be extremely dangerous, and automobiles kill thousands more people than air crashes every year. It seems rather irresponsible of the author to continually show the positive sides of driving, from his analogies on vacations to drive-in movies, while not mentioning the dangers of autos, and how many happy teenagers they kill every year. The subject of drunk driving, another unwelcome addition to our society by the auto is also completely ignored. The author spends more time on the environmental concerns of cars today and in the future than on safety issues, and this seems to be a major oversight on his part. This lack of some backup in his thinking did not totally take away from the book, and some sections were absolutely delightful. One of my favorites was the author's discussion of automobiles and the freedom they offer to teenagers. Remembering my own first car, and how proud I was to drive it to high school every day brought back many memories of young freedom. I felt like I was the "king of the world" driving my first car, and that nothing bad could ever happen to me. The very American drive-in theatre played heavily in my young driving days, and the section on drive-in movies dredged up many happy memories of summer nights, popcorn, and young love. The history of Michigan is secondary in this book to…

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Americans Are in Love With

In his book, Auto Safety: Assessing America's Performance, John Graham summarizes his assessment of road safety, "the benefits of auto safety regulation are more tangible, compelling, and susceptible to scientific documentation that is the case for many other forms of health, safety, and environmental regulations. In summation, the love of the automobile, despite its many dangers, is only growing. In a country where every household averages two cars, the availability of personal, motorized vehicle is not a luxury, but rather a necessity. We often take for granted the opportunities afforded by our motorized society. Instead of relying on mass transit, those with automobiles have the luxury and convenience of traveling on their own time, and of their own means. The dangers of automobile, however, are significant. Pollution and traffic congestion are concerns, but the greatest problems associated with automobiles are their safety, or lack thereof. Car accidents are one of the leading killers in the country each year, accounting for about 40,000 deaths in the year 2001 alone (DriveHomeSafely website). Further exploration of traffic safety in the United States reveals that the primary group responsible for traffic accidents and fatalities (relatively speaking) are teenagers. While the cause of this can somewhat be contributed to drowsiness or lack of sleep, the primary reason why teenagers are so prone to accidents is their lack of experience. While many efforts have been made to remedy this problem, none have been significantly effective in increasing the safety of teenage drivers. It is my contention that maturity, above all else, is the key to facilitating experience. Teenagers need those years normally reserved for licensing today (ages 15, 16, 17) to practice driving and clock in as many hours as possible on the road. It is only after they gain experience and maturity in age (18) that they should qualify for a license. Works Cited Direnfeld, Gary. "Reducing Injury and Death in Teen Drivers. Journal of Trauma Nursing. Vol. 8. Jan-March. 2001. Dys, Andrew. "Officials Hope to Curb Accidents by Raising Driving Age." Herald Online website. 21 January 2002. Accessed 4 August 2003. http://www.ipromiseprogram.com/links/Officials%20hope%20to%20curb%20accidents%20-%20Herald%20-%20SC.htm Graduated Driver's License." DriveHomeSafe website. Acessed 4 August 2003. www.drivehomesafe.com/teen_driving_sample_graduated_driver_license_california.htm. Graham, John. Assessing America's Performance. Dover: Auburn House. 1989. Lechliter, "Raise the Driving Age." Garden City Telegram. 15 May 1998. Beginning Teenage Drivers." National Transportation Safety Board: Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, 2000. Harfst, David and Jerry Marshaw. The Struggle for Auto…

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Edge Cities by Joel Garreau.

Buses and automobiles were also responsible for the suburban expansion of residential and commercial areas. This led to the development of the commercial shopping malls of different sizes in the suburban locations. Also, metropolitan cities are undergoing the spread of Edge Cities because of continuous sub-urbanization. Far before the systems of few highways in and around major metropolitan areas, the expansion of non-manufacturing activities in these areas was mainly because of the tall buildings controlling the central business districts and also because of the development of the commercial areas along major access routes. The success of commercial strips led to the opening of the shopping centers to cater to the increasing suburban populations in various malls and regional shopping complexes. The malls and other shopping outlets were also appreciated because of the great distances to the main city due to the limited access highway systems. The highway systems played an important role in the new location of manufacturing activities, because they could now use highways for transport since such activities had been constrained by their locations due to non-availability of railways, or water transport. Suburb expansion is the way to utilizing more space for both residence and business in today's fast-paced world.……

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Rezoning of Hudson Yard

Proper development of the MTA rail yards. More than 10 acres of public open spaces and new parks. That level of rezoning would take time to adjust to, and had to also be planned around making sure people could get access to the various areas that had been rezoned. Without proper mass transit access, the project could become a colossal…

Pages: 12  |  Term Paper  |  Style: MLA  |  Sources: 5


Challenges in a Hybridized World

¶ … Hybridized World Annotated Bibliography Hybrid Cars: All about Hybrid Vehicles, Hybrid Theory of Operation, Pros & Cons, Tax Credits, Oil Pricing, Nitrogen Tire Inflation (2007) CarBuyingTips.com Online available at http://www.carbuyingtips.com/hybrid-cars.htm This report explains precisely what a hybrid vehicle actually is and explains the different modes of operation of a hybrid vehicle, of which there are five. The hybrid…

Pages: 11  |  Term Paper  |  Style: APA  |  Sources: 16


Immigrants to Obtain a Driving

Allowing illegal immigrants to obtain driving licenses provides record keeping information, the opportunity for car sales and related sales, insurance attainment and other things that are otherwise not something that can be done. There are no down sides to allowing illegal immigrants to obtain driving licenses. There are only positive things that can come from it. If illegal immigrants are allowed to get driving licenses the roads will be safer because they have to pass a test of ability, in many states they will have to maintain car insurance and they will be one step closer to becoming legal here which is the goal of the opposition to begin with. REFERENCES IMMIGRATION CORNER; Gov. vetoes bill allowing driver's licenses for illegals Filipino Reporter; 10/7/2004; Gurfinkel, Michael J. Filipino Reporter 10-07-2004 Analysis: Issue of granting driver's licenses to undocumented aliens remains a hot issue around the nation All Things Considered (NPR); 12/10/2004; MICHELE NORRIS All Things Considered (NPR) 12-10-2004 Immigration Reform Is A Worthy Issue For Bush's 'Boldness' Roll Call; 12/13/2004; Morton M. Kondracke Roll Call 12-13-2004 Immigration reform to top Congress agenda Agence France Presse English; 12/9/2004 Agence France Presse English 12-09-2004 Firestone, David. 2001. Some States Move to Issue……

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Interdisciplinary Studies Personal Metaphor for

Each line is necessary to compose Times Square. Without each distinctive line, with its own history, types of people, even types of train cars, Times Square would not exist as such. This is the same when considering converging modes of thought and various fields of study that compose Interdisciplinary Studies. Each field is distinctive, and each field is necessary because without each part, I.S. would not exist as such. My metaphor helps me understand Interdisciplinary Studies from a broader perspective. The trains of New York City traverse the entire metropolitan area, and even lead to upstate and out of state. All of these trains are present and commuters may connect to them via Times Square. Interdisciplinary Studies may seem confusing, like the NYC MTA subway system, but there are places in the city, such as Times Square, where most, if not all the lines converge in one place and in such a way that many mike think is not possible, yet, there it is, famous and glorious. Some people may not think there is a rhyme or reason or logic to I.S. People may consider it confusing and cluttered or lacking focus. Yet with the use of this metaphor, visitors to Interdisciplinary Studies, just as visitors of New York City, see the sense it makes once we make it there to experience it for ourselves. We see how all the parts, or all the trains come together to create something new that is not possible without all those brilliant differences and distinctions.…

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Actions & Reactions in Extreme

Their yelling is so loud and goes on for so long that even people with headphones and earbuds on cannot hear the music blasting centimeters away from their eardrums. At one moment during the argument, the driver of the train taps on the brakes abruptly, causing passengers to jerk and shift into each other as well as the items they have with them on the train such as strollers, shopping bags, food, and bicycles. The arguing commuters slam into each other as a result of the abrupt tap on the brakes, and now because they are already angry, the unexpected and rough physical contact incites rage. A physical altercation erupts on the car, in the express train, full of people, that will not be stopping for tens of blocks, which could be anywhere from two to five minutes. The intoxication man pulls out a large, serrated knife, and the other man pulls out a switchblade. What will I do? I would be very scared initially because of the intense violence in a confined, yet mobile space, but my survival instinct is very strong, I would stay outwardly calm despite my fear. I believe I would engage in psychological removal to help me stay a little detached and relinquish some of my fear. I would get as far away from them as possible. I would covertly motion to other people to move and to stay calm. I would be prepared to pull the emergency cord on the train if one of the men stabbed the other brutally. I would also engage in mobilization of hope. By now, any undercover or off duty law enforcement officer would reveal him or herself by or before this point. If there were no law enforcement or anyone willing or brave enough to engage the brawl, I would have to wait it out, position myself close to an exit, and flee as soon as the doors opened.…

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Physical Science Andrew Cuomo Is

That is not all. Under his guise, Cuomo intends to further uphold the Environmental Justice Community Impact Grant Program, and he also wants to add more provisions to the New York State Environmental Quality Review Act among which includes more participation from grassroots communities. These communities would also be partnered up with the Department of Environmental Conservation in helping to keep townships clean and pollutant free. Governor Cuomo also believes in automobiles and mass transit systems that are environmentally conservative, and promotes the installation of high-speed railway systems, alternative types of fuel, hybrid vehicles and buses, and bicycle lanes. It is clear to see that Gov. Andrew Cuomo sees a New York State, and hopefully the entire United States, as a 21st century nation with a green future. There are currently two issues within New York State that Cuomo is tackling that could have larger implications throughout the country. One is preventing the drilling for natural gas under NYC's water supply, which could poison it for over 8 million New Yorkers (Cohen, 2011). Drilling is typically not environmentally safe, and Cuomo wants that to change now with the Marcellus Shale. The other issue stems from concerns over the Indian Point nuclear power plant just north of NYC (WCBS, 2011). Since the Japanese earthquakes and tsunami damaging a nuclear reactor, there is a major concern over whether something like that could happen in the U.S. particularly at Indian Point. With someone like Cuomo as NY state governor, hopefully something like that can be prevented. Works Cited: Cleaner Greener N.Y. "Andrew Cuomo." http://www.andrewcuomo.com/greenNY Cohen, Steven. "Andrew Cuomo's Visionary Energy Policy." http://www.huffingtonpost.com/steven-cohen/andrew-cuomos-visionary-e_b_672524.html Huffington Post 2011. Miller, Ashley S. "Governor-Elect Andrew Cuomo Outlines Environmental Agenda for New York." http://blog.sprlaw.com/2010/11/governor-elect-andrew-cuomo-outlines-environmental-agenda-for-new-york / Sive, Paget, and Riesel, P.C. 2009-2011. WCBS 880/AP. "NY State to Discuss Indian Point with Nuclear Agency." http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2011/03/19/ny-state-to-talk-indian-point-with-nuclear-agency / CBS Radio Inc. 2011.…

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Technology, Transportation, and Society -

All of the transportation methods consume fossil fuels, each linked directly to oil. The price of oil fluctuates, with oil prices capable of affecting all other areas of the economy. A rise in oil prices means businesses raise their prices to absorb the increased price of transporting their goods. This in turn means a higher price for the consumer. Transportation…

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Stimulus Plan's Affect on Transportation Industry

Transportation Infrastructure Implications of the Federal Stimulus Plan The White House's economic stimulus plan has potentially far-reaching implications for all Americans. The plan has set up a means for local and region governments to request funds for transportation infrastructure projects. Part of the plan also includes an innovation investment, where firms and individuals are encouraged to develop new technologies and…

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1920s Transportation Changes. Specifically it

However, probably the biggest change in the cities was traffic congestion. Author Sandler continues, "Combined with the trolleys that still moved along in great numbers over city streets, these vehicles created horrendous congestion" (Sandler 34). Many cities and communities still struggle with that congestion today. They also contributed greatly to the growing problem of air pollution in American cities. Another surprising thing they accomplished was making people safer. Most people might not think about it, but fire departments and police departments used trucks and cars to respond quicker to emergencies, so people's safety actually improved in the 1920s as more departments acquired automobiles and used them effectively. People's insurance costs often went down as a result of their greater public safety. Automaking became the nation's biggest employer by this time, too. Sandler states, "By the late 1920s- with more than 23 million cars on American roads and with about 85% of the world's motor vehicles being built in the United States-automaking became the nation's largest industry" (Sandler 35). This was a brand new industry, so it brought great change throughout the country, creating thousands of jobs and mushrooming into the giant car corporations of today. All of this new technology created a new sense of freedom and movement that was hard to resist. All sorts of businesses sprang up as roads crisscrossed the country. Motor hotels sprang up along the highways, food stands and restaurants put down roots, and people began to take family vacations across the country because they could find a place to stay and a place to feed the kids while they were on the road. It made the country seem much "smaller," because it was easier to travel and it gave American families the ability to travel widely and discover the freedom of the open road. In conclusion, the 1920s were a time of great social and cultural change in America. The lure of the automobile really grew in the 1920s. It changed everything from rural education to public safety, and it gave people a new sense of freedom and openness in their lives. They could travel greater distances, they could live in more desirable areas, and they just enjoyed a richer lifestyle with the automobile. Of course, there were some undesirable characteristics, such as traffic congestion, air pollution, and of course, the growing number of auto accidents and deaths associated with them. For the most…

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Bombardier Transportation Switzerland

Bombardier Transportation Switzerland History of Bombardier Inc. According to its website, Bombardier, Inc. is a Canadian-based global transportation company, mainly focused on airplanes and rail transportation. Bombardier, in contrast to its current speedy, dynamic, and high-flying image did not begin as a rail and plane production facility. Instead, according to the "About us: History" section of its website, it began with a humble snowmobile: "Born in 1907, Joseph-Armand Bombardier builds his first "snow vehicle" at the ripe age of 15. His motivation? To help people travel across the snow-covered roads of rural Quebec in Canada. In 1937, J.-Armand achieves his first major commercial success with the launch of the seven-passenger B7 snowmobile" ("History: 1930s," Bombardier, 2009). Until the 1970s, the company named after its founder, Bombardier, emphasized its innovative snow transportation product, but then the oil crisis forced it to diversify because of the high cost of fuel and the new demand for greener, more efficient mass transportation. Soon, it secured first contract to design Montreal's subway system ("History: 1970s," Bombardier, 2009). The 1980s saw further encroachments by the company into the airplane and rail market. The company today proudly identifies itself as a 'world class,' or luxury brand name in commercial and business jets, as well as a provider of the most technically advanced rail transportation equipment, systems and services. The company's main branch remains headquartered in Montreal but has divisions worldwide, including Switzerland. History of Bombardier Transportation In 2001, Bombardier relocated its rail transportation operations from Montreal, Canada, to Berlin, Germany. This was in response to the demand in Europe for extensive, fast rail networks. The rail division of Bombardier, Inc. is known as Bombardier Transportation and has a presence in more than 35 countries. It identifies itself as the world's rail equipment manufacturing and servicing industry. It offers "ingenious" rail solutions, according to the company's website, to both private and public enterprises ("About us: History," Bombardier, 2009). Overview of Bombardier Transportation Switzerland Switzerland is a small but centrally located nation. This makes it a vital hub of rail transport, as well as a popular destination for skiers. It also is a very diverse nation, despite its small size, encompassing individuals of French, German, and even Italian origins. The company has stations in Villeneuve, Winterthur, and of course Zurich ("Switzerland," Bombardier, 2009). External analysis What current PESTEL issues impact Bombardier Transportation? Political: The emphasis on 'going green' has…

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NY Railroads Improve Transportation? The Varied Communities

¶ … NY railroads improve transportation? The varied communities that existed in the state of New York demonstrated a frontier existence, excluding the states largest city, New York itself. The economic growth the entire state experienced as a result of railroad infrastructure can be seen in the exponential growth of the relatively rural cities in its borders that went from…

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